Cicada Mania

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June 29, 2021

Jennifer Angus: Magicicada, a cicada art exhibit at the Staten Island Museum

Filed under: Art | Magicicada | William T. Davis — Dan @ 10:47 am

The Staten Island Museum is home to William T. Davis’ massive collection of cicadas and other insects. A new exhibition of insect-based art opens July 16 at the Staten Island Museum, by artist Jennifer Angus.

Jennifer Angus 2
Art by Jennifer Angus.

Here’s the press release.

For Immediate Release

Jennifer Angus: Magicicada
New exhibition of insect-based art opens July 16 at the Staten Island Museum

(Staten Island, NY – June 29, 2021) As Brood X wanes, cicadas emerge anew at the Staten Island Museum with Jennifer Angus: Magicicada, a new exhibition opening Friday, July 16 2021 and running through May 22, 2022.

Magicicada is an immersive exhibit featuring exquisite ornamental patterns and imaginative vignettes created by artist Jennifer Angus using hundreds of preserved insects. Taking inspiration from the Museum’s collection of cicadas- one of the world’s largest- the installation will feature over two dozen species of cicada, including Brood X periodical cicadas, or Magicicadas, collected during the 2021 emergence.

“Cicadas, and Magicicada in particular, have a deep connection and meaning to the Staten Island Museum. Founder William T. Davis was the cicada expert during his lifetime and was even the one who coined the name Magicicada, capturing the wonder of the periodical cicadas’ mass emergences and long disappearances. It is especially poignant that this exhibit is opening as we are also remerging into the world after a time of darkness. I am hopeful that it can bring people a sense of joy and wonder after a time of profound loss.” Colleen Evans, Staten Island Museum Director of Natural Science.

Using responsibly collected and preserved specimens, Angus creates site-specific installations with hundreds of insects pinned directly to walls, creating patterns reminiscent of textiles or wallpaper. Up close, the installations reveal themselves to be comprised of actual insects, often species that are not traditionally considered beautiful. Angus’s installations also include Victorian-style insect dioramas in antique furniture and bell jars. Her work motivates viewers to find beauty in unexpected places and to understand the importance of insects and other creatures to our world.

In preparation for this exhibit, Angus spent time in the Museum’s extensive natural history collections to help shape the finished show. Select objects and specimens from the natural science collection, including retired collection storage and historic taxidermy, will be featured throughout the gallery amidst Angus’s fanciful arthropod arrangements. During the spring Brood X emergence, she traveled to Princeton, NJ along with the Museum’s Director of Natural Science, Colleen Evans, and Joseph Yoon from Brooklyn Bugs to observe and collect cicadas for the show.

Artist Jennifer Angus states: “I often say that the meat and potatoes of my installations are cicadas. They come big and small. Tropical species often can have colourful wings causing many people to assume they are moths, but unlike those insects, cicadas are tough, hardy creatures standing up to repeated use in my art installations. I could not have been more delighted when the SIM contacted me, and I learned of founder William T. Davis’ passion for cicadas which were an under documented species in his day. I have had the privilege of exploring the SIM’s collection, the one of the largest of cicadas in the world, and have been inspired by these mysterious creatures who spend most of their lives underground but upon emerging let us all know of their presence with loud calls. That Brood X periodical cicadas have emerged this year as well is a joyous event and has brought considerable notice to cicadas. I deeply appreciate the assistance provided by the SIM’s staff in working with me to celebrate the cicada.”

Magicicada is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Staten Island Museum is supported in part by public funds provided through the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and by the New York State Council on the Arts.

Exhibition Related Programing

Brood X Sounding Off: Saturday, July 17, 2 pm – 3 pm
Cicada Talk with Colleen Evans, Director of Natural Science

Virtual Artist Talk: Sunday, September 19, 3 pm-4 pm
Registration Required

Staten Island Museum is located on the grounds of Snug Harbor Cultural Center, 1000 Richmond Terrace, Building A, Staten Island, NY 10301.

About the Artist:

Jennifer Angus is a professor in the Design Studies department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she teaches in the Textile and Apparel Design Program. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and her Master of Fine Arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Jennifer has exhibited work throughout the world and at galleries such as the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery in Washington D.C. and the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, PA.

Jennifer Angus
Art by Jennifer Angus.

June 27, 2021

The Evolutionary Origin of Periodical Cicadas: A Sci-Fi Story by Jin Yoshimura

Filed under: Jin Yoshimura | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 8:09 am

Here’s a video from Jin Yoshimura who researches periodical cicadas.

The Evolutionary Origin of Periodical Cicadas: A Sci-Fi Story:

The Evolutionary Origin of Periodical Cicadas: A Sci-Fi Story:
Periodical cicadas are known for their unique 17- and 13-year life cycles and mass emergence events. This mystery of why they would have evolved these two prime-numbered life cycles has attracted many biologists and mathematicians. Dr. Yoshimura will explore this phenomenon

June 12, 2021

Okanagana aurantiaca Davis, 1917

Filed under: Okanagana | Tibicinini | William T. Davis — Tags: — Dan @ 8:57 am

Okanagana aurantiaca Davis, 1917.

From Davis’ 2020 Key

A. Male uncus not hooked at the extremity, sometimes sinuate.

B. Expanse of fore wings more than 50 mm.

CC. The base of the fore and hind wings not of the usual orange-red variegated with black.

Body and wing venation nearly entirely orange; basal cell of fore wings clear; a black band between the eyes, and a conspicuous dorsal band of the same color extending from the hind margin of the pronotum to the end of the abdomen.

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Tibicinini
Subtribe: Tibicinina
Genus: Okanagana
Species: Okanagana aurantiaca Davis, 1917.

List of sources

  1. Davis, William T. Cicadas of the genera Okanagana, Tibicinoides and Okanagodes, with descriptions of several new species. Journal of the New York Entomological Society. v27. 179-223. 1919. Link.

June 8, 2021

Platypedia putnami survey at Horsetooth Mountain Open Space by Tim McNary

Filed under: Platypedia | Platypediini | Proto-periodical | Tim McNary — Tags: — Dan @ 6:12 pm

Here’s a short 2021 update for the Platypedia putnami survey at Horsetooth Mountain Open Space, west of Fort Collins, Colorado. 2021 is turning out to be a very large emergence for this cicada, and it’s not through yet! The survey transect goes from the trailhead parking lot to Horsetooth Falls. Although the first exuvia found was on May 22, 2021, the bulk of the exuvia, so far, have emerged (153 of 201 exuvia) June 5-8th. “Clicking” of adults can be heard in many areas, but is concentrated in certain sites.

Tim McNary
Fort Collins, CO

Here are the mega data on exuvia found each year:
2009- 136 exuvia
2010- 0
2011- 3
2012- 2
2013- 179
2014- 0
2015- 12
2016- 0
2017- 0
2018- 13
2019- 2
2020- 0
2021- 201 (exuvia through June 8, 2021)

Links:

March 21, 2021

Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition by Gene Kritsky

Filed under: Books | Gene Kritsky | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 11:00 am

Renowned cicada researcher Gene Kritsky, PhD., has a new book out: Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition. It is available for Kindle and paperback on Amazon.com. Now’s the time to get it.

Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition

Gene is also has a new link for the Cicada Safari App.

January 24, 2021

Cicadas @ UCONN, a new Cicada website

Filed under: John Cooley | Magicicada | Periodical | United States — Dan @ 9:12 pm

Magicicada.org was an amazing website filled with information about Magicicada periodical cicadas and backed by cicada expert, John Cooley.

The site now has a new address and look: Cicadas @ UCONN (https://cicadas.uconn.edu/). Bookmark it in preparation for the 2021 Brood X emergence.

Cicadas @ UCONN

UCONN (University of Connecticut) has other cicada websites such as The Simon Lab and Cicada Central.

January 16, 2021

Three new species of cicadas from Meghalaya, India

Filed under: Dundubiini | India | Mata | Vivek Sarkar — Dan @ 9:45 pm

Three new species of cicadas have been discovered in Meghalaya, India:
Mata meghalayana, Mata lenonia, and Mata ruffordii.

Mata cicadas  Vivek Sarkar
Photo courtesy of Vivek Sarkar.

Access the paper on Research Gate or Zootaxa Vol 4908, No 1.

Paper title: Description of three new species of the genus Mata Distant, 1906 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Oncotympanini) with notes on their natural history from the Indian state of Meghalaya, India

Authors: Vivek Sarkar, Cuckoo Mahapatra, Pratyush P. Mohapatra, Manoj V. Nair, Krushnamegh Kunte

Abstract: “Three new species of the Asian genus Mata Distant, 1906 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) viz. Mata lenonia sp.nov.; Mata ruffordii sp.nov. and Mata meghalayana sp.nov. are described from the Indian state of Meghalaya. Keys and taxonomic descriptions of these species are provided with detailed accounts of their natural history and acoustics.”

January 1, 2021

The Philacicada Society

Filed under: Charles Remington | Chris Simon | Cicada Mania | Folklore | Gene Kritsky | Ivan Huber — Tags: — Dan @ 12:38 pm

The Philacicada Society existed for a brief time (to my knowledge) in the 1990s. There was at least one mail (NOT email) newsletter (I’ll eventually photocopy it).

The information here is over 20 years old — don’t try to join. :)

Here’s the original information:

I’m excited to announce the formation of the Philacicada Society. Cicada maniacs, please read on! (Special thanks to Dr. Ivan Huber and Charles Remington.)

“The huge scientific and public enthusiasm for Magicicada Brood II this year included some queries about a simple organization (and newsletter) devoted toMagicicada and perhaps other cicadas (around 4,000 species are known worldwide).In response, I agreed to do some initial organizational work, and Professor IvanHuber, of Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey, volunteered to edit a cicada newsletter.”

“You are hereby invited to become a charter member of this relatively informal society. You will join by sending to Treasurer Kritsky $5.00 as dues, to cover any minimal expenses.”

“The Newsletter would be perhaps quarterly and would contain anything appropriate, certainly including:”

  1. suggestions for observations and experiments;

  2. brief reports of interesting findings (full scientific papers to be published of course in the usual formal journals);

  3. suggestions and plans for producing greatly needed book(s) on cicadas for the respected “intelligent layman”, including children, and for the entomological world (maybe a rush Magicicada Manual with a few different specialists doing different chapters); Gene Kritsky, Tom Moore, and Monte Lloydhave books moving toward publication; Magicicadais arguably the most biologically remarkable insect (even animal or organism?) in the world; the superb new Williams & Simon review is a basic reference and bibliography;

  4. requests for research help — livestock, etc.;

  5. planning for observing forthcoming hatches– Brood III, IV, etc.


“To emphasize a serious commitment to the Society and to organize mutual input, there is a need for informal charter officers and directors. I took the liberty of asking leading Magicicada workers to serve on such a Board, and they agreed. Sucha Board is as follows:

Chairman: Chris Simon
Treasurer: Gene R. Kritsky
Editor: Ivan Huber

Directors:
James & Maxine Health
Edward Johnson
Richard Karban
Monte Lloyd
Chris T. Maier
Thomas E. Moore
Charles L. Remington
Allen F. Sanborn
Kimberly G. Smith
Kathy S. Williams

In the future, more formality may be wanted in choosing officers and directors, including some cicada workers outside the U.S.A.

Please send Gene Kritsky names and addresses of possible members, to be circularized.

Cordially,

Charles Remington

Here is the form for joining the society. Print it out and mail it in.

old Philacicada society form

September 13, 2020

Australian Cicada Names 🇦🇺

Filed under: Australia | David Emery | L. W. Popple | Nathan Emery — Dan @ 1:01 am

This page features information about common cicadas of Australia, researchers, and websites dedicated to the cicadas of Australia. Australia has the best cicada names!

Cyclochila australasiae

Cyclochila australasiae can be found in eastern Queensland, NSW and Victoria, and most emerge between September & December1, but peaking in November2.

All Cyclochila australasiae info on this site.

Green Grocer morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae) photo by Bron
Photo by Bron.

Green Grocer morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Kevin Lee's Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by Kevin Lee. Yellow-Green Green Grocer with Mask.

Yellow Monday morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Yellow Monday (Cyclochila australasiae) photos by Tom Katzoulopolopoulous.
Photo by Tom Katzoulopolopoulous.

Blue Moon morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Cyclochila australasiae, Blue Moon, by David Emery
Photo by David Emery.

Masked Devil morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Masked Devil cicada (Cyclochila australasiae). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Cherrynose or Whiskey Drinker (Macrotristria angularis)

The Cherry Nose cicada can be found in Eastern Queensland, NSW, and a small part of South Australia, and is found November-February1, but is most common in December2.

Cherry Nose cicada (Macrotristria angularis). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Bagpipe Cicada (Lembeja paradoxa)

The Bagpipe cicada can be found in the Northern tip of Queensland1, from October to February, but they’re most common during January2.

Lembeja paradoxa (Karsch, 1890). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Floury Baker (Aleeta curvicosta)

The Floury Baker can be found along the coast of Queensland & NSW. Adults are most common in late December and January1.

Floury Baker by Michelle Thompson
Photo by Michelle Thompson.

Golden Emperor (Anapsaltoda pulchra)

When is it out: Nov-Jan.

Anapsaltoda pulchra - Golden Emperors. Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)

The Double Drummer can be found in parts of eastern Queensland and Eastern NSW, from November to early March1. Peaks in December.

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)
Photo by Dan.

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata)

When is it out: January.

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata) photos by Jodi from 2007. Australia.
Photo by Jodi.

White Drummer (Arunta perulata)

The White Drummer cicada can be found in eastern Queensland and NSW, from November to April, but they are most common during December and January1.

White Drummer cicada (Arunta perulata). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Bladder Cicada (Cystosoma saundersii)

The Bladder Cicada can be sound in eastern Queensland & NSW1, can be found September-January, peaking in October2.

Bladder cicadas (Cystosoma saundersii)
Photo by David Emery.

Redeye cicada (Psaltoda moerens)

The Redeye cicada can be found in eastern NSW, Victoria, and Tasmania, and are most abundant in late November and December1, but can be found until February2.

Redeye cicada (Aleeta curvicosta). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

More interesting names:

  • Brown Bunyip (Tamasa tristigma) [Brown Bunyip]
  • Typewriter (Pauropsalta extrema) [picture]
  • Sandgrinder (Arenopsaltria fullo) [picture]

Black Prince/Silver Knight (Psaltoda plaga)

Tiger Prince (Macrotristria godingi)

Tettigarcta White, 1845

Tettigarctidae sp.
Tettigarcta tomentosa.

Diemeniana Distant, 1906

The Diemeniana euronotiana can be found in eastern NSW, south-eastern Victoria, and Tasmania. They are most common in late November to January1.


Diemeniana euronotiana. Photo by David Emery.

Date and location:
1 Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990.
2 iNaturalist.com.

Researchers & resources:

David Emery

David Emery is a cicada researcher and has contributed many of the images you see on this website.

Use this amazing image by David Emery to identify some of the most well-known Australian cicada species:

Aussie cicadas 1 (3)

Nathan Emery

Nathan Emery released a cicada book called “A photo guide to the common cicadas of the Greater Sydney Region”. You can buy it online.
A photo guide to the common cicadas of the Greater Sydney Region

Dr. Popple

M.S. Moulds

Websites

  • Common names of Australian insects.
  • Atlas of Living Australia Cicada page.
  • Brisbane Cicadas.
  • Narelle Power’s Cicada Photos.
  • Scribbly Gum’s The Summer of Signing Cicadas.
  • Morwell National Park Online.
  • Laura Imbruglia sings songs that mention Green Grocers and Yellow Mondays on her album “It Makes a Crunchy Noise”.
  • (more…)

    August 23, 2020

    Four new species of cicadas in the Yoyetta abdominalis (Distant) species group

    Filed under: Australia | David Emery | L. W. Popple | Yoyetta — Dan @ 12:44 pm

    Four new cicadas described in Australia! Here are the details:

    Paper: Four new species of cicadas in the Yoyetta abdominalis (Distant) species group (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae) from southeastern Australia
    Abstract:

    Four new species are added to the Yoyetta abdominalis (Distant) species group: Y. douglasi sp. nov., Y. enigmatica sp. nov., Y. loftyensis sp. nov., and Y. ngarabal sp. nov. Calling song descriptions and morphological descriptions are provided for each species. An updated key to male specimens is also provided for the species group.

    Author: Lindsay W. Popple; David L. Emery
    Year: 2020
    Journal: Records of the Australian Museum
    Publisher: The Australian Museum
    Link: https://journals.australian.museum/popple-2020-rec-aust-mus-724-123147/
    More info on Dr. Popple’s website: Restless Firetail, Mt Lofty Firetail, Glade Firetail, and Grampians Firetail.

    More »