Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

April 2, 2020

Cicadettana calliope calliope (Walker, 1850) aka Southern Grass Cicada

Filed under: Cicadettana,Cicadettini,United States — Tags: — Dan @ 8:14 pm

Cicadettana calliope calliope (Walker, 1850) aka Southern Grass Cicada.

Cicadettana calliope photo taken by Paul Krombholz
Pink Cicadettana calliope photo taken by Paul Krombholz.

Cicadettana calliope photo taken by Paul Krombholz
Yellow Cicadettana calliope photo taken by Paul Krombholz.

â­˘ All Cicadettana calliope calliope images and photos on cicadamania.com.

Song type: Call


Source: ©Insect Singers | Species: C. calliope calliope

Song type: Call


Source: ©Insect Singers | Species: C. calliope calliope

Name, Location and Description

A description by Wm.T. Davis1

The species has a wide distribution and shows considerable variation. The females are gen- erally a little larger than the males and with broader heads. There are both green and brown individuals.

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Cicadettini
Subtribe: Cicadettina
Genus: Cicadetta
Species: Cicadetta calliope calliope (Walker, 1850)

List of sources

  1. (1) Davis, W.T. 1918. MISSISSIPPI CICADAS, WITH A KEY TO THE SPECIES OF THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES. Journal of The New York Entomological Society. 26: 141-155. Read it on archive.org.
  2. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  3. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  4. Locations: Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico by Allen F. Sanborn and Polly K. Phillips.
  5. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

March 22, 2020

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García from Spain

Filed under: Cicadettini,Euryphara,Iván GarcĂ­a,Spain — Tags: — Dan @ 10:22 am

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García from Spain.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García from Spain

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García from Spain

March 18, 2020

Pauropsalta sp. photos by Kees Green

Filed under: Australia,Cicadettini,Kees Green,Pauropsalta — Dan @ 5:34 pm

Pauropsalta sp. photos by Kees Green. Australia. 2013.

Pauropsalta sp by Kees Green
Pauropsalta sp by Kees Green

Pauropsalta sp by Kees Green
Pauropsalta sp by Kees Green

March 16, 2020

Tettigettalna argentata photo by Iván Jesus Torresano García

Filed under: Cicadettini,Iván GarcĂ­a,Spain,Tettigettalna — Tags: — Dan @ 6:56 pm

Tettigettalna argentata photo by Iván Jesus Torresano García. 2014. Spain.

Tettigettalna argentata photo by Iván Jesus Torresano García

Cicada habitat in Spain:

Cicada habitat in Spain

Hilaphura varipes photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García

Filed under: Cicadettini,Hilaphura,Iván GarcĂ­a,Spain — Dan @ 6:17 pm

Hilaphura varipes photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Hilaphura varipes photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Hilaphura varipes photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Hilaphura varipes photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Hilaphura varipes photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García

Filed under: Cicadettini,Euryphara,Iván GarcĂ­a — Tags: — Dan @ 6:04 pm

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

Euryphara contentei photos by Iván Jesus Torresano García. Spain. 2014.

February 20, 2019

Diemeniana euronotiana (Kirkaldy, 1909)

Filed under: Australia,Cicadettini,David Emery,Diemeniana — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Diemeniana euronotiana is a cicada found in Australia. It is also known as a Golden Twanger.

Photo by David Emery:
Diemeniana euronotiana

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Cicadettini
SubTribe: Cicadettina
Genus: Diemeniana
Species: Diemeniana euronotiana (Kirkaldy, 1909)

For more information about this cicada, visit A web guide to the cicadas of Australia by L. W. Popple.

Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

February 10, 2019

Huechys sanguinea

Huechys sanguinea is a cicada found in Burma, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Thailand, and likely many other nations in Asia. There are at least 5 subspecies of this cicada. It is also known as the “medicinal cicada” because people use it as a medicine (see my translation below).

Photo by Michel Chantraine:
Huechys sanguinea

Description1:

Body and legs black; front and face to head, two large spots to mesonotum — sometimes fused and covering the whole disk — and the abdomen, sanguineous; base of abdomen narrowly black.

Tegmina black, opaque; wings shining fuscous, sometimes almost black, the interior of the anal area always paler.

Rostrum passing the intermediate coxae; face moderately compressed, and very coarsely striate.

Long. excl. tegm. Male and Female 17 to 25 millim. Exp. tegm. 43 to 65 millim.

Here’s my translation, from French, of a note about the medicinal properties of the cicada. The original text comes from A Monograph of Oriental Cicadas:

According to Dr. Fumouze, “Huechys sanguinea, the Cicada sangiunolenta d’OIivier, is a very strong [common] insect in certain provinces of China, where it is harvested for the needs [valuable medicinal properties] of the species. In China, this insect would pass into China to enjoy curative properties, and it would be used chiefly in the treatment of rabies, but its value as much as the medicine against rabies is doubtful, but its action on the genitourinary organs seems to be certain, and this is what is in the fore, if the Huechys sanguinea would not yield a particular or similar active ingredient to the cantharides, what I can say now, it is because, by the procedures used to extract Cantharidin from cantharides, I have obtained no results, perhaps I will be later after that, but my first researches have not been completely unsuccessful, because I arrived to extract from Huechys sanguinea the material which gives to the abdominous teguments of this insect their magnificent yellow-orange color. This matter, which I will call Huechys’ red, is of a color exactly like that of the abdomen of the animal, as you can see by means of a sample which I put before your eyes. Huechys sanguinea also contains, but in smaller quantities, another yellowish, hygrometric dying material. “- Btdl. Soc. Ent. Fr. 1888, pp. xxii., xxiii.

TL;DR = “People use it to treat rabies, but it’s doubtful it actually works as a rabies treatment. It does work for its ‘Viagra-like’ properties. And its red pigment can be extracted.”

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Cicadettini
SubTribe: Huechysina
Genus: Huechys
Species:

  • Huechys sanguinea hainanensis Kato, 1931
  • Huechys sanguinea philaemata (Fabricius, 1803)
  • Huechys sanguinea sanguinea (Degeer, 1773)
  • Huechys sanguinea suffusa Distant, 1888
  • Huechys sanguinea wuchangensis Liu, 1940

For more information about this cicada, visit Cicadas of India.

References:

  1. The description and location information comes from A Monograph of Oriental Cicadas by W. L. Distant. 1889-1892. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).
  3. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

September 17, 2017

New species of Clinopsalta cicadas

Lindsay Popple announced on Twitter that two new species of Clinopsalta cicadas have been described.

Links:

Sounds: Calling songs of Clinopsalta cicadas.

Journal Article: TWO NEW SPECIES OF CLINOPSALTA MOULDS (HEMIPTERA: CICADIDAE) AND ADDITIONAL DISTRIBUTION RECORDS FOR CLINOPSALTA ADELAIDA (ASHTON), WITH NOTES ON THEIR DISTINCTIVE CALLING SONGS. Popple and Emery, 2017. Rec. Aust. Mus. 69(4): 237–256

Abstract from the journal article:

Two new species are described in the genus Clinopsalta Moulds. Clinopsalta autumna sp. nov. exhibits a warm temperate distribution from south-east Queensland south to Goulburn and Nerriga in eastern New South Wales. Clinopsalta semilunata sp. nov. has a patchy distribution in southern Queensland from Binjour Plateau west to near Miles, south to Yelarbon State Forest and Durikai State Forest, both near Inglewood. In addition to the descriptions of these new species, further distribution records are provided for C. adelaida (Ashton), which extend its distribution from south-eastern South Australia and northern Victoria to inland central and northern New South Wales. The species of Clinopsalta are small–medium sized cicadas (< 20 mm body length) with distinctive calling songs of an intermediate frequency (c. 6 to 18 kHz). The temporal structures of the calling songs follow a similar pattern in each species, comprising an introductory rattle followed by a series of clicking phrases. The call is characteristically accompanied with bouts of prominent wing-snapping, except in one species (C. semilunata sp. nov.).

March 25, 2017

New Cicada: Berberigetta dimelodica

Thanks to Vera L. Nunes for letting us know about a newly described/discovered cicada named Berberigetta dimelodica.

Berberigetta is also a new genus, belonging to the Tribe Cicadettini.

See and listen to it in this YouTube video:

The paper than describes the species is:

Gonçalo João Costa, Vera L. Nunes, Eduardo Marabuto, Raquel Mendes, Telma G. Laurentino, José Alberto Quartau, Octávio S. Paulo, Paula Cristina Simões. 2017. Morphology, songs and genetics identify two new cicada species from Morocco: Tettigettalna afroamissa sp. nov. and Berberigetta dimelodica gen. nov. & sp. nov. (Hemiptera: Cicadettini). Zootaxa. Vol 4237, No 3.

Link to the Zootaxa page for the document.

And here’s a quote of the Abstract:

Morocco has been the subject of very few expeditions on the last century with the objective of studying small cicadas. In the summer of 2014 an expedition was carried out to Morocco to update our knowledge with acoustic recordings and genetic data of these poorly known species. We describe here two new small-sized cicadas that could not be directly assigned to any species of North African cicadas: Tettigettalna afroamissa sp. nov. and Berberigetta dimelodica gen. nov. & sp. nov. In respect to T. afroamissa it is the first species of the genus to be found outside Europe and we frame this taxon within the evolutionary history of the genus. Acoustic analysis of this species allows us to confidently separate T. afroamissa from its congeners. With B. dimelodica, a small species showing a remarkable calling song characterized by an abrupt frequency modulation, a new genus had to be erected. Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses with DNA-barcode sequences of Cytochrome C Oxidase 1 support the monophyly of both species, their distinctness and revealed genetic structure within B. dimelodica. Alongside the descriptions we also provide GPS coordinates of collection points, distributions and habitat preferences.

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