Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

March 17, 2019

Lyristes plebejus or Tibicen plebejus?

Lyristes plebejus is a cicada found in most of Europe and middle-eastern Asia. There is an ongoing debate over its genus. Some say Lyristes, and some say Tibicen. I don’t have an opinion on the matter, but most folks in Europe say Lyristes plebejus, so I’m leading with that name.

Photo of an adult Lyristes plebejus by Iván Jesus Torresano García:
Lyristes plebejus

Photo of a molting Lyristes plebejus by Iván Jesus Torresano García:
Molting

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Lyristes or Tibicen
Species: Lyristes plebejus (Scopoli 1763) or Tibicen plebejus (Scopoli 1763)

For more photos of this cicada, visit this gallery of photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García.

For more information about this cicada, visit SONGS OF EUROPEAN SINGING CICADAS.

March 12, 2019

Macrotristria angularis (Germar, 1834)

Filed under: Australia,Cryptotympanini,David Emery,Macrotristria — Dan @ 1:01 am

Macrotristria angularis is a cicada found in Australia. It is also known as the Cherry Nose Cicada.

Photo by David Emery:
Cherry Nose cicada (Macrotristria angularis)

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Macrotristria
Species: Macrotristria angularis (Germar, 1834)

For more information about this cicada, visit A web guide to the cicadas of Australia by L. W. Popple.

March 7, 2019

Auritibicen flammatus

Filed under: Auritibicen,Cryptotympanini,Japan,Osamu Hikino — Dan @ 1:01 am

There are five sub-species of Auritibicen flammatus. They are found in Japan and known as Aka-ezo-zemi.

Auritibicen flammatus adonis photo by Osamu Hikino.
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Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Auritibicen (formerly Lyristes and Tibicen)
SubSpecies:

  • Auritibicen flammatus adonis Kato, 1933
  • Auritibicen flammatus concolor Kato, 1934
  • Auritibicen flammatus flammatus (Distant, 1892)
  • Auritibicen flammatus nakamurai Kato, 1940
  • Auritibicen flammatus viridiflavus Kato, 1939

For more information about Auritibicen flammatus, visit Cicadae in Japan.

Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

March 6, 2019

Psaltoda moerens (Germar, 1834)

Filed under: Australia,Cryptotympanini,David Emery,Psaltoda — Dan @ 1:01 am

Psaltoda moerens is a cicada found in Australia. It is also known as the Redeye Cicada or Cherryeye Cicada.

Photo by David Emery:
Psaltoda moerens (Germar, 1834)

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Psaltoda
Species: Psaltoda moerens (Germar, 1834)

For more information about this cicada, visit A web guide to the cicadas of Australia by L. W. Popple.

March 5, 2019

Salvazana mirabilis imperialis Distant, 1918

Salvazana mirabilis imperialis is a cicada found in Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam.

Photo by Michel Chantraine:
Salvazana mirabilis imperialis Distant, 1918

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Salvazana
Species: Salvazana mirabilis imperialis Distant, 1918

March 4, 2019

Salvazana mirabilis mirabilis Distant, 1913

Salvazana mirabilis mirabilis is a cicada found in Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Photo by Michel Chantraine:
Salvazana mirabilis mirabilis

Photo by Dan Mozgai:
Salvazana mirabilis mirabilis Distant, 1913

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Salvazana
Species: Salvazana mirabilis mirabilis Distant, 1913

February 28, 2019

Can you identify this cicada from Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia? (Cryptotympana aquila)

Filed under: Cryptotympana,Cryptotympanini,Identify,Malaysia — Dan @ 1:01 am

cicada

Can you identify this cicada from Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia? The photo was taken by photographer Karim Madoya.

Update: here’s what it is: Cryptotympana aquila.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Cryptotympana
Species: Cryptotympana aquila (Walker, 1850)

More info about this cicada.

Psaltoda claripennis Ashton, 1921 aka Clanger

Filed under: Australia,Cryptotympanini,Psaltoda — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Can you identify this cicada from Brisbane Australia? These images were sent to us by Darren Fairbrother. Help us id this cicada.

Update! It is a Psaltoda claripennis Ashton, 1921 aka Clanger, from Australia.

mystery cicada

mystery cicada

For more information about this cicada, visit A web guide toThe cicadas of Australia by L. W. Popple.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genera: Genera
Species: Psaltoda claripennis Ashton, 1921

February 19, 2019

Cryptotympana mandarina Distant, 1891

Cryptotympana mandarina is a cicada found in China, Laos, Vietnam, India, Thailand, and likely adjacent nations.

Photo by Michel Chantraine:
 Cryptotympana mandarina

This description comes from A Monograph of Oriental Cicadas by W. L. Distant. 1889-1892. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website:

Male: Body above black; eyes fuscous; the anal segment of the abdomen with an ochraceous spot on each side. Body beneath and legs black; a spot at the anterior margin of the face, two marginal spots between face and eyes, lateral margins of face, femoral streaks, posterior tibiae (excluding bases and apices), margins of opercula, segmental margins (excluding disk), and apex of terminal segment, dark ochraceous.

Tegmina and wings hyaline, the venation fuscous; tegmina with the costal membrane castaneous, its extreme costal edge blackish, the post-costal area blackish; basal cell black; about the basal third of tegmina and the subcostal area to ax^es pale castaneous. Wings with about basal half irregularly very dark castaneous.

The opercula extend to about half the length of the abdomen, slightly overlap at the basal margin, somewhat concavely and obliquely sinuate at outer margins, and inwardly beyond base widely divergent to apices, which are narrowly and obtusely convex.

Long. excl. tegm. Male. 40 millim. Exp. tegm. 115 millim.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Cryptotympana
Species: Cryptotympana mandarina Distant, 1891

February 18, 2019

The Curious Case of Cultriformis in California

Megatibicen cultriformis (Davis, 1915), aka the Grand Western Flood Plain Cicada, is large cicada found in the states Arizona and New Mexico in the U.S. and in Mexico. According to the Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico by Allen F. Sanborn and Polly K. Phillips, it is found in the Mexican Highland Section of the Basin and Range Province of the Sonoran Desert, and is associated with cottonwood and willow trees1.

Over the weekend, cicada collector Richard Newfrock emailed me some cicada photos for identification. Amongst those photos was what appears to be Megatibicen cultriformis labeled Escondido, Cal[iforia]. I asked Richard about the location, and sure enough, he said they were found in a pool in Escondido. I double-checked the species and location with top-tier cicada experts Jeffery Cole and David Marshall. From our conversation, I believe they agreed that the cicadas appeared to be M. cultriformis and that Escondido is far from its normal range (about 400 miles away).

Female (left), Male (right). Found floating in a pool.
Megatibicen cultriformis

So, how did these cicadas Megatibicen cultriformis end up in Escondido? More than likely, if they are truly M. cultriformis, they hitchhiked on a tree transported from Arizona to California — or as David Marshall said to me in an email, “it’s at least possible that cultriformis could have been introduced on the roots of saplings transplanted from Arizona”.

Does anyone in the Escondido area want to listen for these cicadas in the summer and report back to us if you hear them?

Listen to its song:

Source: ©Insect Singers

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genera: Megatibicen
Species: Megatibicen cultriformis (Davis, 1915)

William T Davis’s description from A New Cicada from Arizona2:

Resembles Cicada marginata Say [now called Megatibicen pronotalis walkeri Metcalf, 1955] in size, color, and markings. Head black with an oblong greenish yellow spot each side between the eyes and a small spot of the same color on the front just above the transverse rugae. Pronotum greenish yellow with a large, conspicuous black spot occupying the fore part of its central area. The hind margin of the pronotum (collar) is entirely unicolorous as in marginata. The mesonotum is black, with a pruinose band each side at the base of the wings; the elevated x is greenish yellow, and there are two conspicuous, irregularly formed (pipe-shaped) greenish yellow spots occupying its central portion. The tergum is black, each side broadly margined with pruinose, and the segments have their posterior margins yellowish. There is also an indication of a dorsal line of pruinose spots on the tergum, which in the type have been nearly worn off. Beneath the head is blackish, the remainder of the insect being greenish yellow and more or less pruinose. The costal margin of the fore wing is entirely greenish yellow, darkened beyond the middle, and the w-mark is inconspicuous. Both fore and hind wings are greenish-yellow at base, with the veins darkened beyond the middle.

Note that greens often fade to tannish colors after a cicada dies.

Trivia: In Latin, “cultr” means knife, and “form” means shape — cultriformis means knife-shaped. Davis named cultriformis because “uncus locks, which are s millimeters long in cultriformis, and when seen in profile are shaped like the blade of a pruning knife, hence the name.” The uncus is the male genitalia.

Resources:

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