Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

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Cicadas have three types of life cycles: annual, periodical, proto-periodical.

April 19, 2021

17-year cicada cross word puzzle

Filed under: Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 6:02 pm

Want to try a 17-year cicada crossword puzzle? It isn’t easy.

Download a large version of the image with the hints. Or use the one on this page:

Cicada Cross Word Puzzle

ACROSS
2. Two of them are…
7. Mistaken identity
8. Soil temperature sampler
10. Insect Singers site
11. The cicada’s old outfit
13. Where you’ll find the arches.
15. Keep a lid on it.
17. Longest lifecycle.
22. Ohio expert
24. Five.
27. Never on time.
28. A delicious drink.
29. I’m seeing red.
30. Grill.
31. 5 steps.
33. Final form.
35. Seven is the smallest.

DOWN
1. Un-popped collar.
3. Four to get off the Floor.
4. A “cool” cicada expert.
5. Three of Five.
6. Youngsters.
9. Plates
12. A rare color.
14. Nest knife.
16. Pitch shifter
18. Left Connecticut forever
19. Drum kit.
20. Amphetamine fungus.
21. Cicada banners.
23. Keep hanging on.
25. Mr. Softy.
26. Just six of these.
32. Beak.
34. Connecticut lab leader

I used the Discovery Education Puzzlemaker to create this.

April 18, 2021

Cicada Mania BINGO for Brood X 2021

Filed under: Cicada Mania | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 5:48 am

Here’s something fun: Cicada Mania BINGO. Use this BINGO card to keep track of everything you see, hear or do in context to the Brood X emergence. Here’s a PDF version. Tips below the image of the card:

Cicada Mania

Tips:

  1. Pictures of cicada Holes and Chimneys
  2. Magicicada septendecim photos & song
  3. A cicada with white eyes
  4. Cicadas with blue and yellow eyes
  5. Video of Cicada Nymphs at Night
  6. Cicadas with Massospora cicadina fungus infections
  7. Magicicada septendecula photos & songs
  8. Cicada eggs and young nymphs
  9. Are cicadas safe to eat?
  10. Magicicada cassini photos & songs
  11. Video of a cicada laying eggs
  12. Links to the Cicada Safari app.
  13. Cicada songs, including Choruses
  14. Wing Flicks Videos

I’ll probably do a version for summertime cicadas too.

Periodical cicada nymphs emerging at night

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Molting | Nymphs | Periodical — Dan @ 5:29 am

One of the most fun periodical cicada experiences is watching thousands of nymphs emerge from the ground at night, and crawl to the nearest vertical surface (hopefully a tree) and begin to molt.

This is a video by Roy Troutman from 2007 of the Brood XIII emergence, specifically in Ryerson Woods in Illinois:

Observing magicicada emergence at Ryerson Woods from Roy Troutman on Vimeo.

Here’s a time-lapse video, also by Roy, of a cicada nymph molting:

Magicicada nymph molting from Roy Troutman on Vimeo.

March 21, 2021

Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition by Gene Kritsky

Filed under: Books | Gene Kritsky | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 11:00 am

Renowned cicada researcher Gene Kritsky, PhD., has a new book out: Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition. It is available for Kindle and paperback on Amazon.com. Now’s the time to get it.

Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition

Gene is also has a new link for the Cicada Safari App.

March 3, 2021

Seventeen Year Cicadas, a song by George Peter Block, Jr.

Filed under: Magicicada | Music | Periodical — Dan @ 1:53 pm

Here’s a song titled Seventeen Year Cicadas by George Peter Block, Jr,:

February 4, 2021

Aside from Brood X, what else is happening with cicadas in the U.S.

Filed under: Magicicada | Periodical | Periodical Stragglers — Dan @ 9:21 pm

Aside from Brood X, what else is happening in terms of Periodical cicadas?

  • Expect some early-emerging cicadas from Brood XIV, showing up 4 years early. Brood XIV exists in Georgia, Kentucky, Indiana, Massachusettes, Maryland, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia.
  • There might be some 1-year stragglers form Brood IX. Brood IX is in North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.
  • There might be some 4-year stragglers from Brood VI. Brood VI is found in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Oklaholma. And Ohio?Brood VI is a weird one.

January 24, 2021

70,000 Magicicada cicadas = one adult American?

Filed under: Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 11:12 pm

I was wondering how much an adult Magicicada weighs. According to Richard Karban’s paper “Transient habitats limit development time for periodical cicadas,” a female Magicicada septendecim weighs approximately 1.2 grams. (Karban, R. (2014), Transient habitats limit development time for periodical cicadas. Ecology, 95: 3-8. https://doi.org/10.1890/13-1518.1)

According to the CDC website, the average adult American human weighs 84051 grams.

That means the average adult weighs as much as 70,043 Magicicada cicadas.

Image unrelated:
Godzilla vs Cicada

Cicadas @ UCONN, a new Cicada website

Filed under: John Cooley | Magicicada | Periodical | United States — Dan @ 9:12 pm

Magicicada.org was an amazing website filled with information about Magicicada periodical cicadas and backed by cicada expert, John Cooley.

The site now has a new address and look: Cicadas @ UCONN (https://cicadas.uconn.edu/). Bookmark it in preparation for the 2021 Brood X emergence.

Cicadas @ UCONN

UCONN (University of Connecticut) has other cicada websites such as The Simon Lab and Cicada Central.

January 9, 2021

Periodical cicada Brood X (10) will emerge in 15 states in 2021

Filed under: Brood X | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 1:01 am

Brood X 2021

Periodical cicada Brood X (10) will emerge in the spring of 2021 in Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York (extinct or nearly so), Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington D.C.

The last time this brood emerged was in 2004.

If you see or hear them report them with the Cicada Safari app. Use the hashtag #BroodX or #BroodXCicadas on social media.

LATEST NEWS:

Gene Kritsky has a new book about periodical cicadas & brood X. Check it out:

What, when, where, and why:

What are these cicadas?

Billions of these insects:

Adult, Nymph, Molting Cicada

  • Black, orange and red Cicada insects with a 17-year life cycle.
  • Some people call them “locusts” but they’re really cicadas.
  • Which species: All three 17-year species, Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini and Magicicada septendecula. How to tell the difference between the species.
  • NOT the green ones that arrive annually.

When will these cicadas emerge:

Typically beginning in May and ending in late June. These cicadas will begin to emerge approximately when the soil 8″ beneath the ground reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit. A nice, warm rain will often trigger an emergence. Back in 2004, people began reporting emergences around May, 13th, but if the weather is warmer, it might start in late April.

Other tips: these cicadas will emerge after the trees have grown leaves, and, by my own observation, around the same time Iris flowers bloom:

Magicicada on an iris flower in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi

Magicicada on an iris flower in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi

Where will these cicadas emerge:

Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org) has the most up to date maps. If you see a cicada and want to report it, the Cicada Safari App is available for Android and Apple devices 📱.

Places = cities, towns, communities, parts, etc. where people told us they emerged back in 2004.

  • Delaware counties: Kent, Sussex
  • Delaware places: Newark, Wilmington
  • Georgia counties: Union, White. Maybe Gilmer.
  • Georgia places: Blairsville, Ellijay, Norcross
  • Illinois counties: Edgar, Clark, Crawford, Vermilion
  • Illinois places: Marshall
  • Indiana counties: Brown, Clark, Clay, Columbus, Crawford, Daviess, Dearborn, Dubois, Fountain, Gibson, Greene, Jackson, Jefferson, Jennings, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Montgomery, Orange, Owen, Parke, Perry, Pike, Ripley, Spencer, Sullivan, Vanderburgh, Vigo, Warrick
  • Indiana places: Bloomington, Brookville, Clinton Falls, Dillsboro, Fishers, French Lick, Indianapolis, Lawrenceburg, Lexington, Martinsville, McCormick’s Creek State Park, Nashville, North Vernon, Skiles Test Park, Spencer
  • Kentucky counties: Boone, Breckenridge, Bullitt, Carroll, Daviess, Gallatin, Grayson, Henry, Jefferson, La Rue, McLean, Muhlenberg, Nelson, Ohio, Oldham, Trimble
  • Kentucky places: Big Bone Lick State Park, Covington, Dayton, Dry Ridge, Florence, Ft. Thomas, Georgetown, Hebron, Highland Heights, Louisville, Newport, Villa Hills.
  • Maryland counties: Allegany, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, Garrett, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince Georges, Washington
  • Maryland places: Abingdon, Annapolis, Aspen Hill, Baltimore, Bel Air, Beltsville, Berwyn Heights, Bethesda, Bowie, Brooklandville, Brooklyn Park, Catonsville, Chevy Chase, Clinton, Colesville, College Park, Columbia, Cockeysville, Crofton, Cumberland, District Heights, Eldersburg, Elkridge, Elkton, Ellicott City, Fair Hill, Fallston, Forestville, Gaithersburg, Gambrills, Germantown, Glen Burnie, Glenelg, Greenbelt, Gwynn Oak, Hagerstown, Hanover, Havre De Grace, Hillcrest Heights, Hunt Valley, Hyattsville, Hydes, Jessup, Landover Hills, Laurel, Lutherville, Odenton, Oella, Owings Mills, Pikesville, Potomac, Randallstown, Reisterstown, Riverdale, Rockville, Severna Park, Sharpsburg, Silver Spring, Takoma Park, Timonium, Towson, Wheaton
  • Michigan counties: Hillsdale, Washtenaw
  • Michigan places: Ann Arbor, Canton, Quincy
  • North Carolina counties: Cherokee, Surry, Wilkes
  • North Carolina places: Morganton, Murphy
  • New Jersey counties: Burlington, Hunterdon, Mercer, Salem
  • New Jersey places: Browns Mills, Harmony, Hillsborough, Holland Township, Kingwood Township, Lawrence, Merrill Creek Reservoir, Milford, Monmouth Junction, Morristown, Mt. Rose, Pennington, Princeton, Sourland Mountain, West Windsor Township. There’s an abundance of large parks and natural areas around Princeton.
  • New York counties: Suffolk (but extinct, or nearly so, but still look for themNewsday article)
  • New York places: All on Long Island, but based on the 2004 emergence, they might be extinct. Some were seen in East Setauket, Connetquot River State Park, Ronkonkoma, Stony Brook. In 1987 they were seen in Shirley, Ronkonkoma, Bohemia, Connetquot River State Park, Oakdale, and Setauket. Please read this article!
  • Ohio counties: Defiance, Franklin, Greene, Hamilton, Logan, Montgomery
  • Ohio places: Anderson Twp, Battelle Darby Park, Bellbrook, Centerville, Cincinnati, Columbus, Defiance, Delaware, Delhi Twp, Dublin, Fairfield, Galloway, Hamilton, Kettering, Lewisburg, Lockland, Miamisburg, Olmsted Falls, Oxford, Springfield, St. Bernard, West Carrollton, West Chester
  • Pennsylvania counties: Adams, Bedford, Berks, Bucks, Chester, Columbia, County, Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Lancaster, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Mercer, Montgomery, Northampton, Perry, Schuylkill, Somerset, York
  • Pennsylvania places:Archbald, Artemas, Bedford, Carroll Valley, Coopersburg, Dinosaur Rock, Downingtown, Gettysburg, Green Lane, Kintnersville, Lake Nockamixon, Lancaster, Lititz, Malvern, Mertztown, Mohnton, Mt Gretna, Oaks, Oley, Perkasie, Perkiomenville, Phoenixville, Pittston, Quakertown, Red Lion, Roaring Spring, Solebury, Spring Mount, Stewartstown, Topton, Upper Black Eddy, Warwick Park
  • Tennessee counties: Blount, Greene, Hamblen, Jefferson, Knox, Roane, Sumner, Wilson
  • Tennessee places: Copperhill, Farragut, Fayetteville, Knoxville, Oak Ridge.
  • Virginia counties: Arlington, Clarke, County, Dulles Smithsonian National Aircraft and Space Museum, Fairfax, Fauquier, Frederick, Shenandoah, Warren, Winchester
  • Virginia places: Alexandria, Annandale, Arlington, Ashburn, Centreville, Chantilly, Clearbrook, Del Ray, Doswell, Dunn Loring, Fairfax, Falls Church, Franconia, Hampton Roads, Haymarket, Herndon, Lorton, Lovettsville, Manassas, Merrifield, Oakton, Reston, Springfield, Sterling, Vienna, White Post, Winchester.
  • West Virginia counties: Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, Morgan
  • West Virginia places: Martinsburg, New Creek
  • Washington D.C.

More Location Tips:

Example Emergence Timeline

This is an example of a typical cicada emergence. The exact dates will depend on the weather and density of the emergence in your location. Hot weather means an early start and quicker finish to the season — cool weather means a later start, and a protracted season.

Example Emergence Timeline

Here’s an Excel version of the chart. Feel free to use it and adjust it to match your experience.

Oe watch the video version:

Why do cicadas:

Why do they stay underground for 17-years? The prevailing research suggests they’ve evolved a long, 17-year lifecycle to avoid predators that can sync up with their lifecycle & emergence. Why are there so many?! Research suggests that their huge numbers allow them to overwhelm predators, so enough of them will live on to breed and perpetuate the brood.

Should you plant?

If you’re planting trees, wait until July. If your yard doesn’t get cicadas by the first week of June, it’s probably safe to plant in June. Otherwise, you can use netting to keep cicadas from laying eggs in the branches of fragile trees. It’s the egg-laying that does damage. They usually avoid garden and flowering plants because their stems aren’t strong enough for an egg nest.

More facts and fun:

1907 Map from Marlatt, C.L.. 1907. The periodical cicada. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology.

See a modern map, or the Live Map from the Cicada Safari app.
Marlatt 1907 10 Brood X

January 1, 2021

Dan’s Cicada Diary for 1996

Filed under: Brood II | Cicada Mania | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 12:05 pm

Here’s something I wrote in 1996 to chronicle the Brood II cicada emergence in 1996. It’s probably meant to be semi-humorous.

Dan’s Cicada Diary for 1996.

Sunday, May 19th: Metuchen, New Jersey; I found the first desiccated cicada nymph exoskeleton on my patio. My cat disappears.


Tuesday, May 21st: I found about 40 nymph exoskeletons on my patio, a pine tree, and a maple tree. I also spotted an adult climbing the maple and two crippled adults rolling about the base of the tree.


Wednesday, May 22nd: Bonanza! I found about 500 adults perched on just about everything in my yard: trees, patio furniture, the foundation of my home, the garden hose, garbage cans, the missing cat’s water dish, my hair…just plain everywhere! Gruesome!


Saturday, May 25th: Avenel, New Jersey; Party at the Ritzow’s. Literally, hundreds of adult cicadas perched high above in oak trees sneer at decadent humans sipping martini’s, playing croquet. Bourgeois homo sapiens…bah humbug!


Thursday, May 30th: Metuchen, New Jersey; Still no sign of the cat. Sitting outside on my patio around 8:30 pm I hear a “snap”, “crackle” and “popping” sound. Rice Crispies? No. More like cicadas nymphs crawling out of their holes and onto my garden wall to molt into adulthood. Not the loveliest sight.


Saturday, June 1st: Westfield, New Jersey; Dave Wilson and Claire Adas’ wedding. A beautiful ceremony and reception, with the exception of the 9000 uninvited cicadas: crawling up people’s legs, crunching underfoot, landing in refreshments…a moment to cherish and remember!


Tuesday, June 4th: North Edison, New Jersey; The cicadas have begun to sing! All together they sound like a Boeing 767 is circling 40 feet overhead. The sound is that awesome. 10 inch deep piles of dying post-coitus adults litter the base of trees. The invasion has only begun!


Wednesday, June 5th – Monday, June 17th: Metuchen, North Edison, Colonia, Avenel, New Jersey; The invasion is in full effect! Homeowners in North Edison and Colonia report having to haul away the dying bodies of cicadas in wheelbarrows! Residents describe the cicadas’ combined mating screams as “loud as a UFO” [how do they know what a UFO sounds like?] and “like a Mack Truck was floating ten foot above your head”! Someone even told me cicadas taste like shrimp! I guess they made the best of a bad situation.


Wednesday, June 26th: Metuchen, New Jersey; It appears the invasion is over. All that remains is the dismembered, rotting corpses and the memories, sweet, sweet, memories. But remember, They’ll be back…in the year 2013!


Saturday, August 3rd: Metuchen, New Jersey; Looking out my second-story window I can clearly see the damage done by the 17-year cicadas. Brown patches of dead leaves speckle local oak and maple trees, revealing the branches where the female cicada has chosen to lay her eggs; an interesting “natural disaster”, but, not as heart-breaking as an earthquake or a flood. Clearly, the most provocative news regarding cicadas is the current hatch of annual cicadas, which are larger than the “17-year” cicadas (thoroughly illustrated within this web page) and greener. Another dissimilarity is the difference in their respective mating calls: while the “17-year” cicada makes a whirring sound somewhere between the motor of a vacuum cleaner and a car alarm, the “annual” cicada sounds more like a lawn sprinkler or maybe a sewing machine. Although I can clearly hear hundreds of “annual” cicadas and I have found their shells, I haven’t visually located a single one! Another cicada-related event has been the recent hatch of “cicada killer” wasps. These two-inch long giant wasps only prey upon, our friend, the defenseless cicada. I haven’t located these creatures either, but, they are definitely out there. Cicadas beware!


Wednesday, August 26th: Metuchen, New Jersey; the Tibicen cicadas continue to singɉ۬

Wednesday, November 6th: Metuchen, New Jersey; they are all dead or sucking on roots underground.


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