Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

September 30, 2022

Neotibicen lyricen nymph crawling up a tree

Filed under: Cryptotympanini | Neocicada | Nymphs | Video — Tags: — Dan @ 7:43 pm

Here’s a video of a Neotibicen lyricen nymph crawling up the trunk of a fir tree, looking for a place to molt. Note the dark eyes and green wing buds. This particular pine tree is my go-to for Lyric cicadas. Here’s another: Neotibicen lyricen molting.

Thumbnail:
ThumbNail Neotibicen lyricen

April 13, 2022

Cicada Nypmhs

Filed under: Nymphs — Dan @ 8:46 pm

Monday I was doing some landscaping and I found these Magicicada nymphs feeding on the roots of a boxwood shrub. They appear to be third-instar Brood II Magicicada nymphs. 9 years old!

3rd instar Magicicada nymph

3rd instar Magicicada nymph

March 27, 2022

Neotibicen lyricen molting in New Jersey July 2021

Filed under: Cryptotympanini | Molting | Neotibicen | Nymphs | Teneral | United States — Dan @ 5:39 am

Here are some Neotibicen lyricen molting in New Jersey July 2021.

Rich caramel eyes; blues & pinks in pronotal collar, legs, and mesonotum; green wings (that will stay green) and orange abdomen.

Neotibicen lyricen New Jersey July 2021

Neotibicen lyricen New Jersey July 2021

Neotibicen lyricen New Jersey July 2021 02

April 18, 2021

Periodical cicada nymphs emerging at night

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Molting | Nymphs | Periodical — Dan @ 5:29 am

One of the most fun periodical cicada experiences is watching thousands of nymphs emerge from the ground at night, and crawl to the nearest vertical surface (hopefully a tree) and begin to molt.

This is a video by Roy Troutman from 2007 of the Brood XIII emergence, specifically in Ryerson Woods in Illinois:

Observing magicicada emergence at Ryerson Woods from Roy Troutman on Vimeo.

Here’s a time-lapse video, also by Roy, of a cicada nymph molting:

Magicicada nymph molting from Roy Troutman on Vimeo.

March 25, 2020

Roy Troutman’s Cicada Photos from the 1980s

Filed under: Nymphs | Photos & Illustrations | Roy Troutman — Dan @ 6:06 pm

Roy Troutman has been a cicada fan since he was a kid. Here’s some of his cicada photos from the 1980s:

1980: Neotibicen nymph.
Tibicen Nymph. 1980. Roy Troutman.

1981. Tibicen exuvia (skins).
1981. Tibicen exuvia. Roy Troutman.

1982. Roy and a Neotibicen.
Roy and a Neotibicen. 1982.

1983. Immature Magicicadas.
1983 immature Magicicada nymphs. Roy Troutman.

1983. Immature Magicicada.
1983 Immature Magicicada. Roy Troutman.

March 7, 2020

Magicicada nymphs found by Elias, part 2

Filed under: Elias Bonaros | Magicicada | Nymphs | Periodical — Dan @ 6:02 am

Continuing from part 1, Elias Bonaros did some digging and took these photos of first and second instar Magicicada periodical cicadas on a warm winter day (March 21, 2010).

Now you know what cicadas look like when they’re underground!

Generally speaking the ones with the bulbous abdomens are second instar, and the smaller ones with the less bulbous or not bulbous abdomens are first instar.

Magicicada Nymphs found by Elias, part 1

Filed under: Elias Bonaros | Magicicada | Nymphs | Periodical — Dan @ 5:50 am

Have you every wondered what cicadas look like when they’re underground? Elias Bonaros did some digging and took these photos of first and second instar Magicicada periodical cicadas on a warm winter day (March 21, 2010). Magicicadas have 5 instars, or phases of development. Each phase has a slightly different appearance.

This is a probable second instar nymph of Magicicada septendecim (Periodical cicada) from the 2008 Brood XIV emergence. Dug up from beneath an oak tree. It was living approximately 4-6 inches from the ground surface. Temperature 70 degrees.

Elias cicada nymph

These are probable first and second instar nymphs of Magicicada septendecim (Periodical cicada) from the 2008 Brood XIV emergence. Dug up from beneath an oak tree. They were living approximately 4-6 inches from the ground surface. Temperature 70 deg.

Elias Magicicada nymphs

February 29, 2020

Cicada eggs and first instar nymph photos by Roy Troutman

Filed under: Eggs | Nymphs | Roy Troutman — Dan @ 3:11 pm

Cicada eggs and first instar nymph photos by Roy Troutman:

Cicada Eggs:
Cicada Eggs

First instar cicada nymphs:
First instar cicada nymphs

August 7, 2019

Check for first instar periodical cicada nymphs

Filed under: Eggs | Magicicada | Nymphs | Periodical — Dan @ 4:26 am

It’s been about six weeks since the emergence of Brood VIII in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Oklahoma. Now (first week of August) is a good a time as any to check for periodical cicada nymphs that have hatched from eggs laid in branches. Once they hatch they’ll find their way to the ground, where they’ll find and begin feeding on roots for the next 17 years.

Look on branches where cicada laid their eggs.

An illustraition of egg nests:
An illustraition of egg nests:

A nymph on a branch with adult male finger for comparison:
Periodical Cicada Nymph

Close up:
Periodical Cicada Nymph

Another close up:
Periodical Cicada Nymph

June 26, 2013

Help the Simon Cicada Lab study periodical cicada nymphs

Filed under: Community Science | Magicicada | Nymphs | Periodical — Dan @ 9:20 pm

The Simon Lab is dedicated to the study of cicadas, in particular, periodical cicadas.

One of the things they study is the development of cicada nymphs while they are underground.

They need your help to collect cicada nymph specimens. You would dig for them, and if you find them, mail them to the Simon Lab. The nymphs will be used for valuable scientific study, so the loss of a few from your yard will not be in vain.

If you are interested in participating in cicada nymph research, visit The Simon Lab Nymph Tracking Project page for more information. You must have had periodical cicadas on your property in past 13 or 17 years to find the nymphs — not including the Brood II area, since those nymphs came out of the ground this year.

Cicada Nymphs

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