Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

Locations where cicadas can be found, including countries and continents.

January 24, 2021

Cicadas @ UCONN, a new Cicada website

Filed under: John Cooley | Magicicada | Periodical | United States — Dan @ 9:12 pm

Magicicada.org was an amazing website filled with information about Magicicada periodical cicadas and backed by cicada expert, John Cooley.

The site now has a new address and look: Cicadas @ UCONN (https://cicadas.uconn.edu/). Bookmark it in preparation for the 2021 Brood X emergence.

Cicadas @ UCONN

UCONN (University of Connecticut) has other cicada websites such as The Simon Lab and Cicada Central.

January 16, 2021

Three new species of cicadas from Meghalaya, India

Filed under: Dundubiini | India | Mata | Vivek Sarkar — Dan @ 9:45 pm

Three new species of cicadas have been discovered in Meghalaya, India:
Mata meghalayana, Mata lenonia, and Mata ruffordii.

Mata cicadas  Vivek Sarkar
Photo courtesy of Vivek Sarkar.

Access the paper on Research Gate or Zootaxa Vol 4908, No 1.

Paper title: Description of three new species of the genus Mata Distant, 1906 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Oncotympanini) with notes on their natural history from Indian state of Meghalaya, India

Authors: Vivek Sarkar, Cuckoo Mahapatra, Pratyush P. Mohapatra, Manoj V. Nair, Krushnamegh Kunte

Abstract: “Three new species of the Asian genus Mata Distant, 1906 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) viz. Mata lenonia sp.nov.; Mata ruffordii sp.nov. and Mata meghalayana sp.nov. are described from Indian state of Meghalaya. Keys and taxonomic descriptions of these species are provided with detailed accounts of their natural history and acoustics.”

September 13, 2020

Australian Cicada Names 🇦🇺

Filed under: Australia | David Emery | L. W. Popple | Nathan Emery — Dan @ 1:01 am

This page features information about common cicadas of Australia, researchers, and websites dedicated to the cicadas of Australia. Australia has the best cicada names!

Cyclochila australasiae

Cyclochila australasiae can be found in eastern Queensland, NSW and Victoria, and most emerge between September & December1, but peaking in November2.

All Cyclochila australasiae info on this site.

Green Grocer morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae) photo by Bron
Photo by Bron.

Green Grocer morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Kevin Lee's Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by Kevin Lee. Yellow-Green Green Grocer with Mask.

Yellow Monday morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Yellow Monday (Cyclochila australasiae) photos by Tom Katzoulopolopoulous.
Photo by Tom Katzoulopolopoulous.

Blue Moon morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Cyclochila australasiae, Blue Moon, by David Emery
Photo by David Emery.

Masked Devil morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Masked Devil cicada (Cyclochila australasiae). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Cherrynose or Whiskey Drinker (Macrotristria angularis)

The Cherry Nose cicada can be found in Eastern Queensland, NSW, and a small part of South Australia, and is found November-February1, but is most common in December2.

Cherry Nose cicada (Macrotristria angularis). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Bagpipe Cicada (Lembeja paradoxa)

The Bagpipe cicada can be found in the Northern tip of Queensland1, from October to February, but they’re most common during January2.

Lembeja paradoxa (Karsch, 1890). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Floury Baker (Aleeta curvicosta)

The Floury Baker can be found along the coast of Queenland & NSW. Adults are most common in late December and January1.

Floury Baker by Michelle Thompson
Photo by Michelle Thompson.

Golden Emperor (Anapsaltoda pulchra)

When is it out: Nov-Jan.

Anapsaltoda pulchra - Golden Emperors. Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)

The Double Drummer can be found in parts of eastern Queensland and Eastern NSW, from November to early March1. Peaks in December.

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)
Photo by Dan.

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata)

When is it out: January.

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata) photos by Jodi from 2007. Australia.
Photo by Jodi.

White Drummer (Arunta perulata)

The White Drummer cicada can be found in eastern Queensland and NSW, from November to April, but they are most common during December and January1.

White Drummer cicada (Arunta perulata). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Bladder Cicada (Cystosoma saundersii)

The Bladder Cicada can be sound in eastern Queensland & NSW1, can be found September-January, peaking in October2.

Bladder cicadas (Cystosoma saundersii)
Photo by David Emery.

Redeye cicada (Psaltoda moerens)

The Redeye cicada can be found in eastern NSW, Victoria and Tasmania, and are most abundant in late November and December1, but can be found until February2.

Redeye cicada (Aleeta curvicosta). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

More interesting names:

  • Brown Bunyip (Tamasa tristigma) [Brown Bunyip]
  • Typewriter (Pauropsalta extrema) [picture]
  • Sandgrinder (Arenopsaltria fullo) [picture]

Black Prince/Silver Knight (Psaltoda plaga)

Tiger Prince (Macrotristria godingi)

Tettigarcta White, 1845

Tettigarctidae sp.
Tettigarcta tomentosa.

Diemeniana Distant, 1906

The Diemeniana euronotiana can be found in eastern NSW, south-eastern Victoria and Tasmania. They are most common in late November to January1.


Diemeniana euronotiana. Photo by David Emery.

Date and location:
1 Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990.
2 iNaturalist.com.

Researchers & resources:

David Emery

David Emery is a cicada researcher and has contributed many of the images you see on this website.

Use this amazing image by David Emery to identify some of the most well-known Australian cicada species:

Aussie cicadas 1 (3)

Nathan Emery

Nathan Emery released a cicada book called “A photo guide to the common cicadas of the Greater Sydney Region”. You can buy it online.
A photo guide to the common cicadas of the Greater Sydney Region

Dr. Popple

M.S. Moulds

Websites

  • Common names of Australian insects.
  • Atlas of Living Australia Cicada page.
  • Brisbane Cicadas.
  • Narelle Power’s Cicada Photos.
  • Scribbly Gum’s The Summer of Signing Cicadas.
  • Morwell National Park Online.
  • Laura Imbruglia sings songs that mention Green Grocers and Yellow Mondays on her album “It Makes a Crunchy Noise”.
  • (more…)

    August 23, 2020

    Four new species of cicadas in the Yoyetta abdominalis (Distant) species group

    Filed under: Australia | David Emery | L. W. Popple | Yoyetta — Dan @ 12:44 pm

    Four new cicadas described in Australia! Here are the details:

    Paper: Four new species of cicadas in the Yoyetta abdominalis (Distant) species group (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae) from southeastern Australia
    Abstract:

    Four new species are added to the Yoyetta abdominalis (Distant) species group: Y. douglasi sp. nov., Y. enigmatica sp. nov., Y. loftyensis sp. nov. and Y. ngarabal sp. nov. Calling song descriptions and morphological descriptions are provided for each species. An updated key to male specimens is also provided for the species group.

    Author: Lindsay W. Popple; David L. Emery
    Year: 2020
    Journal: Records of the Australian Museum
    Publisher: The Australian Museum
    Link: https://journals.australian.museum/popple-2020-rec-aust-mus-724-123147/
    More info on Dr. Popple’s website: Restless Firetail, Mt Lofty Firetail, Glade Firetail, and Grampians Firetail.

    July 12, 2020

    Tibicina haematodes (Scopoli 1763) stamp from France

    Filed under: France | Pop Culture | Tibicina — Tags: — Dan @ 3:29 pm

    Here’s a Tibicina haematodes (Scopoli 1763) stamp from France:

    Tibicina haematodes (Scopoli 1763) stamp from France

    Tibicina haematodes (Scopoli 1763) stamp from France

    Bladder cicada trading card

    Filed under: Australia | Cystopsaltria | Pop Culture — Dan @ 3:25 pm

    Bladder cicada trading card. Bladder cicadas (Genus Cystopsaltria) are found in Australia. Link to Dr. Popple’s website for more info.

    Bladder cicada trading card. Bladder cicadas are found in Australia.

    Chicago Area Periodical Cicada Emergences in 2020

    Filed under: Accelerations | Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical Stragglers | United States — Dan @ 10:04 am

    Many periodical cicadas emerged four years early in the Chicago area in 2020. These cicadas belong to the Brood XIII (13) which is set to emerge in 2024, and last emerged in 2007. Periodical cicadas often emerge in years proceeding or following the year their brood is expected to emerge. This phenomenon is called straggling. Most of the time these “stragglers” emerge in small numbers and are quickly eaten by predators, and do not go on to sing, chorus (synchronized singing for the purpose of attracting females), mate, and lay eggs. Sometimes they emerge in numbers large enough to survive, chorus and reproduce — this seems to have happened in the Chicago area in 2020. It is thought this this is how new broods formed over the millennia — cicadas emerge 4 or 1 year early in significant numbers and form a new brood. When enough stragglers emerge to successfully reproduce it is called an acceleration.

    So, is a new brood forming around Chicago? Is this due to climate change or localized “heat islands”? Will the progeny of these stragglers emerge in 13, 17 or 21 years? Lots of questions — but we’ll need to wait quite some time to answer them.

    There is a precedence for Brood XIII cicadas straggling in the Chicago area:

    In 1969 massive numbers of periodical cicadas emerged in the Chicago suburbs 1 (Williams, K.S. & Simon, C. 1995).

    In 1986, another 4-year acceleration was observed in the Chicago area by Monte Lloyd 1.

    In 2003, many people left observations on our forums. Observations were made in Glenview, Flossmoor, Riverside, Downers Grove, Homewood, Westmont, Oak Park, and Hinsdale. Here are some examples:

    Magicicada emerging this evening

    Date: Wednesday, Jun/4/2003

    Message: As I went for a walk this evening I noticed quite a few periodic cicadas emerging in the grass, crawling on the sidewalks and on the trunks of trees. This is not our year for the 17-year brood. We should not have them until 2007. Has anyone else in the Chicago area seen these cicadas? — Sue, Flossmoor, IL

    Cicada singing

    Date: Monday, Jun/9/2003

    Message: I heard the cicadas singing for the first time this morning after my walk. Now that I have my doors open I can hear them on and off. — Sue, Flossmoor, IL

    In 2020 many people left comments on the Brood XIII page, emailed us (thanks Neil) and left sightings via the Cicada Safari app.

    1Williams, K.S. & Simon, C. 1995. The Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution of Periodical Cicadas. Annual Review of Entomology. Vol. 40:269-295 (https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.en.40.010195.001413).

    May 27, 2020

    Where will 17 & 13 Year Periodical Cicada Broods emerge next?

    Skip to a section: Broods | Your Town | Pre Emergence Signs | Magicicada Species.

    17 & 13 Year Periodical Cicadas

    🛑 This page is strictly for Magicicada periodical cicadas, aka 17 & 13-year cicadas, aka "locusts" (read why they’re called locusts).This does not cover annual cicada species in North America and other parts of the world.

    News

    📅 Brood X will emerge in the spring of 2021. Some precursors (stragglers) from Brood XIV should emerge as well.

    Researchers need your help! If you see a cicada, please report it using the Cicada Safari App 📱, available for Android and Apple phones. See a Live Map of sightings.

    Magicicada Brood Chart

    The Brood Chart features the names of the broods (Roman numerals), their life cycle length, when they will emerge next, which states they’ll emerge in, links to Maps, the species that will emerge, and other information. Click the maps for larger, detailed maps.

    Brood 17 or 13 Year Stragglers Probable States & Species
    I (1) 17 1961, 1978, 1995, 2012, 2029 2025 (-4), 2028 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
    States: TN, VA, WV
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_01/
    II (2) 17 1962, 1979, 1996, 2013, 2030 2026 (-4), 2029 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
    States: CT, GA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OK, PA, VA
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_02/
    III (3) 17 1963, 1980, 1997, 2014, 2031 2027 (-4), 2030 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
    States: IA, IL, MO
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_03/
    IV (4) 17 1964, 1981, 1998, 2015, 2032 2028 (-4), 2031 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
    States: IA, KS, MO, NE, OK, TX
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_04/
    V (5) 17 1965, 1982, 1999, 2016, 2033 2029 (-4), 2032 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
    States: LI NY, MD, OH, PA, VA, WV
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_05/
    VI (6) 17 1966, 1983, 2000, 2017, 2034 2030 (-4), 2933 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. septendecula.
    States: GA, NC, SC, WI, OH
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_06/
    VII (7) 17 1967, 1984, 2001, 2018, 2035 2031 (-4), 2034 (-1) Species: M. septendecim.
    States: NY
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_07/
    VIII (8) 17 1968, 1985, 2002, 2019, 2036 2032 (-4), 2035 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
    States: OH, PA, WV and OK
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_08/
    IX (9) 17 1952, 1969, 1986, 2003, 2020 2033 (-4), 2036 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
    States: NC, VA, WV
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_09/
    X (10) 17 1953, 1970, 1987, 2004, 2021 2020 (-1), 2034 (-4), 2037 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
    States: DE, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MI, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WV, Washington
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_10/
    XIII (13) 17 1956, 1973, 1990, 2007, 2024 2020 (-4), 2023 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini.
    States: IA, IL, IN, MI, WI
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_13/
    XIV (14) 17 1957, 1974, 1991, 2008, 2025 2021 (-4), 2024 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
    States: GA, IN, KY, MA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WV
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_14/
    XIX (19) 13 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024 2020 (-4), 2023 (-1) Species: M. tredecim, M. neotredecim, M. tredecassini, M. tredecula.
    States: AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, VA
    Brood XIX mini map
    XXII (22) 13 1975, 1988, 2001, 2014, 2027 2023 (-4), 2026 (-1) Species: M. tredecim, M. tredecassini, M. tredecula.
    States: KY, LA, MS, OH
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_22/
    XXIII (23) 13 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028 2024 (-4), 2027 (-1) Species: M. tredecim, M. neotredecim, M. tredecassini, M. tredecula.
    States: AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, TN
    https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_23/

    When will they emerge?

    📅 🌡️ Generally speaking, these cicadas will begin to emerge when the soil 8″ beneath the ground reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit (Heath, 1968). A nice, warm rain will often trigger an emergence. They typically emerge in May but have been known to emerge in late April or early June. It all depends on the weather.

    What should you look for before they emerge?

    Chimneys / Turrets

    Look for cicada chimneys a.k.a. turrets. These are structures cicadas build out of the soil, positioned above the hole where they will emerge.

    Chimney

    Holes

    Look for holes the diameter of an adult’s finger near the root system of a tree. These are sure signs that cicadas will emerge in the area.

    Holes

    Cicadas Under Stones & Slates

    You might discover some cicada nymphs while turning over stones or when performing landscaping chores.

    Cicada tunneling under slate

    What do they look like when they emerge:

    Here is a great video of Magicicada nymphs once they have emerged from the ground:


    Nymph

    This is a recently emerged nymph crawling up a tree. Note that its eyes are red.

    Nymph

    Once cicadas nymphs have emerged from the ground, they will try to find a tree (or similar vertical surface), and then begin the process of shedding their old nymph skins (ecdysis), expanding their wings, and changing to their adult coloring. Watch this amazing transformation.

    Teneral

    How to tell the difference between the seven Magicicada species:

    The first way is based on the Brood. Take a look at the Brood chart above, and see which species appear with the Brood.

    There are 3 basic types of Magicicada: “‘Decims”, “‘Cassini” and “‘Deculas”.

    “Decims” aka Pharaoh Cicadas

    There are three species in this category:

    1. Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758). 17-year life cycle. Broods: I-X, XIII, XIV.
    2. Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley 2000. 13-year life cycle. Broods: XIX, XXIII.
    3. Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868). 13-year life cycle. Brood: XIX, XXII, XXIII.

    Their songs are very similar, however, when M. neotredecim & M. tredecim emerge in the same location, M. neotredecim’s song takes a higher pitch. Sounds like “Pharaoh, Pharaoh!”.

    Visual Appearance:

    M. septendecim
    Male on left; Female on right.

    M. neotredecim & M. septendecim have broad orange stripes with more orange than black on their abdomens.

    M. tredecim
    M. tredecim, by comparison, have almost entirely orange abdomens.

    eye to wing
    M. septendecim also have an area of orange coloring between the eye and the wing (pronotal extension).

    “Cassini” aka Dwarf Cicadas

    There are two species in this category:

    1. Magicicada cassini (Fisher, 1851). 17-year life cycle. Broods: I-V, VIII-X, XIII, XIV.
    2. Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962. 13-year life cycle. Broods: XIX, XXII, XXII.

    Their songs are essentially identical:

    M. cassini Call and Court:

    Note how it makes a quick burst of sound, followed by some rapid clicks.

    Visual Appearance:

    M. cassini
    Female on left; Male on right.
    M. tredecassin & M. cassini have black abdomens with virtually no orange at all. Orange stripes are possible in the mid-west (important to note for Brood IV).

    “Decula”

    There are two species in this category:

    1. Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962. 17-year life cycle. Broods: I-VI, VIII-X, XIII, XIV.
    2. Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962. 13-year life cycle. Broods: XIX, XXII, XXIII.

    Their songs are essentially identical:

    M. tredecula Call:

    Note the “tick, tick, tick” rhythm of the call.

    Visual Appearance:

    M. septendecula
    Female on left; Male on right.
    M. septendecula & M. tredecula have stripes that feature more black than orange. Otherwise, they’re very similar to M. cassini.

    How to figure out if they’re coming to your town?

    1. Verify that they’re coming to your state. Check the Magicicada Brood Chart on this page.
    2. Check Cicada Brood Maps linked from this page to see if they’re coming to your general area.
    3. Check to see if they’re coming to your neighborhood. Good sources include:
      1. Check the Cicada Central Magicicada Database to see the counties where cicadas have appeared in the past.
      2. Ask someone who lived there 17 (or 13) years before.
      3. Old timers (hint: old timers usually call them locusts).
      4. Check your local Library for old newspaper articles.
      5. Check with a local college: contact the entomology, forestry, or agriculture-related departments.
      6. Your local national, state, county and town parks department (parks and rec). Some county parks departments plan events around cicada emergences.
    4. When will they emerge?
      1. They will emerge sometime in the Spring, for sure.
      2. They typically emerge once the soil 8 inches (20 cm) below the surface gets to 64 degrees Fahrenheit (18 degrees Celcius). At that temperature, they will start digging their tunnels to the surface. After a couple of days with above-ground temperatures near the 80’s F, and after a good rain, they will definitely emerge. Read this paper for more info: Thermal Synchronization of Emergence in Periodical “17-year” Cicadas (Homoptera, Cicadidae, Magicicada) by James Edward Heath, American Midland Naturalist, Vol. 80, No. 2. (Oct., 1968), pp. 440-448.
      3. Cicadas in sunny areas of your yard will emerge before cicadas in shady areas.
      4. Cicadas in the southern-most states will emerge before cicadas in northern states.
      5. You can try the Cicada Emergence Formula as well.
    5. If you don’t want them do damage your young / ornamental trees
      1. Spray them off with a garden hose.
      2. Foil around the trunk (to keep them from crawling up) (thanks Deborah).
      3. Insect barrier tape.
      4. Netting placed around & over the tree. “Insect barrier netting”. “Fruit tree covers”.
      5. Bagpipes (no joke, it worked at my friend’s wedding).
      6. Don’t use pesticide – we like all insects (especially pollinating bees).
    6. Are you scared of insects?
      • Unlike some other insects & arthropods. cicadas are not poisonous or venomous.
      • Try a hat, an umbrella, a bee-keepers’ outfit, a suit of armor…
    7. They’re coming, and they’re going to ruin my wedding!

    Questions about the Brood Chart

    Question: Why do I have cicadas in my neighborhood, but your chart indicates that I shouldn’t?

    Answer: Some possibilities: 1) they are stragglers, periodical cicadas that emerge too soon or late, 2) they are not periodical cicadas, but are a different North American species, 3) you live on a continent other than North America, in which case, try one of these pages, or 4) SURPRISE! The U.S. is a big place and some cicada populations have yet to be documented.


    Question: Why don’t I have periodical cicadas in my area, but the information on your website indicates that I should?

    Answer: Two possibilities: 1) they went extinct or otherwise died off in your area, or 2) they aren’t everywhere in a state – normally there are large gaps in their range.


    Question: What are stragglers?

    Answer: Stragglers can emerge 1 or 4 years early or 1 or 4 years late. Don’t be surprised if you see some periodical cicadas emerge earlier than planned this year. 17-year brood members are most likely to straggle 4 years early, and 13-year brood members are most likely to straggle 4 years late. Straggler probability chart.


    Question: Why are there no Brood XI, XII, XV, XVI… ?

    Answer: Perhaps you’ve noticed there are no Broods XI (11), XII (12), XV (15), XVI (16), XVII (17), XVIII (18), XX (20), XXI (21), XXIV (24), etc. Don’t worry about that. They never existed or are extinct (XI, XXI).


    More Magicicada websites:

    1. For much more information about 17-year cicadas visit Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org). The maps on this page link to that site.
    2. The Cicada Safari App is available for Android and Apple devices 📱. Use it to see where people are finding cicadas, and to report your own sightings.
    3. Check the Cicada Central Magicicada Database to see the counties where cicadas have appeared in the past. For more information about this database and cicada research in general, visit the Simon Lab website.

    More Magicicada Information

    May 16, 2020

    A cicada from Ecuador, probably Pachypsaltria sp. Photo by Rebecca van den Bogert

    Filed under: Cicadatrini | Ecuador | Pachypsaltria — Dan @ 8:53 am

    Rebecca van den Bogert shared this photo of a cicada from Ecuador.

    Details: “Plaza de Ponchos” Marktet in Otovalo / April 19th 2007 / 2 p.m. / about 65 °F.

    I’m reasonably certain it belongs to the genus Pachypsaltria, and might be Pachypsaltria cinctomaculata. I’m not 100% of that.

    Rebecca van den Bogert - Ecuador
    Photo by Rebecca van den Bogert. Original was cropped.

    May 12, 2020

    Can you identify this cicada from Romania?

    Filed under: Europe (Continent) | Identify | Romania — Dan @ 7:40 pm

    Can you identify this cicada from Bucharest, Romania?

    These photos were taken by Tudor Sava. I’ve cropped them so you can get a closer view.

    Since the cicada is in the process of molting/has just molted, it doesn’t have its final adult colors yet. There’s a good chance some of the brown, green and red/orange colors will be

    Bucharest, Romania by Tudor Sava

    Bucharest, Romania by Tudor Sava

    Bucharest, Romania by Tudor Sava

    More »