Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

Cicada T-shirts

May 3, 2024

Cicada T-Shirt of the Day: Cicada Summer

Filed under: Cicada Mania — Dan @ 6:58 pm

Cicada t-shirt of the day: Cicada Summer.

Periodical cicadas will be dead before summer.

Time to enjoy the summertime cicadas that few people know exist. Do you need a t-shirt that needs at least 15 minutes of explanation? What’s a cicada? What is it drinking? What does it have a wasp swatter (search for Cicada Killer Wasp)? What does MPF stand for (Massospora Protection Factor)? Embrace the weird.

Summer

April 29, 2024

Cicada t-shirt of the day: Massospora Activated

Filed under: Cicada Mania | Massospora — Dan @ 7:57 pm

Another cicada t-shirt that you can buy is Massospora Activated!

MASSOSPORA activated

What is the meaning of this?! Well, Magicicada periodical cicadas contract a fungus called Massospora cicadina during sexual contact. It turns their rumps into a white chalky mess and sends them into a mating frenzy.

Learn more about Massospora cicadina:

Cicada t-shirt of the day: Frozen Cicada

Filed under: Cicada Mania — Dan @ 7:34 pm

On Zazzle now, you can get the Frozen Cicada t-shirt.

Frozen Cicada

I use this image when periodical cicadas emerge and then the weather gets cold, occasionally killing them or sending them into a state of torpor.

Not quite frozen, but here’s a story about some sub-50 degrees Fahrenheit cicada blues: Rainy day Magicicada behavior.

October 27, 2023

2024 Cicada Forecast

Filed under: Brood XIII | Brood XIX | Cicada Mania — Dan @ 9:17 pm

Updated on 5/30/2024.

2024 is the big year in the U.S.A. Two Magicicada Broods, Brood XIII (Thirteen) and Brood XIX (Nineteen, aka the Great Southern Brood) have emerged in the United States. People call these cicadas “locusts”, but they are cicadas.

Get ready for a zillion of these (if you’re in the right location):
Brood X header

Here’s a chart that shows where Brood XIX and Brood XIII are in their emergence cycle:

May 30th Update

about Brood XIX (WHICH HAS EMERGED and IS STARTING TO DIE OFF):

Brood XIX has a 13-year cycle, features four species, and is found in:

Alabama, north-west half of Arkansas, north-west Georgia, southeast Iowa, southern Illinois, south-west Indiana, western Kentucky, northern Louisiana, Maryland in St. Mary’s County, Missouri, Mississippi, central North Carolina, eastern Oklahoma, western South Carolina, Tennessee, eastern Virginia.

Big cities in the range of Brood XIX include Nashville (TN), Charlotte (NC), and St. Louis (MO), keeping in mind that they prefer the suburbs.

Read lots more about Brood XIX.

about Brood XIII (WHICH HAS EMERGED):

Brood XIII has a 17-year cycle, features three species, and is found in:

Eastern Iowa, northern Illinois, Indiana, near Lake Michigan, and southern Wisconsin. Though likely extinct, the brood once appeared in Michigan along the border with Indiana.

The largest city in Brood XIII is Chicago, Illinois, and the Lake County Forest Preserve in the suburbs of Chicago is a good place to visit for tourists. The Michigan part of the brood is likely extinct, so do not look there if you are a tourist.

Read lots more about Brood XIII.

Will the broods overlap?

They do not overlap! But, they come close in some areas.

Both Brood XIX and XIII exist in Macon, Sangamon, Livingston, and Logan counties in Illinois. The easily accessible place they come closest to overlapping is Springfield, Illinois, which is in Sangamon County. Compare this Brood XIII map with this Brood XIX.

People wonder what would happen if members of the broods mate. Their offspring would likely live and adopt either a 13 or 17-year life cycle. This will likely not happen because they don’t overlap, however, one experiment would be to get similar species from XIX and XIII and put them in an enclosure to see if they will mate.

Resources to get you through 2024

  1. A Tale of Two Broods: The 2024 Emergence of Periodical Cicada Broods XIII and XIX book by Dr. Gene Kritsky.
  2. The Cicada Safari app for iOS and Android to find and report cicadas.
  3. The University of Connecticut Periodical Cicadas website.
  4. An iNaturalist project was set up to track them.

Stragglers from other broods:

Magicicada stragglers from other broods will emerge in small numbers.

So far Brood XXIII and Brood XIV stragglers have been reported!

Annually emerging cicada species of North America:

Follow the progress of annual cicadas on our iNaturalist project.

In the United States, annual cicada emergences will happen like they did in 2023, with few surprises. Cicadas in southern locations will emerge first, with Quesada gigas emerging early on. Look at the chart on the cicada sounds page for a calendar of annual cicada emergences.

The cicadas that have a camouflage appearance are Neotibicen, like Neotibicen linnei aka Linne’s Cicada, or Megatibicen, Megatibicen resh aka Resh Cicada, and they are annual cicadas.

July 23 (small) 3
A Neotibicen tibicen is perhaps the most common annual cicada in North America.

Proto-periodical cicadas of North America (the fly fisher’s friend):

Emergences of proto-periodical cicadas depend on multiple factors including the species, crowding, location, and cumulative rainfall, making it hard to predict when they will emerge. We can’t say exactly when they’ll emerge in your location. Platypedia species, in particular, represent a “boon” to fly fishers, as they send fish into a feeding frenzy. The best bet for Platypedia cicadas is to tune into iNaturalist from April to June.

Platypedia
A Platypedia cicada, photo by CGWiber.

International species — World Wide Cicadas

A variety of cicadas

Generally speaking, cicadas in the Northern Hemisphere emerge somewhere between March and September, and in the Southern Hemisphere, somewhere between September and March. In places closer to the equator, like Ecuador, you can have cicadas for almost the entire year. You can use sites like iNaturalist and Cicada Mania to do research. iNaturalist compiles cicada identifications, including photos, sounds, and geographic data. Cicada Mania contains basic facts and historical and cultural knowledge.

There are periodical species of cicadas in Fiji and India. UPDATE! The “Leap-Year” brood of the Indian periodical cicada Chremistica ribhoi is currently emerging in the Kamrup District of Assam, India (4/25/2024).

iNaturalist by continent

on Cicada Mania by continent

You can also explore specific countries like…

iNaturalist by country:

on Cicada Mania by country:

More to come. Here is the 2023 Forecast.

April 18, 2021

Cicada Mania BINGO for Brood X 2021

Filed under: Cicada Mania | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 5:48 am

Here’s something fun: Cicada Mania BINGO. Use this BINGO card to keep track of everything you see, hear or do in context to the Brood X emergence. Here’s a PDF version. Tips below the image of the card:

Cicada Mania

Tips:

  1. Pictures of cicada Holes and Chimneys
  2. Magicicada septendecim photos & song
  3. A cicada with white eyes
  4. Cicadas with blue and yellow eyes
  5. Video of Cicada Nymphs at Night
  6. Cicadas with Massospora cicadina fungus infections
  7. Magicicada septendecula photos & songs
  8. Cicada eggs and young nymphs
  9. Are cicadas safe to eat?
  10. Magicicada cassini photos & songs
  11. Video of a cicada laying eggs
  12. Links to the Cicada Safari app.
  13. Cicada songs, including Choruses
  14. Wing Flicks Videos

I’ll probably do a version for summertime cicadas too.

January 1, 2021

The Philacicada Society

Filed under: Charles Remington | Chris Simon | Cicada Mania | Folklore | Gene Kritsky | Ivan Huber — Tags: — Dan @ 12:38 pm

The Philacicada Society existed for a brief time (to my knowledge) in the 1990s. There was at least one mail (NOT email) newsletter (I’ll eventually photocopy it).

The information here is over 20 years old — don’t try to join. 🙂

Here’s the original information:

I’m excited to announce the formation of the Philacicada Society. Cicada maniacs, please read on! (Special thanks to Dr. Ivan Huber and Charles Remington.)

“The huge scientific and public enthusiasm for Magicicada Brood II this year included some queries about a simple organization (and newsletter) devoted toMagicicada and perhaps other cicadas (around 4,000 species are known worldwide).In response, I agreed to do some initial organizational work, and Professor IvanHuber, of Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey, volunteered to edit a cicada newsletter.”

“You are hereby invited to become a charter member of this relatively informal society. You will join by sending to Treasurer Kritsky $5.00 as dues, to cover any minimal expenses.”

“The Newsletter would be perhaps quarterly and would contain anything appropriate, certainly including:”

  1. suggestions for observations and experiments
  2. brief reports of interesting findings (full scientific papers to be published of course in the usual formal journals)
  3. suggestions and plans for producing greatly needed book(s) on cicadas for the respected “intelligent layman”, including children, and for the entomological world (maybe a rush Magicicada Manual with a few different specialists doing different chapters); Gene Kritsky, Tom Moore, and Monte Lloydhave books moving toward publication; Magicicadais arguably the most biologically remarkable insect (even animal or organism?) in the world; the superb new Williams & Simon review is a basic reference and bibliography
  4. requests for research help — livestock, etc.
  5. planning for observing forthcoming hatches– Brood III, IV, etc.

“To emphasize a serious commitment to the Society and to organize mutual input, there is a need for informal charter officers and directors. I took the liberty of asking leading Magicicada workers to serve on such a Board, and they agreed. Sucha Board is as follows:

Chairman: Chris Simon
Treasurer: Gene R. Kritsky
Editor: Ivan Huber

Directors:
James & Maxine Health
Edward Johnson
Richard Karban
Monte Lloyd
Chris T. Maier
Thomas E. Moore
Charles L. Remington
Allen F. Sanborn
Kimberly G. Smith
Kathy S. Williams

In the future, more formality may be wanted in choosing officers and directors, including some cicada workers outside the U.S.A.

Please send Gene Kritsky names and addresses of possible members, to be circularized.

Cordially,
Charles Remington

Here is the form for joining the society. Print it out and mail it in.

old Philacicada society form

Dan’s Cicada Diary for 1996

Filed under: Brood II | Cicada Mania | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 12:05 pm

Here’s something I wrote in 1996 to chronicle the Brood II cicada emergence in 1996. It’s probably meant to be semi-humorous.

Dan’s Cicada Diary for 1996.

Sunday, May 19th: Metuchen, New Jersey; I found the first desiccated cicada nymph exoskeleton on my patio. My cat disappears.

Tuesday, May 21st: I found about 40 nymph exoskeletons on my patio, a pine tree, and a maple tree. I also spotted an adult climbing the maple and two crippled adults rolling about the base of the tree.

Wednesday, May 22nd: Bonanza! I found about 500 adults perched on just about everything in my yard: trees, patio furniture, the foundation of my home, the garden hose, garbage cans, the missing cat’s water dish, my hair…just plain everywhere! Gruesome!

Saturday, May 25th: Avenel, New Jersey; Party at the Ritzow’s. Literally, hundreds of adult cicadas perched high above in oak trees sneer at decadent humans sipping martini’s, playing croquet. Bourgeois homo sapiens…bah humbug!

Thursday, May 30th: Metuchen, New Jersey; Still no sign of the cat. Sitting outside on my patio around 8:30 pm I hear a “snap”, “crackle” and “popping” sound. Rice Crispies? No. More like cicadas nymphs crawling out of their holes and onto my garden wall to molt into adulthood. Not the loveliest sight.

Saturday, June 1st: Westfield, New Jersey; Dave Wilson and Claire Adas’ wedding. A beautiful ceremony and reception, with the exception of the 9000 uninvited cicadas: crawling up people’s legs, crunching underfoot, landing in refreshments…a moment to cherish and remember!

Tuesday, June 4th: North Edison, New Jersey; The cicadas have begun to sing! All together they sound like a Boeing 767 is circling 40 feet overhead. The sound is that awesome. 10 inch deep piles of dying post-coitus adults litter the base of trees. The invasion has only begun!

Wednesday, June 5th – Monday, June 17th: Metuchen, North Edison, Colonia, Avenel, New Jersey; The invasion is in full effect! Homeowners in North Edison and Colonia report having to haul away the dying bodies of cicadas inwheelbarrows! Residents describe the cicadas’ combined mating screams as “loud as a UFO” [how do they know what a UFO sounds like?] and “like a Mack Truck was floating ten foot above your head”! Someone even told me cicadas taste like shrimp! I guess they made the best of a bad situation.

Wednesday, June 26th: Metuchen, New Jersey; It appears the invasion is over. All that remains is the dismembered, rotting corpses and the memories, sweet, sweet, memories. But remember, They’ll be back…in the year 2013!

Saturday, August 3rd: Metuchen, New Jersey; Looking out my second-story window I can clearly see the damage done by the 17-year cicadas. Brown patches of dead leaves speckle local oak and maple trees, revealing the branches where the female cicada has chosen to lay her eggs; an interesting “natural disaster”, but, not as heart-breaking as an earthquake or a flood. Clearly, the most provocative news regarding cicadas is the current hatch of annual cicadas, which are larger than the “17-year” cicadas (thoroughly illustrated within this web page) and greener. Another dissimilarity is the difference in their respective mating calls: while the “17-year” cicada makes a whirring sound somewhere between the motor of a vacuum cleaner and a car alarm, the “annual” cicada sounds more like a lawn sprinkler or maybe a sewing machine. Although I can clearly hear hundreds of “annual” cicadas and I have found their shells, I haven’t visually located a single one! Another cicada-related event has been the recent hatch of “cicada killer” wasps. These two-inch long giant wasps only prey upon, our friend, the defenseless cicada. I haven’t located these creatures either, but, they are definitely out there. Cicadas beware!

Wednesday, August 26th: Metuchen, New Jersey; the Tibicen cicadas continue to sing…

Wednesday, November 6th: Metuchen, New Jersey; they are all dead or sucking on roots underground.

The 17-Year Cicada – Something I wrote in 1997

Filed under: Cicada Mania | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 12:00 pm

This is from my “Cicada Humor” page from 1996-1997. It’s semi-humorous. For serious information visit the facts-only 17-year cicada page.

The 17-Year Cicada

Every 17 years a fearsome biological monstrosity drags its way to the surface of the earth. It comes only to mate and spawn; however, it imparts terror and disgust in the hearts and minds of every man, woman, child, and beast unfortunate enough to cross its path. This is no Hollywood fantasy, ladies and gentlemen, this creature is real, horribly real! Cast your trembling eyes upon mother nature’s most disturbing insectoid aberration…T

The Cicada a.k.a. “The 17-Year Locust”
July 17th, 1997

Seriously, folks, the cicada isn’t a locust, it’s, well, a cicada (a member of the Homoptera order of insects). These charming creatures are best known for their intense mating call, which sounds more or less like a lawn sprinkler, or a miniature AH-64 Apache Black Helicopter. When 10,000 or so of these suckers start screaming in your neighborhood you’ll think you’re in the middle of Apocalypse Now. Nowisthe time! Depending on where you live, these heinous herbivores should be dive-bombing your friends and family any day now.

Actually, they are more likely tofallout of a tree thanfly, but, rest assured, they will be landing somewhere on your body sometime soon.

Ilive in central New Jersey and right now we are up to our mandibles in a plague of these sap slurping oddities. Some breeds, including the green/yellow striped cicadas, rear their ugly heads every year, but, fortunately not in great numbers. The “periodic”, black-bodied, red-eyed, spawn of Beelzebub cicadas only present themselves once every 17 years;unfortunately,there are literally millions of them. Worst of all, they have a face, just like you or me!

Periodic cicadas live to be 17 years old (13 years in southern states), which means they’re the only insect that qualifies for a driver’s license in New Jersey. Actually, these creatures only spend two to four weeks of their lives as an adult. They spend the first 17 years underground sucking on roots! Exciting! Once the adults have mated, the female drills a hole in a tree branch with her butt (technically her ovipositor) and lays her eggs. The eggs soon hatch and the “nymphs” fall to the ground where they feed on root sap. As soon as the adults mate they croak and drop to the ground where they will decay and stink. If I were you I wouldn’t hang out under any trees this year. In the end, your best offense will be a shovel and a bucket, or, a hungry golden retriever.

Dan’s Cicada Diary for 1996

  1. Sunday, May 19th: Metuchen, New Jersey; I found the first desiccated cicada nymph exoskeleton on my patio. My cat disappears.
  2. Tuesday, May 21st: I found about 40 nymph exoskeletons on my patio, a pine tree and a maple tree. I also spotted an adult climbing the maple and two crippled adults rolling about the base of the tree.
  3. Wednesday, May 22nd: Bonanza! I found about 500 adults perched on just about everything in my yard: trees, patio furniture, the foundation of my home, the garden hose, garbage cans, the missing cat’s water dish, my hair…just plain everywhere! Gruesome!
  4. Saturday, May 25th: Avenel, New Jersey; Party at the Ritzow’s. Literally hundreds of adult cicadas perched high above in oak trees sneer at decadent humans sipping martini’s, playing croquet. Bourgeois homosapiens…bah humbug!
  5. Thursday, May 30th: Metuchen, New Jersey; Still no sign of the cat. Sitting outside on my patio around 8:30pm I hear a “snap”, “crackle” and “popping” sound. Rice Crispies? No. More like cicadas nymphs crawling out of their holes and on to my garden wall to molt into adult hood. Not the loveliest sight.
  6. Saturday, June 1st: Westfield, New Jersey; Dave Wilson and Claire Adas’ wedding. A beautiful ceremony and reception, with the exception of the 9000 uninvited cicadas: crawling up peoples legs, crunching underfoot, landing in refreshments…a moment to cherish and remember!
  7. Tuesday, June 4th: North Edison, New Jersey; The cicadas have begun to sing! All together they sound like a Boeing 767 is circling 40 feet overhead. The sound is that awesome. 10 inch deep piles of dying post coitus adults litter the base of trees. The invasion has only begun!
  8. Wednesday, June 5th – Monday, June 17th: Metuchen, North Edison, Colonia, Avenel, New Jersey; The invasion is in full effect! Home owners in North Edison and Colonia report having to haul away the dying bodies of cicadas in wheelbarrows! Residents describe the cicadas’ combined mating screams as “loud as a UFO” [how do they know what a UFO sounds like?] and “like a Mack Truck was floating ten foot above your head”! Someone even told me cicadas taste like shrimp! I guess they made the best of a bad situation.
  9. Wednesday, June 26th: Metuchen, New Jersey; It appears the invasion is over. All that remains is the dismembered, rotting corpses and the memories, sweet, sweet, memories. But remember, They’ll be back…in the year 2013!
  10. Saturday, August 3rd: Metuchen, New Jersey; Looking out my second story window I can clearly see the damage done by the 17-year cicadas. Brown patches of dead leaves speckle local oak and maple trees, revealing the branches where the female cicada has chosen to lay her eggs; an interesting “natural disaster”, but, not as heart-breaking as an earth quake or a flood. Clearly the most provocative news regarding cicadas is the current hatch of annual cicadas, which are larger than the “17-year” cicadas (thoroughly illustrated within this web page) and greener. Another dissimilarity is the difference in their respective mating calls: while the “17-year” cicada makes a whirring sound somewhere between the motor of a vacuum cleaner and a car alarm, the “annual” cicada sounds more like a lawn sprinkler or maybe a sewing machine. Although I can clearly hear hundreds of “annual” cicadas and I have found their shells, I haven’t visually located a single one ! Another cicada related event has been the recent hatch of “cicada killer” wasps. These two-inch long giant wasps only prey upon, our friend, the defenseless cicada. I haven’t located these creatures either, but, they are definitely out there. Cicadas beware!
  11. Wednesday, August 26th: Metuchen, New Jersey; the Tibicen cicadas continue to sing…
  12. Wednesday, November 6th: Metuchen, New Jersey; they are all dead or sucking on roots underground.

Cute names for the not so cute Cicada

  • Flying cigar butts
  • Flying turds
  • The harbingers of apocalypse
  • Impromptu doggie treats, hors d’oeuvres, missing Monopoly piece, etc…
  • Sky Fudge
  • Satan’s Parakeets
  • Living hair curlers
  • The name of an annoying acquaintance (example: “Blitzers”)
  • Tree roaches
  • Airbourne car alarms
  • Sleeping bag buddies

March 10, 2019

Cicada Cupcakes

Filed under: Cicada Mania — Dan @ 1:01 am

Cicada Cupcakes

Cicada Cupcakes

March 10th is my birthday and for my birthday my friend Lisa baked me cicada cupcakes with chocolate cicadas (made with cicada-shaped molds, not actual cicadas dipped in chocolate).

Yes, as of 2019, I am 50 which is 1 year short of 3 17-year Magicicada cycles.

February 17, 2019

French Cicada

Filed under: Cicada Mania | France | Lyristes | Tacuini (Cryptotympanini) | Tibicen — Dan @ 8:00 am

Cicada Mania has been around since 1996. It’s lived on at least five different domains (cicadamania.com is the current domain). Lots of history. Yesterday I was looking at old versions of the site on archive.org’s Wayback machine, which created archives of websites. I came across this post from 2001 and thought “these photos are not on the current site, let me upload them.

So here’s a copy of the original post, approximately 18 years later.

BTW, the cicada is Lyristes/Tibicen plebejus.

French Cicada

Cicada Experts, try to ID this French cicada!

Hello, In the south of France last week I saw a big insect. From the moment it climbed up a flower (picture 1) till the moment it became the one of picture 2 (10 hours later) I made 300 pictures with my Sony Mavica. Some questions; a) is this a cicada b) if so, whats the name c) do you know a site where I can find the sound of this species d) who could be interested in my pictures of the complete metamorphosis Greetings, H. Bakkenes Holland.

Tibicen/Lyristes plebejus

Tibicen/Lyristes plebejus

[Adding the old “back to top” cicada for fun.]

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