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April 20, 2024

A quick way to tell the difference between the 7 periodical cicadas species

Filed under: Brood XIII | Brood XIX | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 8:50 am

Here is a quick way to tell the difference between the 7 periodical cicada species:

Download this chart. Click/tap for a larger version:

The songs of Magicicada cassini (17-year) and Magicicada tredecassini (13-year) are essentially identical:

M. cassini:

M. tredecassini:

The songs of Magicicada septendecula (17-year) and Magicicada tredecula (13-year) are essentially identical:

M. septendecula (©Joe Green):

M. tredecula:

The songs of Magicicada septendecim (17-year), M. neotredecim (13-year), and Magicicada tredecim (13-year) are essentially identical. M. neotredecim varies the sound of its call in the presence of M. tredecim.

M. septendecim:

M. neotredecim (© Insect Singers)

M. tredecim (© Insect Singers)

And/or watch this video:

Then read this and listen to the sound files on the page: Where will 17 & 13 Year Periodical Cicada Broods emerge next?

February 1, 2024

New Brood XIX and XIII Cicada Book by Dr. Gene Kritsky

Filed under: Books | Brood XIII | Brood XIX | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 8:14 am

Cicada researcher and communicator Dr. Gene Kritsky has a new book about Brood XIX and XIII which are both emerging in the spring of 2024: A Tale of Two Broods: The 2024 Emergence of Periodical Cicada Broods XIII and XIX. It is available in paperback and Kindle formats.

A Tale of Two Broods: The 2024 Emergence of Periodical Cicada Broods XIII and XIX

Other posts about Dr. Gene Kritsky on this site:

  1. An Interview with Gene Kritsky
  2. Gene Kritsky’s new cicada site and Brood XIV news
  3. Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition by Gene Kritsky
  4. Gene’s App: Cicada Safari app for tracking Magicicada periodical cicadas

October 27, 2023

2024 Cicada Forecast

Filed under: Brood XIII | Brood XIX | Cicada Mania — Dan @ 9:17 pm

Updated on 5/30/2024.

2024 is the big year in the U.S.A. Two Magicicada Broods, Brood XIII (Thirteen) and Brood XIX (Nineteen, aka the Great Southern Brood) have emerged in the United States. People call these cicadas “locusts”, but they are cicadas.

Get ready for a zillion of these (if you’re in the right location):
Brood X header

Here’s a chart that shows where Brood XIX and Brood XIII are in their emergence cycle:

May 30th Update

about Brood XIX (WHICH HAS EMERGED and IS STARTING TO DIE OFF):

Brood XIX has a 13-year cycle, features four species, and is found in:

Alabama, north-west half of Arkansas, north-west Georgia, southeast Iowa, southern Illinois, south-west Indiana, western Kentucky, northern Louisiana, Maryland in St. Mary’s County, Missouri, Mississippi, central North Carolina, eastern Oklahoma, western South Carolina, Tennessee, eastern Virginia.

Big cities in the range of Brood XIX include Nashville (TN), Charlotte (NC), and St. Louis (MO), keeping in mind that they prefer the suburbs.

Read lots more about Brood XIX.

about Brood XIII (WHICH HAS EMERGED):

Brood XIII has a 17-year cycle, features three species, and is found in:

Eastern Iowa, northern Illinois, Indiana, near Lake Michigan, and southern Wisconsin. Though likely extinct, the brood once appeared in Michigan along the border with Indiana.

The largest city in Brood XIII is Chicago, Illinois, and the Lake County Forest Preserve in the suburbs of Chicago is a good place to visit for tourists. The Michigan part of the brood is likely extinct, so do not look there if you are a tourist.

Read lots more about Brood XIII.

Will the broods overlap?

They do not overlap! But, they come close in some areas.

Both Brood XIX and XIII exist in Macon, Sangamon, Livingston, and Logan counties in Illinois. The easily accessible place they come closest to overlapping is Springfield, Illinois, which is in Sangamon County. Compare this Brood XIII map with this Brood XIX.

People wonder what would happen if members of the broods mate. Their offspring would likely live and adopt either a 13 or 17-year life cycle. This will likely not happen because they don’t overlap, however, one experiment would be to get similar species from XIX and XIII and put them in an enclosure to see if they will mate.

Resources to get you through 2024

  1. A Tale of Two Broods: The 2024 Emergence of Periodical Cicada Broods XIII and XIX book by Dr. Gene Kritsky.
  2. The Cicada Safari app for iOS and Android to find and report cicadas.
  3. The University of Connecticut Periodical Cicadas website.
  4. An iNaturalist project was set up to track them.

Stragglers from other broods:

Magicicada stragglers from other broods will emerge in small numbers.

So far Brood XXIII and Brood XIV stragglers have been reported!

Annually emerging cicada species of North America:

Follow the progress of annual cicadas on our iNaturalist project.

In the United States, annual cicada emergences will happen like they did in 2023, with few surprises. Cicadas in southern locations will emerge first, with Quesada gigas emerging early on. Look at the chart on the cicada sounds page for a calendar of annual cicada emergences.

The cicadas that have a camouflage appearance are Neotibicen, like Neotibicen linnei aka Linne’s Cicada, or Megatibicen, Megatibicen resh aka Resh Cicada, and they are annual cicadas.

July 23 (small) 3
A Neotibicen tibicen is perhaps the most common annual cicada in North America.

Proto-periodical cicadas of North America (the fly fisher’s friend):

Emergences of proto-periodical cicadas depend on multiple factors including the species, crowding, location, and cumulative rainfall, making it hard to predict when they will emerge. We can’t say exactly when they’ll emerge in your location. Platypedia species, in particular, represent a “boon” to fly fishers, as they send fish into a feeding frenzy. The best bet for Platypedia cicadas is to tune into iNaturalist from April to June.

Platypedia
A Platypedia cicada, photo by CGWiber.

International species — World Wide Cicadas

A variety of cicadas

Generally speaking, cicadas in the Northern Hemisphere emerge somewhere between March and September, and in the Southern Hemisphere, somewhere between September and March. In places closer to the equator, like Ecuador, you can have cicadas for almost the entire year. You can use sites like iNaturalist and Cicada Mania to do research. iNaturalist compiles cicada identifications, including photos, sounds, and geographic data. Cicada Mania contains basic facts and historical and cultural knowledge.

There are periodical species of cicadas in Fiji and India. UPDATE! The “Leap-Year” brood of the Indian periodical cicada Chremistica ribhoi is currently emerging in the Kamrup District of Assam, India (4/25/2024).

iNaturalist by continent

on Cicada Mania by continent

You can also explore specific countries like…

iNaturalist by country:

on Cicada Mania by country:

More to come. Here is the 2023 Forecast.

May 27, 2023

2023 Magicicada straggler update

Filed under: Brood X | Brood XIII | Brood XIV | Brood XIX | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 6:49 am

Updated for June 7th!

Here’s a map of 2023 Magicicada straggler sightings from 2023 Magicicada stragglers iNaturalist project and the Cicada Safari app. Dr. Gene Kritsky compiled the map.

Kritsky map June 7

It looks like there are plenty of stragglers from these broods:

Learn about Magicicada stragglers.

April 13, 2023

Brood XIII and Brood XIX Magicicada will both emerge in 2024

Filed under: Brood XIII | Brood XIX | Periodical — Dan @ 9:42 am

News! A Brood XIX straggler has emerged in Georgia! More stragglers have been sighted in Hartselle AL, Pittsboro, NC, Chattanooga, TN, Asheboro, NC, and Chapel Hill, NC.

2024 will be a “magical” year for cicada fans because the periodical cicada broods XIII and XIX will emerge in 2024. These broods co-emerge every 221 years (13 X 17). The last time they co-emerged was in 1803, the same year as the Louisiana Purchase (the same year the U.S. got Brood XIX states Louisiana, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma). Coincidence? Perhaps.

Thomas Jefferson thinking of the cicadas he just bought.

Brood XIII (13) has a 17-year lifecycle and is found in the states of IA, IL, IN, MI, and WI. This brood features the species Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini, and Magicicada septendecula.

People (cicada tourists) have begun to ask “Where is the best place to see Brood XIII in 2024?”. I can recommend the Ryerson Conservation Area in Deerfield, IL. See photos and videos from my trip there in 2007. Illinois has both Brood XIII and Brood XIX, and all 7 Magicicada species. So you could spend a week in southern Illinois for Brood XIX and then travel north to Deerfield for Brood XIII.

Brood XIX (19) has a 13-year lifecycle and is found in the states of AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, and VA. This brood is also known as the Great Southern Brood and features the species Magicicada tredecim, Magicicada neotredecim, Magicicada tredecassini, and Magicicada tredecula.

Do these broods overlap? If they do, it’s in the Springfield, Illinois area. Springfield is a good place for your cicada sightseeing “basecamp”. Take a look at these maps on the UCONN Cicadas website: Brood XIX and Brood XIII.

Your next chance to see and hear two broods co-emerge will be in 2037 when Brood XIX and Brood IX (9) emerge.

March 19, 2020

White-eyed cicada found by Chris Lowry in Nashville, TN

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Magicicada — Dan @ 6:43 pm

White-eyed cicada found by Chris Lowry in Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed cicada found by Chris Lowry in Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed cicada found by Chris Lowry in Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed cicada found by Nathan Voss of Spring Hill, TN

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Megatibicen — Dan @ 6:41 pm

White-eyed cicada found by Nathan Voss of Spring Hill, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed cicada found by Nathan Voss of Spring Hill, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed cicada from Paul Stuve found in Columbia, MO

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Magicicada — Dan @ 6:40 pm

White-eyed cicada from Paul Stuve found in Columbia, MO. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed cicada from Paul Stuve found in Columbia, MO. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed Magicicada found by Jack Willey of Nashville, TN

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Megatibicen — Dan @ 6:37 pm

White-eyed Magicicada found by Jack Willey of Nashville, TV. 2011. Brood XIX.

White-eyed Magicicada found by Jack Willey of Nashville TV

White-eyed Magicicada found by Jack Willey of Nashville TV

White-Eyed Magicicada found by Phyllis Rice of Poplar Bluff, MO

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Magicicada — Dan @ 6:34 pm

White-Eyed Magicicada found by Phyllis Rice of Poplar Bluff, MO. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-Eyed Magicicada found by Phyllis Rice of Poplar Bluff, MO. Brood XIX. 2011.

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