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April 2, 2013

The most interesting 17 year cicada facts

These are the 17 most interesting 17-year cicada facts (in my humble opinion). All these facts apply to 13 year cicadas as well.

  1. Names: People call these cicadas “locusts” but they are not true locusts — real locusts look like grasshoppers. The phrase “17 year cicada” indicates that they arrive every 17 years. The name “periodical cicadas” indicates that they arrive periodically and not each and every year. The scientific name for the Genus of these cicadas is Magicicada, and there are 3 types of 17 year Magicicadas: Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini and Magicicada septendecula. This is a true locust:
    Locust
  2. There are 13-year cicadas too: there are 13 year cicadas too! There are four species of 13-year cicadas: Magicicada tredecim, Magicicada neotredecim, Magicicada tredecassini, and Magicicada tredecula. Broods XIX, XXII and XXIII feature these cicadas.
  3. Eye Color: Most 17 Year Cicadas have red eyes, but they can also have white, gray, blue , yellow , or multi-colored eyes
    White Eyed Cicada
  4. Fungus: The Massospora fungus infects Magicicadas, filling their abdomens and destroying their ability to reproduce. Often, their entire abdomen will fall off. The cicadas actually spread the fungus throughout their local colony via mating — the Massospora fungus is a cicada STD!
    Fungus
  5. They’ll attack land on you if you’re using a power tool or lawn mower. Cicadas think the sounds made by power tools and lawn maintenance equipment are made by cicadas. They get confused and will land on the people using the equipment! Pro-tip: cut your lawn in the early morning or near dusk when the cicadas are less active.
    Cicadas on Man
  6. Cicadas have five eyes: Cicadas have two, obvious, large, compound eyes, and three ocelli. Ocelli are three jewel-like eyes situated between the two main, compound eyes of a cicada. We believe ocelli are used to detect light and darkness. Ocelli means little eyes in Latin.
    5 eyes.
  7. People eat them: People eat them. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, saute it. There, uh, cicada kabobs, cicada creole, cicada gumbo, panfried, deep fried, stir fried. There’s pineapple cicada, lemon cicada, coconut cicada, pepper cicada, cicada soup, cicada stew, cicada salad, cicada and potatoes, cicada burger, cicada sandwich… that’s, that’s about it.
    Cicada Ice Cream
  8. Animals eat them: all wild animals and domestic pets will eat them. Dogs will gorge themselves until they choke. Squirrels will eat them like corn on the cob. Wild turkeys will grow fat and juicy on the cicada feast. Fish go crazy for them too — you can use them as bait, or use lures that mimic them.
  9. Cicadas “eat” tree fluids: Cicadas don’t eat solid foods — instead they use their slender, straw-like mouth parts to drink tree fluids.
  10. Cicadas pee: Yes cicadas pee, so wear a hat when walking under trees if that sort of thing bothers you. Cicadas drink tree fluids, and then expel the excess fluid they do now need. People call it “honey dew” or “cicada rain”.
  11. That cicada sound: Only male cicadas make the sound they’re famous for. Males have organs on their abdomen called tymbals. Muscles pop the tymbals in and out, which creates the sound we hear. Males make different calls for different reasons, and each species has a unique sound. Females can make sound too — they flick their wings to respond to males. Read this article for more information.
    tymbals
  12. There are billions of them: there are literally billions of 17 year cicadas. Why? One theory suggests that the large number of cicadas overwhelms predators, so predators are never able to eat them all and cicadas, and many always survive to mate. This is a survival strategy called “predator satiation”.
  13. They damage wimpy trees: the biggest concern about 17 year cicadas is their potential to damage young trees. The truth is they will damage limbs on the wimpiest of trees, so if you if you have weak, pathetic, wimpy ornamental trees in your yard you should consider placing netting around the trees if the cicadas visit your yard. Also you can try hosing them off with water, placing insect barrier tape around the trunk of the trees, or picking them off like grapes! Or, plant strong, beefy American trees — that’s what I would do. Cicadas actually benefit the health of trees by aerating the soil around the roots, and trimming the weak or damaged limbs.
  14. Stragglers: Periodical cicadas that emerge in years before they are supposed to emerge are called stragglers.
    hipster cicada
  15. 17 and 13 are prime numbers. Scientist speculate that one reason why these cicadas emerge in 17 or 13 year cycles is because those are prime numbers. The fact that 13 & 17 are relatively large* prime numbers makes it difficult for predators to synchronize with them. (*Relative to the average lifespan of an animal.) Annual cicadas (cicadas that arrive every year) often have wasps specialized to prey on them; periodical cicadas have no such wasp because no wasp could evolve to synch with it.
  16. They use their color to warm up: Cicadas need to be warm to sing and fly around, but they’re cold blooded. Their dark skin absorbs the heat of the sun, which helps to warm them up.
  17. 17 year and 13 year broods co-emerge every 221 years. Cicada Broods usually don’t overlap geographically, and it is very rare when they emerge in the same year. The next time Brood II (the brood emerging in 2013) will co-emerge with another brood will be in 2115 when it co-emerges with Brood XIX. You might need a time machine to see that happen.

Bonus: More information on the morphology of 17 and 13 year cicadas, so you can tell the difference…

August 10, 2007

Archive of Magicicada Discussions from 2007 – Brood XIII

Note: chances are, there’s some annual cicadas mixed in here as well…

Jennifer — what you have isn’t Magicicadas, but another species like Tibicen. Tibicen emerge in late summer and not in broods.

Comment by Dan — August 10, 2007 [AT] 9:21 am

I live in Pleasant Grove, Alabama near Birmingham. We’ve evidentally got a large brood of cicadas here. I heard them in the trees the other day while out for my walk. It was deafening. I had no idea what they were. Last night one flew in the house and scared me half to death. I did a little research and found out what this bird-sized insect was. Now I am fascinated.

Comment by Jennifer — August 10, 2007 [AT] 8:41 am

Hello JK Fuller

I live in New York and could send you a dead specimen of a cicada if you so desire! Are you looking for a Periodical Cicada or Tibicen species?

Comment by Elias — July 10, 2007 [AT] 5:00 pm

I forgot to mention, I am in the middle of Dallas – Fort Worth metroplex in Texas.

Comment by Shelley — July 7, 2007 [AT] 9:01 pm

ok – I think I have cicada’s in my yard. I realize this is a board for cicada lovers, and I am not. I don’t go kill things, because I believe they are here for a purpose. However, they are scary the crap out of me while I am trying to weed. I realized today that the gigantic junebugs were only the shell of a bug… and that got me to thinking – where is the live one? I don’t know how to post a picture, but I do have two… is there someone I can email? I think if I knew what they were… then they wouldn’t be so scarry. Thanks – sunriseh2o [AT] yahoo.com

Comment by Shelley — July 7, 2007 [AT] 9:00 pm

Anybody aware of any Cicada groups around Chicago that might be expected to still be around in the next 5 days or so? I’d love to get one last look at a good-size group before they disappear for the next 17 years!

Comment by pat — July 6, 2007 [AT] 11:49 pm

They are still plentiful and very active in Blue Star Memorial Forest Preserves on Lake Avenue in Glenview as of today, July 3rd. They seem to be a later group than those in Schiller Woods as there are barely any dead bodies in the Glenview preserve. Hurray!!!! Had much fun playing with the little darlings. =0)

Comment by Caerann — July 3, 2007 [AT] 6:31 pm

The cicadas are ebbing but still going strong in the forest preserves just east of O’Hare. Here’s some of my photos:
http://www.flickr.com/gp/62785551 [AT] N00/W985SH

Comment by ramon — June 30, 2007 [AT] 12:53 pm

Can anyone send me a (dead) Cicada?

A few years ago I took my wife, a California girl, to Virginia where she heard cicadas for the frist time and was completely facinated. We happened to find a great cicada specimin but I managed to let the birds get it and she was heartbroken.

Can anyone supply me with an American (I know I can get them from China on Ebay)?

Thanks!
(remove the zz from my email)

Comment by JKFuller — June 29, 2007 [AT] 8:03 am

You say it was fun, but you’re trying to kill off the next generation — some people…

Comment by Dan — June 29, 2007 [AT] 6:50 am

Hey,well.,looks like their pretty much gone,here on the west side of Wonder Lake.weekend of 6/16,they where still quite loud and active,but also dropping off the tree tops,by 6/20,they where dropping by the shovel full,and their sing was becoming much softer,by the weekend of 6/24,only the slightest sound,and dropping from the trees.Now 6/29 ,theirs no sound and only afew have dropped from the trees.now where left with the cleanup and hope they didn’t damage my English Oak,which I started from a acorn, to badly,The tree is on its 4th year,and it got alot of little slits,I’am hoping that by spraying small areas of the tree,it will kill the eggs.It was alot of fun while it lasted.

Comment by j.mayer — June 29, 2007 [AT] 3:13 am

I thought it was slowing down,but today I decided to go back to the Lagrange woods one more time. As I turned left on to Lagrange rd from joliet rd,I started hearing more and more Cicadas from both sides of the road while driving. I turned into the woods and there were many pockets of Cicadas still singing. I got out of my car and was watching them fly everywhere. One Cicada landed on the top of my hand, then we watched each other for ten minutes and he flew off to join his friends. If you have time,go see for yourself because 17 years is a long time to wait. They are also still strong at the forest preserves at Harlem av and Joliet Rd.

Comment by Rob — June 25, 2007 [AT] 6:53 pm

Are they dying yet? I have had enough of them in River Grove,Il.

Comment by Kathy — June 25, 2007 [AT] 10:33 am

Take a Lesson from History: Sing a Song for the Cicada. http://www.hsus.org/wildlife/wildlife_news/take_a_lesson_from_history_sing_a_song_for_the_cicada.html

Comment by rob — June 22, 2007 [AT] 6:31 pm

Well they are pretty much gone in Brookfield, the din and the chirping have drastically stopped.

You can see the evidence of the egg-laying by the browning of the trees all over the place.

I still see a few stragglers here and there, but they are few and far between.

I believe Brookfield was one of the first emergence areas so not suprizing they have checked out here early.

Comment by Pablo — June 22, 2007 [AT] 5:17 pm

If your around the forest preserves on harlem ave and joliet rd, they are still singing loudly. I posted yesterday on the Lagrange woods, but put it in the question section. It was very quiet with only pockets of Cicadas still singing. Maybe they were one of the first to emerge.Last week, it was very much louder.If anyone seen todays wgntv news at noon,then you heard what Tom Skilling said about Cicadas. I sent him an email,but I know it will never get answered.

Comment by rob — June 21, 2007 [AT] 6:52 pm

In my area of Wheaton it’s definitely much quieter over the past few days.

Comment by Lucy — June 21, 2007 [AT] 10:38 am

cicadas really seem to be dying off. Has anyone else noticed this? Not nearly as loud or prevalent….

Comment by jb — June 21, 2007 [AT] 7:09 am

Sorry for the last two entries (shows I dont know what im doing). Here are the links to the pic and the video:

http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n122/mahweea/Chicago61707009.jpg

Comment by Maria — June 18, 2007 [AT] 11:04 am

Sorry, I didnt tell you we were there Saturday and Sunday June 16/17.

Comment by Maria — June 18, 2007 [AT] 10:20 am

We were at Lake Geneva at Aurora University and the Cicada were EVERYWHERE. When we got there, as soon as we opened our windows, WOW… what a sound!! I managed to get a couple of great pictures and even recording their song. Not sure how to post it on here, but would be glad to.

Comment by Maria — June 18, 2007 [AT] 10:17 am

I’m heading to Lake Geneva, WI, the weekend of June 23-25. Could anyone tell me a good place to look for the caicadas? I would really love to see them or at the very least see the remains of a hatch and hear the songs.

Comment by Sheilah — June 18, 2007 [AT] 7:01 am

Have all of the cicadas emerged already? I live in Grayslake and still haven’t spotted any. Is it possible the soil around here still isn’t warm enough for them to emerge?

Comment by Gramps — June 17, 2007 [AT] 5:36 pm

Saw a few dead ones in Wheaton this morning, although the trees were full of singing cicadas yesterday.

Comment by Lucy — June 17, 2007 [AT] 4:52 am

Palos Heights is crawling with these things. I can’t cut my grass without dozens of them dive-bombing my face and getting caught in my hair. So many are now dying around my trees that it looks like Cicada mulch. The smell isn’t pretty either. Their wings are pretty, but I’m not a big fan

Comment by Colleen — June 17, 2007 [AT] 3:52 am

June 16 – Northeast side of West Chicago – No sign of any cicadas here until yesterday (Fri June 15), we saw & heard a few Friday, lots more heard today.

Not sure where they are emerging from, there are no signs of exit holes anywhere, but it sure sounds like they are FINALLY starting to show signs of life around here, although not in the huge numbers I have seen elsewhere.

Comment by Dave — June 16, 2007 [AT] 4:42 pm

Found one in my yard in Georgia this week

Comment by Susan Williams — June 15, 2007 [AT] 7:16 pm

Today I was boating down the Cedar River near Atalissa, Iowa. When we reached a portion of the river near the Wiese Slough Wildlife Management Area, my friend and I heard the cicadas singing. We found a cicada floundering around in the river, pulled it out and let it fly away. After we got back to my parents cabin we could hear more cicadas in the woods but due to the horrendous amounts of mosquitoes we didn’t go and check it out. But I can definately say in this part of Eastern Iowa, the cicadas are out, although apparently not in the huge numbers they are in Illinois.

Comment by Joel — June 14, 2007 [AT] 5:47 pm

Here are some photos of one that literally followed me out to my car in the parking lot of Hewitt building 3OP in Lincolnshire. I walked past it, it turned around and followed me.. I picked it up and took it home in my car’s glove box and then proceeded to take photos of it.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/legoguy/tags/cicadas/

Comment by Andrew Keyser — June 14, 2007 [AT] 4:23 pm

Cicadas are all around Lincolnshire (esp. around the area of Hewitt buildings; they’re trying to get in through the revolving doors… unfortunately for them, it doesn’t work so well)

They’re also in Vernon Hills (near Westfield mall), and a VERY audible drone is coming from the MacArthur Woods Forest Preserve across rt. 21 from the mall.
This is somewhat close to the Old School Forest preserve (which I reported on last week)

Still waiting for them to show up in Gurnee next to the intersection of 45 & washington where my house is..

Comment by Andrew Keyser — June 14, 2007 [AT] 10:19 am

June 7, Large emergence in Big Foot Beach State Park (southern Wisconsin next to Lake Geneva). They emerged on the 7th and were still sitting low on the bushes the 8th and the morning of the 9th. As the day warmed up on the 9th they began to fly up into the trees. There was some singing, but it was not deafening yet.

I also visited a business park in Chicago, IL (Hewlitt?). Very loud with lots of fungus infected individuals.

Magicicada do not seem to sing as loud as other cicada species (as individuals). Is that true?

Comment by Douglas — June 14, 2007 [AT] 10:07 am

Valerie: its normal not to hear then at night. The only time you’ll hear them at night is if there’s enough artificial light present to made them think it’s daytime. It isn’t unusual to have small numbers of the insects in some areas.

Comment by Dan — June 14, 2007 [AT] 6:21 am

I live in south Wheaton. I hear the cicadas during the heat of the day but not at night. Is this normal? Also, there seem to be very few of them. I’ve only actually seen four bugs and I spend a lot of time outside.

Comment by Valerie McIntyre — June 14, 2007 [AT] 5:07 am

Coming into work this morning the side patio was littered with dead Magicicadas which I was surprised to see since we are in a fairly new industrial park, we’re at I55 and Weber Road in Romeoville. Do you think they emerged from this location or traveled here?

Comment by Mary B — June 14, 2007 [AT] 4:23 am

Well, I haven’t seen a single Magicicada until today. In Aurora,IL, they pretty much emerged today. I have only seen and heard Magicicada cassinis so far. No M. septendecim. Many of them are still very small. One landed on my neck and began to sing a song.

Comment by Daniela — June 13, 2007 [AT] 7:40 pm

You will not believe this. First of all, we live in Plainfield, in a subdivision that is only 10 years old. Yesterday morning, my 8 yr old son found a cicada at the bottom of the swimming pool. We got it out, it was stiff as a board, but my 6 yr old daughter wanted to keep it. We put it in a tupperware container, and this morning, IT WAS ALIVE! It sat at the bottom of our pool for at least 12 hours, and in a sealed container for another 12, and still lived!! We don’t know what to do with it, as it can’t move it’s wings enough to fly away. We don’t want any animals to eat it. These are amazing creatures!

Comment by Jill — June 13, 2007 [AT] 5:25 pm

I finally got to see some! One of the guys I work with brought some to work (in a cicada house) and they are so cool! Smaller than I imagined, but it sure made my day. I released them under a big tree, and they climbed right up and started singing.

Comment by Lucy — June 13, 2007 [AT] 3:56 pm

I am a long-time resident and nature photographer in Chicago, and remember the last invasion in ’90 (when I was 22). This time, it seems like there are even more.

I also drive a lot for work, and this gives me the unique opportunity to travel to/enjoy the surrounding suburbs. As the weeks have gone on, I noticed an increasing amount of cicadas until yesterday (the 12th), which I would estimate is the absolute peak for their numbers out in Elmhurst, where they are all over the downtown, and…

An incredible visual and auditory experience can be had if you head straight to the Des Plaines River Forest Preserves on Lake Ave., just east of River Road. There are tons, and the noise is so loud it is almost deafening.. after even 10 minutes of it, you almost have in your head what happens when you leave a loud rock concert!

I highly recommend to anyone who hasn’t experienced this relatively-rare nature phenomenon to get out and do it (and obtain photographic or video evidence)… for too many people simply take it for granted, and we won’t have this opportunity here again for 17 more years!

It is truly remarkable.

Thank you.

Comment by Bob Collins — June 13, 2007 [AT] 5:37 am

Brookfield is infested with them, went for a bike ride in the forest preserve near the zoo and the noise was deafening.

Comment by Tony — June 12, 2007 [AT] 2:09 pm

I live in Ottawa, Illinois and I’ve seen only one! Ottawa is near Marseilles, which is full of them, so I’m thinking the little guy (or girl) got lost. Here’s a picture of my little buddy sitting on my hand:

http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/2125/dscf8749gy0.jpg

By the way, can anyone give me any information pertaining to Ottawa’s cicadas, or lack thereof?

Comment by Courtney — June 12, 2007 [AT] 9:59 am

check out the forest preserve just south of the tollway and the cumberland exit. The noise is so loud, that even with the car windows rolled up, ac on, and in traffic, you can hear the cicadas as you drive on the nw tollway! They are very active here, flying low.

Comment by S.Jensen — June 12, 2007 [AT] 6:26 am

They might be — they might be running out of steam.

Comment by Dan — June 11, 2007 [AT] 8:50 pm

New question Dan. I noticed today that the cicadas are flying lower than they have been the last few weeks. Are they wearing out? I really don’t want to get covered in them so I run to my apartment!!

Comment by Michelle — June 11, 2007 [AT] 7:34 pm

Tons of cicadas near the Purdue-North Central campus in Westville. Other than the area in Valparaiso at the intersection of US 6 and state route 49, not to many other spots in Laporte / Porter counties in Indiana.

Comment by Tbone — June 11, 2007 [AT] 4:53 pm

I was driving on Lorraine Rd. in Wheaton and, finally, heard the cicadas singing. It wasn’t deafening, but I hope they’ll be more the warmer it gets this week. I’m so anxious to see one.

Comment by Lucy — June 11, 2007 [AT] 4:18 pm

Sat JUN 09 2007 LOTS of cicadas flying across North Ave in Elmhurst between York Rd & Rt 83, also southside of I290 on the way to Oak Park & on Irving Park Rd in the Forest Preserves in Schiller Park. Even with the windows up, the noise is deafening.

Comment by PlantLust — June 11, 2007 [AT] 12:40 pm

I live in an old section of Lombard and they are out in force here! The noise is ear-splitting! For awhile it seemed as though it wouldn’t be as heavy an infestation as in 1990, but then the heat hit–and so did they! Some have even managed to crawl inside the netting I put on some of my shrubs. Amazingly, they are also out in the parking lots at Wannemakers on Ogden and the Trader Joe lot, also on Ogden!

Comment by Pat — June 11, 2007 [AT] 10:19 am

The forest preserves along the Desplaines River in Schiller Park are loaded with cicadas now. We went to a parking area on Irving Park Rd right along the river yesterday. The sound of their calls was louder than I’ve heard it yet and the trees are loaded with them flying among the branches and over the road. One even flew into our car window while we were driving! I think he was kind of mad that we wouldn’t let him out until we stopped the car near a tree (we didn’t want him getting hit by a car in the heavy traffic). He kept buzzing while we held him until we let him fly away.

I have a question about the sound they make. When we hear it in some areas where it is the loudest we actually hear two pitches. One is the buzzing that you expect to hear and the other is a higher pitched buzz sort of like the sound a jet makes when it is off in the distance and coming towards you. Is this change in pitch the sound of the cicadas coming from a distance? Or is it an echo of the sound? Or is one species making the lower sound and one species making the higher sound?

Comment by RH — June 10, 2007 [AT] 10:47 am

Rykk’s photos below are of a Pandora Sphinx moth.

Comment by T. Paul Wrobel — June 10, 2007 [AT] 3:51 am

Hello,

I saw this yesterday at work here in Virginia Beach. I walked back to the office and took this picture with my camera phone before it moved too far away. It looks just like a cicada, except the wings are solid, not clear and veiny. I’m posting both my original picture and my amateur attempt to brighten it up. The green is a very bright green, and the dark green is very dark. It also had it’s wings splayed out instead of backwards.

If it is a cicada, what kind is it?

Here are the urls of my pictures. http://www.ishnar.net/images/george.jpg

http://www.ishnar.net/images/george2.jpg

Comment by Rykk — June 9, 2007 [AT] 11:30 pm

The woods are loaded with them at Rt 6 and Old 49 north of Valparaiso,IN but not much else to the west. I did hear one for a short time in my tree in the front yard, but it was soon silent and no exoskeletons in my yard. Strange how they can be loaded in one area and absent in another adjacent area. Too much development I guess.

Comment by Dan — June 9, 2007 [AT] 9:02 pm

OH my gosh in the burbs of chicago in a forest preserve near the last exit on the tollway. by o’hare airport, ,MILLIONS UPON MILLIONS OF CICADAS!!! (literally im not kidding) my freind was right next to me and i had to yell for him to hear me 2 feet away over the 90 decible sound of cicadas. there were literally clouds of them. I cought about 200 in this bucket and let them go at a local forest near my house. you can see the whole life cycle!!! the nymphs, the mating, the shedding skin, a jet flew over and they got louder to OVERPOWER THE JET ENGINE 150 FEET ABVOVE US!!!! when we left my ears were aching from the sound. anyway you got the messege. lots of cicadas! TOLL WAY NEAR O’HARE!!! ROLL WINDOWS DOWN AND LISTEN> THEYRE IN SOME WOODS> THERES SO MANY YOU CAN SEE EM FLYIN AROUND!!!

Comment by Elijah — June 9, 2007 [AT] 7:20 pm

If you go straight west on 290, go to Elmhurst or Villa Park, you won’t have to do any hunting, they are everywhere here, i can’t find a way to get away from them in Villa Park.

Comment by jb — June 9, 2007 [AT] 4:51 pm

Hi, anyone know where the best place to go cicado hunting is? I’m new to the chicago area and want to see these bugs. Willing to drive out the ‘burbs, but unsure where to go. Thanks for any tips.

Comment by Amy — June 9, 2007 [AT] 11:49 am

Reporting about 10 (ten) Cicadas spotted in the Old School Forest Preserve in Libertyville, IL.

Pics up on flickr, here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/legoguy/tags/cicadas/

Comment by Andrew Keyser — June 8, 2007 [AT] 8:34 pm

I just wanted to report that I’ve heard cicadas in the forest preserves on Thornton Lansing Rd in Thornton, IL
as well as Lansing, IL in the area of Stony Island Ave.
I drive through Homewood, IL every day on the way home from work
and it’s quite noisy so I do know what they sound like.
They’re not swarming but I did feel like I wanted to
roll the windows up in my car as I was traveling
down 183rd St in Homewood.

Comment by Judy W. — June 8, 2007 [AT] 1:42 pm

Thanks Dan for for the answer, the drone is back again! I started out terrified by these little fellas and now I’m kind of taken by them, how weird is that!! I’m still kind of scared of them, but don’t tell anyone!! I still visit this website every day despite my reservations.

Comment by Michelle — June 8, 2007 [AT] 11:41 am

Yes- they need to dry out and be reasonably warm to sing.

Comment by Dan — June 8, 2007 [AT] 10:07 am

It’s so weird, all of the sound of cicadas is gone after the storms last night. I live in Downers Grove and we have a large amount in the trees outside our apartment. This morning there is no droning sound and I looked out the window and it looks like they’re all hanging on the trees sleeping or something. Anyone knows what’s up?

Comment by Michelle — June 8, 2007 [AT] 8:45 am

I live in Lombard and they’re HORRIBLE!! I think with today’s heat they decided to be really active. They are flying all over the place. The trees are full of constantly moving cicadas. I cannot safely make it to my car in the driveway. Neither the front or rear entrance is safe. A few rogue cicadas have made it inside by riding on my husband’s shirt and shoe. Ugh. My mom is in La Grange and we argue about who has it worse. My husband works in Oak Park and seen very few. I don’t mind the noise, I just can’t stand them flying all around.

Comment by Ellen — June 7, 2007 [AT] 10:10 pm

I live in a heavily wooded area in Lisle, not far from the Arboretum. We haven’t seen ANY here. You might hear a single one up in a tree now and then, but that’s it. I’m wondering if they are going to miss us, or if they will be here late. Anyone out there with answers????

Comment by Robin — June 7, 2007 [AT] 7:54 pm

West Nile Virus spray? Maybe. If they sprayed when the cicada were out and laying eggs. Normally pesticide is inert by the time in gets deep into the ground where they live.

Comment by Dan — June 7, 2007 [AT] 5:15 pm

We live on River Road – across from Schiller Woods in Schiller Park Illinois along the DesPlaines River….17 years ago the cicadas were so heavy in the DesPlaines – Oak Park area along River Road…they sounded like hail hitting the window when you’d drive through the woods…this time…nothing….we’ve seen a few half dead ones crawling on the ground – and on trees….but nothing at all like last time…is it over? Did they skip us? What gives? I know they sprayed the woods very heavily the past few years because of the West Nile Virus hitting alot of locals – I’m wondering if this coulda’ killed ‘em off….any input would be appreciated.

Comment by John Vilona — June 7, 2007 [AT] 11:39 am

This morning on my way to work, i was driving with my window half way open, when all of a sudden i feel something hit me on the head. I looked to the backseat and happened to find a Cicada. The little fracker hit me on da head! lol….

Comment by Miguel A. Beltran — June 6, 2007 [AT] 4:25 pm

Oh my gosh they are everywhere! Massive amounts, we’re talking thousands upon thousands in Villa Park. They are flying into my car while driving and swarms flying about everywhere.

Comment by Sheri — June 6, 2007 [AT] 11:01 am

live in Crystal Lake and have been looking for 2 weeks, if they aren’t here already will they never be here, do i need to do some searching in other areas or just wait longer? Anyone know anything?

Comment by stephanie — June 6, 2007 [AT] 10:21 am

They truly are an incredible phenemonom of nature….none to very few in Libertyville but are in numbers in Lake Forest and I went to the western suburbs Saturday and it was unreal…..literally trillions in Western Springs Hinsdale La Grange The Morton Arboretum etc…..thye have to be sen and heard to be believed !

Comment by Bill — June 5, 2007 [AT] 10:55 am

Okay, I’m trying to find the miraculous wonder and intrigue that you guys have been delighting in with these cicadas.

Although it’s been facinating reading about them, as I travel through Chicago’s Beverly area on my way to work and see legions of cicadas swarming tree’s to my left and to my right, up and down both 99th and 103rd street I know in my heart what is true.I will probably still raise my car windows with the sincere belief that if one of these things were to touch me I’d go into cardiac arrest, pass out and ultimately die.

Forgive me.

Comment by Melissa — June 4, 2007 [AT] 6:07 pm

Another fantastic site to view the magicicadas is the campus of Lake Forest College in Lake Forest, IL. We had a wonderful time with the kids listening and watching all phases of cicada life!!! Very scenic, easy to park and walk around. Check it out!

Comment by S.Jensen — June 4, 2007 [AT] 4:44 pm

hey,
incredible,thousands upon thousands flying thruout the trees,sing,kind of a bummer cleaning up after the empty shell casings.7:30 PM the backyard was boiling with another batch of nymph’s.W. side of Wonder Lake.Il.

Comment by j.mayer — June 4, 2007 [AT] 2:57 am

Amazingly I just heard an (unmistakable) septendecim from my backyard here in Bloomington, Indiana (south central part of the state). Is this a Brood XIII cicada way out of its territory or a Brood X straggler (3 years late)?

Comment by Mike Gasser — June 3, 2007 [AT] 8:14 am

JUST UPDATED my site. Check it out. Lots of images of the Midwest magicicadas.

http://www.seventeenyearcicada.com

PS Please put a link on your homepage.

Comment by John — June 2, 2007 [AT] 11:45 pm

We went to Goodrich Park in Naperville, IL today and my what a sight! We were driving to another location to see the cicadas but as we drove past Goodrich we heard the deafening buzz of the cicadas even though we had the windows rolled up and music playing. We got a few pictures that I uploaded on Flickr, but I have to say that several hours later my ears are still ringing! I’m thrilled I got to experience this.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/8466803 [AT] N04/

My fave pic: http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1112/527086040_05de19cfe5_b.jpg

Comment by Tonya — June 2, 2007 [AT] 8:25 pm

Went to McKinley Woods in Channahon today to see the cicadas, and lots of exit holes and shells, but they’re all way up in the trees so on the way home, near the I&M Canal and Rt. 6 heard the unmistakeable buzz and pulled over only to be surrounded by many Magicicadas! I gotta tell you that they get kinda ticked off when you try and pick them off a branch and let you know so. I think they know they’ve got a job to do and don’t detract them from it!
What a beautiful work of art this insect is and what a shame they’re with us only once every 17 years.

Comment by Mary B — June 2, 2007 [AT] 5:35 pm

I live in Alsip, IL and I haven’t seen any cicadas yet, but I can hear them in the woods along the Cal Sag Channel.

Comment by Julie B — June 2, 2007 [AT] 2:26 pm

Sugar Grove, Il

I have not seen a single cicada as of yet in my area. Even went to the forest preserve [Bliss Woods], not a thing. When do we giv up looking for them?

Comment by Deb — June 1, 2007 [AT] 11:39 am

IF THEY ARE NOT OUT BE NOW JUNE 1ST DOES THAT MEAN MY AREA WILL NOT GET THEM?

Comment by JOE TEPE — June 1, 2007 [AT] 9:17 am

A friend of mine spotted two cicadas at the McBride Raptor Center outside of Iowa City, Iowa last night.

Comment by Joel — June 1, 2007 [AT] 6:18 am

I volunteer at the Macbride Raptor Center in Solon, IA, and spotted at least 2 cicadas in the woods there last night. I almost stepped on one, but was careful to navigate on my way to the nature center. I’ll keep my eye out for further sightings.

Comment by Dawn — June 1, 2007 [AT] 6:16 am

Nothing so far in the Cary area. Does anyone think the weird weather this year has anything to do with the inconsistency? Haven’t seen or heard one at all.

Comment by TJ — June 1, 2007 [AT] 5:38 am

I was at the Rogers Lakewood park in Valparaiso and saw thousands upon thousands of shedded skins at the bases of trees and clinging to the lower branches. Saw a few unsuccessful emergences stuck dead in their shells too. Many, many gulls were picking through the grass and eating them. Hopefully the gulls didn’t make a dent in the adult numbers as I don’t think gulls this far inland is a natural thing….they are scavengers.

Comment by Dan — June 1, 2007 [AT] 4:04 am

one of these SOB’s fell in my orange juice cup this morning. they’re getting out of control. i can’t wait til they’re gone. how much longer do we have to deal with them?

Comment by jb — May 31, 2007 [AT] 1:29 pm

Highland Park, IL
Went outside this morning and there was no mistaking the cicada’s chorus that greeted me. There definately emerging on a consistant basis in our area, but if it’s going to be anything like it was in 1990, I would have to say that the majority of them are still underground. Can’t imagine how loud they will be when the rest of them arrive! Looking forward to it though, as I think it is a very cool sound.

Comment by DV — May 31, 2007 [AT] 8:47 am

hey,
day by day where seeing more,our backyard,as hundreds of empty shells,with more showing up every day.incredible yet odd,they showed up on 5-24,by sat.5-26 we could here them in the distant s,everyday it sounds a bit closer / louder yet our trees are silent,yesterday the sound appeared to be a couple blocks away,yet our trees and the neighbors are silent,has anyone else came across this?i know their still in the trees,when the birds land on the branches,the cicada’s scatter,odd.i have also noticed cicada’s with deformed wings or have died while shedding their shell. W.side of Wonder Lake.

Comment by j.mayer — May 31, 2007 [AT] 7:19 am

I’m way up in northern IL, in the easternmost corner… Has anyone seen or heard any up near me (Winthrop Harbor/Zion area)? I’ve taken my son to Van Patten woods on several days over the past couple weeks, but we’ve only found mosquitos!

Anything up near us???

Comment by Linda — May 31, 2007 [AT] 6:11 am

The emergence is on just east of Portage, IN. Just when I thought we wouldn’t get any, I heard a lone cicada in the tree a few doors down. I was working in my garden and noticed the ground just under the surface was riddled with holes a bit bigger around than a pencil. I have yet to find some skins, but they will turn up. I remember them here as a kid in 1973 and am glad they have not been wiped out by development.

Comment by Dan — May 30, 2007 [AT] 7:20 pm

I posted in the wrong spot!! They are the Magicicada cicadas up in McHenry! They are on Chickaloon Drive, and some can be found on Curran Road. Once you turn onto Chickaloon, start looking at the trees, amilboxes, telephone poles, whatever… they are on it!! Once you turn onto Chickaloon, if you drive about 1 block, you will start to see them. There are newly hatched ones, the “ghost” ones, and adults are flying, singing and buzzing around! There are so many empty shells littering the ground as well! It was an awesome spectacle of nature!! This was at 6:30 pm today, 5-30-07!

Comment by Kathryn — May 30, 2007 [AT] 5:51 pm

I haven’t seen any in Chesterton, Indiana or in the Indiana Dunes. I wonder if the sandy soil keeps them away. But yesterday (May 29) after work I drove to the Moraine Nature Preserve just south of Highway 6 and just east of Calumet Ave. (Old 49). As I approached my usual parking spot, I spotted empty skins on the trees, a hopeful sign. I parked at the edge of the forest and the beginning of a prairie, stepped out, and immediately heard the hummmmm. It wasn’t deafening, but it was very apparent and it seemed to come from all directions. A few steps from my car and there they were in all their buggie red-eyed glory: perched on trees, climbing up blades of grass, and, pretty quickly, climbing up me. I’m used to the skittish annual cicadas, so was a bit surprised (despite all I’d read) at how docile these little critters really are. What an amazing the force of nature! I’m definitely coming back here again to enjoy the “show.”

Comment by Steve — May 30, 2007 [AT] 12:11 pm

If you get a chance to see the cicadas shedding their shells, don’t miss it. Its a beautiful sight! It happens sometime between 9 pm -11 pm, maybe also as late as midnight. We don’t have cicadas naturally in our backyard, but we saw a yard where all of the trees had their trunks wrapped in plastic to keep the cicadas from climbing them, so we took about 30 of them home, let most of them go on a tree in our backyard and kept a few in a terrarium. It was amazing watching them come out of their shells! They are completely white except for 2 little black stripes on the top of their heads that look like bushy eyebrows above their red eyes. Their wings are shriveled up little stubs but after they are totally out of the shell, their wings start to unfold and they look like they are wearing white lace wedding dresses as they spread out their wings to let them dry.

The heaviest gathering of cicadas that we’ve seen so far is in La Grange and Countryside, but I’ve heard that Brookfield Zoo has a lot of them too.

Comment by RH — May 30, 2007 [AT] 7:25 am

They are emerging in Franklin Park as of a couple hours ago. It’s like hundreds came out of no where. I have not seen any in Melrose Park, Northlake,River Grove. Oak Park or Forest Park.

Comment by Franklin Park IL — May 29, 2007 [AT] 9:37 pm

Northbrook. I think I might have begun to hear the cicada’s songs this morning. Maybe?! I was sitting on my porch and, suddenly, all the squirrels and chipmunks started acting totally nuts! I then noticed a sort of background humming noise that seemed to be getting louder. I dunno…maybe it was a truck! The cicadas are in full force a couple blocks over and are now coming out in droves every night in my block.

Comment by Shelly — May 29, 2007 [AT] 7:32 am

My parents live in Forest Park and as of Saturday the cicadas had not yet emerged. People I know in Western Springs and Park Ridge have both had emergences already.

Comment by Bruno Cattivabrutto — May 29, 2007 [AT] 7:07 am

I live in wilmette and have a seen a few dead carcasses on the sidewalk so far. I grew up in a ciccada-free location, though we did have gang violence. any idea how much of this is going to hit wilmette? I haven’t heard of any wilmette/evanston/winnetka sightings. do they come to the lakefront as much as western suburbs?

My wife is really terrified and she was 13 the last time around and she describes the ciccadas like a zombie movie – crunch, crunch, crunch.

Comment by briand — May 28, 2007 [AT] 7:10 pm

their threw out are neighborhood now,early mornings,backyard has youngster that cracked out during the nite,we can hear them afew blocks away ,but not a sound is coming from our backyard yet.Wonder Lake,Il.

Comment by j.mayer — May 28, 2007 [AT] 7:18 am

Saw a ton of shells yesterday on trees and lightposts driving through part of River Forest (Forest Park?) by Chicago Ave and Thatcher.
Went back today to the nature center at the forest preserve at that intersection, and saw alot of adults hanging out, and empty shells. More of them than I’d expect had deformed wings. Got to see one of them hatch out of its shell, a recently hatched one with unfurled wings, still white, and another nymph getting started. Took a lot of pictures, which I’ll send along. They are so cool! This is my first time seeing the magicicadas. Where I grew up in Detroit we only ever got the annual ones.

Comment by Melanie — May 27, 2007 [AT] 8:05 pm

I have seen lots of cicadas in my neighborhood. This evening my husband and I were out on the driveway and yard around our house and we saw dozens of nymphs coming out of the grass, crawling across our driveway, heading for trees. I went to look for molting nymphs in my neighbor’s garden, and eureka! I saw several in various stages of molting, including one with new wings, another with growing wings, and another literally hanging from its shell. I felt something on my leg while I was standing there, and saw nymphs crawling up my leg!
In the mornings, we see newly grown adults just resting on our house and our deck. They are easy to pick up and I brought a few to school the other day to show my students.
I expected lots of cicadas here (Des Plaines), because seventeen years ago they were very prevalent when I lived just two blocks from where I live now!
However, I haven’t really HEARD them yet!

Comment by Katy Berman — May 27, 2007 [AT] 8:05 pm

We saw thousands at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IL. It’s fair to say the ground was crawling with them.

I’m sending a few pictures to the webmaster.

Comment by Bob Aldaz — May 27, 2007 [AT] 3:48 pm

I didn’t actually see any cicadas, but while driving through Elmhurst & Glen Ellyn this afternoon their unmistakable singing was very loud.

Comment by Lucy — May 27, 2007 [AT] 1:09 pm

I drove to Illinois from Detroit this morning to photograph the cicadas. I didn’t find the numbers I was hoping for but did see a few hundred. I found them in DuPage county at Fullersburg Woods, Maple Grove and York Woods Forest Preserves but the majority were on trees in the Hinsdale business park.

Comment by T. Paul Wrobel — May 26, 2007 [AT] 9:01 pm

I haven’t seen a single Cicada. I Live in Michigan City, Indiana. I was really looking forward to at least hearing a few. Per the Brood 13 map, we are supposed to be getting some, anyone know?

Comment by Michael Hodge — May 25, 2007 [AT] 10:22 pm

Well, I guess Naperville is not old enough for the cicadas. I grew up in Downers Grove and we had many many Cicadas as a kid. Too many corn fields around here. I have not seen one cicadas. Where have all the cicadas gone?? :( :(

Comment by Ray — May 25, 2007 [AT] 8:29 pm

I live in Flossmoor and I have been in this area all my life, so I’ve seen the ’56, ’73, and ’90 cicadas but I have never seen so many seagulls eating cicadas! It’s amazing! They fly down the street in large groups of about 50 birds and devour any cicadas on the ground or on the bottom of the tree trunks.

Comment by Sue — May 25, 2007 [AT] 5:16 pm

We’re in Elmhurst. They first showed up on the morning of the 23rd. There were 11 on our small tree in the front yard. Today, the same tree has over 100! But we’ve got a lot of big trees in our backyard, and holes every 6 to 8 inches in the lawn, and none have emerged there yet, so I think three’s plenty more to come… yikes!

Comment by Mike — May 25, 2007 [AT] 12:05 pm

For those of you that are missing out, come to Villa Park, there are thousands. Most still in shells but in a few days they will all be out. It’s going to be a nightmare, like a Hitchcock movie.

Comment by Sheri — May 25, 2007 [AT] 10:49 am

I found a newly emerged adult cicada coming out of it’s shell this morning in the 200 block of North Kenilworth in Oak Park. This is the first live cicada that I’ve seen this year. I brought it home to let my cats observe and one of my cats, Dino, ate it.

Comment by Rick Pavia — May 25, 2007 [AT] 8:35 am

New Lenox, IL
Finally got a nice showing at dawn (much to our surprise). Our 7 year old old was able to bring in the largest nymph we found getting ready to crawl up a tree along with an adult (in seperate jars) to school. Never seen a crowd of kids gather so fast to check them out! :) 3 year old also enjoyed showing the neighbors a nymph she’s going watch shed.

There were approx. 75 around around our elm tree and many shed skins on most trees we observed in neighboring yards.

Comment by Chrissie — May 25, 2007 [AT] 8:26 am

Highland Park, IL
It has begun… just before dusk last night we spotted several shells near the trees in our yard. Went back outside after dark and you couldn’t walk in the grass without stepping on them. It was quite an amazing site to see all of them navigating their way through the grass towards the nearest tree.

Comment by DV — May 25, 2007 [AT] 7:20 am

we now have 25/30 open shells in the backyard,and around 15 crawling around the house,hope this isn’t all will see.

Comment by j.mayer — May 24, 2007 [AT] 3:19 pm

Elmwood Park, IL.
Saw 3 shells on trees yesterday. Saw about 20 live cicadas on sidewalk at about 10 p.m. They seem to bask in the light of the streetlamp. Saw many shells on the sidewalks in E.P. while driving to work this morning!

Comment by Sandy — May 24, 2007 [AT] 8:56 am

I live in Highland Park. Last night we found 3 cicadas crawling out of their holes. With the warm weather we have been having, I was sure that the major emergence in our area would have occurred last night, but it didn’t. Still waiting…

Comment by DV — May 24, 2007 [AT] 7:00 am

Unfortunately, we won’t see any in Wilmington, even though I live along the river with huge old trees. My neighbors told me the cicadas don’t like Wilmington :-)
Guess I’ll have to travel back to my old neighborhood in Westchester to visit with the grandkids of the cicadas I saw back in ’73.

Comment by Mary B — May 24, 2007 [AT] 6:36 am

I’m also still (impatiently) waiting in Lisle. I practically live in a forest, and I haven’t seen ONE here!

Comment by RG — May 24, 2007 [AT] 5:24 am

I want to see the Cicadas. No sign of them in downtown Naperville yet. Is tonight the night?

Comment by Ray — May 23, 2007 [AT] 9:22 pm

They’re here…..on Glenview, at least. I walked out the back door this morning – there were cicadas and shells everywhere. On the deck, the patio and all of the plants. I turned around and walked right back in! Our neighbor’s lawn had so many in it is looked like the lawn was moving. And I understand the big emergence isn’t until tonight and tomorrow. Ughhh!

Comment by Clare — May 23, 2007 [AT] 1:12 pm

Saw my first-ever magicicada on the Dominican University campus in River Forest just a few minutes ago, on the patio near the library. Haven’t seen any others yet, on campus or at home in Franklin Park.

Comment by Christine — May 23, 2007 [AT] 11:32 am

There were 11 on our tree yesterday. Today, my wife (who was in England in 1990) says she’s trapped in the house… They’re everywhere!

Comment by Mike — May 23, 2007 [AT] 10:28 am

They have just started emerging in Des Plaines, IL. Some shells on sidewalk and saw about 20 on one tree while walking dog. However, not everywhere YET!!
Very exciting!

Comment by Jan — May 23, 2007 [AT] 9:53 am

Noticed first shell on my driveway this AM. Belvidere, IL. I’m in a new sub division without any old trees so this guy had to travel more than 2-3 blocks.

Comment by B.Cihak — May 23, 2007 [AT] 7:35 am

They’re everywhere! Naperville, IL. I spotted thousands in the grass while I was walking my dogs.

Comment by Ben — May 23, 2007 [AT] 7:20 am

I was in the backyard yesterday,05-22.planting some day lillies,dug three small holes,about 8 deep,found five,young’ins just under the surface,west side of wonder lake,il.

Comment by j.mayer — May 23, 2007 [AT] 3:33 am

They were out, just as predicted, this morning in Elmhurst.

Here is a link to photos we took:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/momtogirltwins/

Comment by Kristi — May 22, 2007 [AT] 6:32 pm

We live in Orland Park and went on a cicada hunt last night and were able to find 6! By the time we were going in the house, they were coming out. We could hear the lava rocks in front of our house shifting as they emerged from the ground.

Comment by Kristen — May 22, 2007 [AT] 9:33 am

Thank God! I have not seen them… Lake Station, IN

Comment by Conni — May 22, 2007 [AT] 9:19 am

The last emergence I have seen of Brood XIII was in 1956 (moved from NW Indiana in ’71). I will be back in the Crown Point, IN area the second weekend in June and am looking forward to meeting the Great-grand children of the Magicada I met in 1956.

Comment by Richard Berg — May 22, 2007 [AT] 9:14 am

My students just took a field trip around our school to see if we could find any. We didn’t! We can’t wait. We are in Joliet, Illinois.

Comment by Jill Kelley — May 22, 2007 [AT] 8:59 am

I wish you guys would stop whining about the cicadas. They are beautiful creatures that only grace us with their presence every once every 17 YEARS! I, for one, can’t wait to get home from work so that I can sit outside and take in the beauty of these lovely creatures.

Comment by jt — May 22, 2007 [AT] 8:54 am

Lots started coming out yesterday and today here in Crown Point, IN. All stages. I grew up in Downers Grove and remember my dad shoveling them off the sidewalks with a snow shovel last time they emerged. Was curious to see if we’d see them here, and sure enough, our woods are full : )

Happy watching!

Comment by Crown Point IN — May 22, 2007 [AT] 8:52 am

My wife just called to tell me the cicadas are really starting to come out in Villa Park. She was taking my son for a walk and saw them beginning to cover the trees. I don’t think i want to come home from work today.

Comment by jb — May 22, 2007 [AT] 8:40 am

There are several in our backyard in Homewood (south suburbs) flying around. We saw the first two adults here Saturday, when it was 52 degrees! They almost seemed to have come out early by accident, they were pretty sluggish. I can’t wait to see the emergence really get going here, we had a LOT last time.

Comment by Vera — May 22, 2007 [AT] 8:33 am

Cicadas are so cool! I love finding them in my backyard and I love holding them. How do U know when they r gonna come out next? I totally love there colors and sounds they make so many of my friends hate these things but I don’t see y they aren’t harmfull!! See ya

Comment by Shawna Baker — May 22, 2007 [AT] 8:26 am

Sheri, I’m sorry that you don’t like these things. I find it simply amazing that they do this every 17 years. I wonder how long they’ve been doing this and how they got started. Millions of years??? Anybody know???

I lived in Cicero for the ’73 Cicada emergence. We really didn’t have any coming out of the ground or on trees where we lived. However, we did have a massive swarm one day that was like a black cloud that came through. A friend & I were playing wiffle ball when it happened, so we spent an hour swatting Cicada’s…kids!!!

I live in Westmont. I saw a bunch Sunday in our back back yard. A cold rain put the dampers on them and I saw NONE yesterday after work. NOT SO TODAY!!! They’re coming up out of the ground all over my yard. They’re on trees. They’re coming out of their shell, spreading their wings, and are white at first. I can only imagine the invasion when I get home from work tonight…looking forward to it.

Comment by Mike from Westmont, IL. — May 22, 2007 [AT] 6:56 am

My dog and I saw a few shell casings on our morning walk in Elmhurst, Illinois. Also, she found a still-blonde one in the grass — and ate it!

Comment by Ellen — May 22, 2007 [AT] 5:44 am

My daughter counted 13 in downtown Geneva, IL yesterday (Sunday) while working. 12 shells and 1 flying.

Comment by Bob Aldaz — May 21, 2007 [AT] 7:41 pm

Found a few on a sunny construction fence near my home in Elmhurst, IL – Saturday morning (5/19/2007).

Comment by Vincent Hradil — May 21, 2007 [AT] 10:58 am

None near the Kishwaukee river yet, but expect many as there are forest lands and parks with old trees. Looking for them in Dekalb county.

Comment by Debb — May 21, 2007 [AT] 10:48 am

Saw about 3 doxen cicadas while walking the dog this morning. I’m sure there’s more to come.

Comment by BonnieH — May 21, 2007 [AT] 9:33 am

I moved to Wilmington, IL, just over two years ago and live in a 50+ year old house with 50+ year old trees along the Kankakee River near the Des Plaines Conservation Area. I am sooo looking forward to having the cicadas in my yard, but I’m not sure if I’ll get any. I remember them from the spring of 1973 in Westchester and our yard was covered with them. I hope to see them soon (keeping my fingers crossed).

Comment by Mary B — May 21, 2007 [AT] 7:33 am

I went golfing today (Sunday May 20th) and as I went searching through the woods for my ball, I saw a Cicada sitting on a leaf near a small oak tree. The golf course is located near Henry, IL about 35 miles north of Peoria, IL…

Comment by Derek Scott — May 20, 2007 [AT] 8:33 pm

We live in a home built in 1923 with oak trees all over our front lawn just as old. While gardening on the 5th & 6th of May I noticed wholes appearing in the ground and saw a couple of dead cicadas sitting in them. By the next Monday I had counted over 100 holes in the ground. Today May 20th I saw 4 cicadas already. I think we are getting them WAAAAAY earlier then most, or so it’s sounds like.
Lombard, Illinois

Comment by Kimberly — May 20, 2007 [AT] 7:41 pm

We recently moved to MI and was wondering what parts of the state will see the Cicadas. We had them in WV and they totally freaked me out. We are in the middle of Michigan. Is there any way to check and see when they plan to attack our area? Thanks!

Comment by Carol — May 20, 2007 [AT] 7:39 pm

It’s not cool Mike, it’s terrifying, I’m already starting to hyperventilate. How can you guys be so calm about this, oh yeah, you’re guys. Personally, I don’t want cicadas getting caught in my hair and sticking to my clothes, in the car, etc..

Comment by Sheri — May 20, 2007 [AT] 7:10 pm

I live in Westmont, Illinois. The Cicada’s are coming up in sunny areas. My back backyard is LOADED. I see some coming up here and there in the areas of my property that are mostly shady. The birds are having a treat. And I’m seeing variety of birds that I rarely see going after them. Pretty cool!!!

Comment by Mike — May 20, 2007 [AT] 2:15 pm

A single Magicicada flew into me while I was gardening in my backyard this afternoon in Wheaton, IL. There are no obvious cicada chimneys in my yard, so I’m not sure where he/she came from.

Comment by Cheryl — May 20, 2007 [AT] 12:57 pm

Emegence has begun in Palos Heights, IL. The Forest Preserve accross the street is loaded with cicado. They have already shed their exoskelton and are everywhere. It’s great.

Comment by Sandy — May 20, 2007 [AT] 12:40 pm

Emergence has begun in LaGrange. As of this morning (5/20), we have a sprinling of split shells and adults in various parts of our yard. Expecting many more over the next couple of days. They look great on the salvia and iris!

Comment by Rene — May 20, 2007 [AT] 10:59 am

Mari, In 2004, we had set up 15 sites with different orientations such as south sunny, south shade, north shade, …. The cicadas emerged at the south sunny sites before the shady locations. Also, once the emergence started it continued for several days.

Comment by Gene Kritsky — May 20, 2007 [AT] 6:05 am

On a walk this evening we saw cicada nymphs emerging in Brookfield, IL south of the tracks and west of Prairie Ave. but when we crossed north of the tracks and east of Prairie into Kiwanis Park there were no nymphs emerging. Can the ground temperature be that different just blocks apart?

Comment by Mari — May 19, 2007 [AT] 9:54 pm

I have been anxiously awaiting the arrival of the 17 years cidadas. The Magicicadas began emerging in my yard this morning in Flossmoor, IL. I am located about 25 miles south of Chicago. I live in an older area of Flossmoor and expect a large number to emerge. It’s pretty exciting!

Comment by Sue — May 19, 2007 [AT] 7:51 pm

I thought I was the only cicada nut around! I’ve been talking about these criters since I was pregnant with my first child, summer of 1974. Driving throught Elmhurst in a VW beetle with a manual-control sunroof was quite exciting…expecially down Poplar where there is a canopy of old huge trees over the street. Seventeen years later, I was walking near Elmhurt Hospital when the cicada emerged. Seems like they covered the grass as they marched in unison toward tree trunks. As I recall, each hole was only a few inches from one another. Eventually, every tree trunk in town was litterally covered with cicada. My daughter was a highschooler. Now she’s teaching biology and working toward her PHD. Hope I can plan having the grandkids over at the “special moment” when the cicada emerge again in Elmhurst.

Comment by Kathy — May 18, 2007 [AT] 10:07 pm

I am moving this weekend to the western suburbs of Chicago. I am expecting to see lots and lots of them. I have asked a neighbor of mine if I can borrow her cats for a few weeks. The kitties will have the time of their life with the lil guys. I have their songs playing on my computer all day. Driving my co-workers absolutely nuts.

Comment by Erin — May 17, 2007 [AT] 1:34 pm

We have found a few nymphs while gardening (Northbrook, IL) but have not seen any chimneys yet… they are supposed to arrive May 22. I am obsessed with cicadas!

Comment by Kristina — May 15, 2007 [AT] 11:55 am

snapping off chimneys may decrease their viability.

Comment by Dan — May 14, 2007 [AT] 1:17 pm

As i mow my lawn i have no way of avoiding the chimneys, i step on them and crack them all over the place. does this mean they will die before they emerge?

Comment by jb — May 14, 2007 [AT] 1:06 pm

I say not to snap them off because you don’t want to prematurely expose the nymphs. The tunnels protect from from weather and predators.

Comment by Dan — May 10, 2007 [AT] 2:59 pm

David – the posts from California and Sharon, PA were from last year.

Dan, why shouldn’t we crack off the top of the mud tunnels? I haven’t seen any to do it, but I’d like to know why we shouldn’t (so I can pass along to the kids I work with). Thanks!

Comment by Robin — May 10, 2007 [AT] 2:52 pm

The California cicadas are from an entirely different genus (probably Okanagana) that emerges each spring. They are not periodical, although they are dark-colored with orange like Magicicada. They should not have red eyes.

The Sharon, PA emergences are interesting because there is not supposed to be brood XIII there — if those really are periodical cicadas then they are perhaps very late Brood VIII cicadas?

Comment by David Marshall — May 10, 2007 [AT] 7:35 am

Don’t crack off the top!

Comment by Dan — May 9, 2007 [AT] 4:47 am

We have the empty holes. We have some holes that raccoons seem to have dug up. But I can’t find a cicada anywhere. I’m starting to think its aliens. Where have they gone?

Comment by Kath — May 8, 2007 [AT] 10:29 pm

We’re in Downers Grove, IL. Our entire yard is covered with these little mounds of dirt. If you crack the mound off, you’ll see the cicada sitting there staring up at you. And where there are not mounds, you can scrape the top half inch of dirt off and find tons of holes! We’ve got them EVERYWHERE!!!

Comment by MW — May 8, 2007 [AT] 7:15 pm

It’s actually beneficial to your lawn because they’re aerating it for you! People pay landscaping services $100s of dollars for aerating — the cicadas will do it for free!

Comment by Dan — May 4, 2007 [AT] 7:21 am

Does anyone know if these “chimneys” in my yard will affect my grass? I am 26 years old and don’t really remember the last cicada emergence. I’m in the midst of preparing my house to sell and I’m afraid that these cicadas will ruin my lawn before we sell.

Comment by jb — May 4, 2007 [AT] 6:53 am

After a month of searching, we finally dug up a Periodical Cicada nymph in our own garden in Oak Park, Illinois! We posted information and a photo on our blog: http://cicadablog.saltthesandbox.org/

Thanks to all the other folks who found cicada nymphs and burrows and inspired us to try again.

Eric

Comment by Eric Gyllenhaal — May 2, 2007 [AT] 9:01 pm

Thank you JB in Villa Park – I live in Homewood, south of the city and I was totally upset yesterday when I saw about 30 or more 1/2inch holes in my back yard – as you noted they are like aerations! Didn’t even cross my mind they could be cicadas. I’m still hoping so, as I’m reading about cicada wasps (eat the cicadas) leaving these type holes also.
What an interesting spring/summer we are going to have!

Comment by CJ — May 2, 2007 [AT] 8:33 am

I’m in Wilmette, IL. Was gardening yesterday (Monday) and lifted a path stone. Underneath were about 17 fat wiggling cicadas right under the surface of the stone. Lifted another stone, same story. Also found them in the compost pile. I have also noted some exit holes near the foundation of the house under the shrubbery on the north side.

Comment by Martha Hellander — May 1, 2007 [AT] 9:41 am

I’m in Villa Park, IL and noticed that my lawn had finally been aerated. Upon further inspection, they had not come to aerate yet, but my lawn was full of mounds of dirt and holes. I’ve learned that these cicadas are on their way up. My front yard is FULL of these things.

Comment by jb — April 30, 2007 [AT] 6:21 am

I’m in Chicago Western suburbs, and I was working the garden. There were 10 that I saw less than 1 inch below the surface and I was working in a 6 inch diameter circle. Lots of holes in the dirt as well. I was working in a southwest facing garden, and the sun was very warm today. These guys are raring to go, I think!! I brought me son out to see it and he thought it was totally cool.

I don’t know if I’m ready for them quite yet. I’m supposed to be camping in a few weeks, as well as kayaking. I may have to bring the dental floss!

Comment by HueyGirl — April 28, 2007 [AT] 10:25 am

Ok i just found a magicada! Full size as my daughter was playing with it! lol. I am in Delavan Wisconsin so they are defiently here!

Comment by Jennifer — April 25, 2007 [AT] 8:38 am

A cicada is the fruit of the land. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, sautee it. There’s, um, Cicada kebabs, cicada creole, cicada gumbo, pan fried, deep fried, stir fried. There’s pineapple cicada and lemon cicada, coconut cicada, pepper cicada, cicada soup, cicada stew, cicada salad, cicada and potatoes, cicada burger, cicada sandwich… That’s, that’s about it.

Comment by Jerry — April 24, 2007 [AT] 1:06 pm

Great news Rene!

Comment by Dan — April 24, 2007 [AT] 10:12 am

Today, while gardening in a friend’s yard in SE Elmhurst, I noticed several nickel-sized holes around me. I peeked into one and saw two red eyes staring back at me! This part of her garden is mostly barren, dry clay in a full-sun location. There were no chimneys, just exit holes. I found a dozen of these holes in a 5 x 5 area and the residents were all about 4-6 from the surface. In a spadefull of soil, I found many more active magicicadas near the surface and I carefully replanted them.

Comment by Rene’ — April 23, 2007 [AT] 8:02 pm

Eric — looks that way to me. Looks like a nymph and a mud chimney.

Comment by Dan — April 10, 2007 [AT] 4:28 am

Hi, Dan,

Thanks for all your work spreading the word about cicadas!

My kids and I are trying to beat the late spring rush by finding the earliest periodical cicadas in the Chicago area. Could you help us out by (1) confirming that the live nymph we found last weekend was annual, not periodical, and (2) telling us if you think the burrows we found this weekend are early examples of perioidcal cicada burrows?

The photos are on this page:

http://www.saltthesandbox.org/cicada_hunt/PeriodicalHunt2007.htm

Thanks,

Eric

Comment by Eric Gyllenhaal — April 10, 2007 [AT] 3:37 am

Hi Im from St Charles, MO. I have a bunch of dead cicada’s on my front porch. I hear them day and night in our trees.

July 13, 2007

A cautionary tale: Champ the dog

Filed under: Brood XIII — by @ 5:41 am

This story has been all over the news, so I’m posting it. Champ the drug sniffing dog nearly chokes to death on 4 cicadas (video report). Don’t let your pets gorge themselves on cicadas. Like anything that’s an inch and a half long or longer, cicadas can become lodged in your pet’s throat, so keep a mindful eye on their insect dining habits.

July 11, 2007

Brood XIII wrap up: a new gallery of photos

Filed under: Brood XIII,Magicicada — by @ 7:24 pm

It’s rare for me to set up a new gallery — I’m either very lazy or too busy…

Here’s our one any only 2007 Brood XIII gallery: Jan & Roger’s Brood XIII Magicicada Gallery.

Jan & Roger’s Brood XIII Magicicada Gallery.

Brood XIII wrap up: a few more photos from Joe Balynas

Filed under: Brood XIII,Magicicada — by @ 7:18 pm

Magicicada

Magicicada

View all of Joe Balynas’ Magicicada photos.

July 9, 2007

Brood XIII, rotten but not forgotten

Filed under: Brood XIII — by @ 11:07 am

Brood XIII is all but gone in and few select areas (like Westmont IL for instance). Will you miss them? You might find a couple stragglers next year, but you’re going to have to wait until 2024 for the next Brood XIII emergence.

At this point you should start to see flagging from the Brood XIII cicadas: brown, dead leaves where the cicadas laid their eggs.

There is good news: the Tibicen cicadas are beginning to emerge. Tibicens emerge every year in small numbers — if you’re patient, should be able to find one of these shy cicadas in your yard or local park.

If you’ve willing to travel, you can see and hear the Brood XIV next year too.

Deanna’s cicada photos on Flickr are a nice representation of the Brood XIII emergence. Check them out whenever you want to reminisce.

More Brood XIII photos to come, and lots of other cicada fun is coming up, so stay tuned!

Update: make sure you check out all the cool images people added to Comments section of the CicadaMania MySpace page.

July 3, 2007

Cicadas (and me) on Fuji Network News

Filed under: Brood XIII,Pop Culture,Video — by @ 7:32 am

A few of you might have noticed the film crew following me around the Cicada Mania festival. They filmed me at the festival, as well as back in Jersey — a once in a life time (or maybe once in 17 years) experience. The news cast aired yesterday in Japan, but you might be able to see it on a show called “Morning Eye” in North America.

Here is the final news story:

Roy Troutman, Gerry Bunker and Joe Green also appear in the video.

June 27, 2007

The final winner in the blue eyed cicada contest

Filed under: Brood XIII,Eye Color — by @ 5:18 pm

Michael Jimms sent us this photo of a blue eyed Magicicada:

blue eyed cicada

Michael won the last button in the blue/white/gray eyed cicada category.

Congratulations to all the winners. There are still prizes left in the contest: for Multi Colored Eyed cicadas, and for an emerging nymph with white eyes. Good luck.

June 25, 2007

2 more cicada contest winners

Filed under: Brood XIII,Eye Color — by @ 3:54 pm

A creamy white eyed cicada from Morton Grove by Judy Thorpe:

White eyed cicada

And…

A true-blue eyed cicada from Western Springs by Matt Weiss:

Blue eyed cicada

June 21, 2007

Another Blue/White Eye Contest Winner

Filed under: Brood XIII,Eye Color,Magicicada — by @ 6:35 am

Here’s a white eyed cicada from Grayson Martin.

White Eyed cicada

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