Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

April 14, 2020

Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000

Filed under: David Marshall | John Cooley | Leptopsaltriini | Magicicada | Periodical | United States — Tags: — Dan @ 7:36 pm

Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000.

Maybe a Magicicada neotredecim in Illinois

Song type: Call


Source: ©Insect Singers | Species: M. neotredecim

Video Playlist

Playlists contain multiple videos found on YouTube.

Identification Tips

Thick orange stripes on the abdomen. Orange between the eye and wing insertion. In the few areas it overlaps with M. tredecim, M. neotredecim sings with a higher pitch. Read more on Magicicada.org. It is similar to the 17-year species M. septendecim.

Brood Chart

Magicicada neotredecim has a 13-year life cycle.

Brood XIX (19)

XIX (19)
Years: 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024
Locations: AR, IL, IN, KS, KY, MO, OK

XXIII (23)

XXIII (23)
Years: 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028
Locations: AR, IL, IN, KY, MO

Name, Location and Description

  • Cicada Name: Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000
  • Short Name: M. neotredecim
  • Common Name: 13 Periodical Cicada or 13-Year Cicada or John and David’s Cicada
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 13 years.
  • Where it is found: AR, IA, IL, IN, KY, MO, TN
  • Maps: Map
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen. Orange between eye and wing.
  • Eye Color: reddish orange
  • Pronotal Collar Color: black
  • Identification: Bug Guide
  • Subject Matter Expert website: Magicicada.org
  • Taxonomic Information: Integrated Taxonomic Information System
  • Song: Magicicada.org

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Subtribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Magicicada.org.
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

March 20, 2020

Male Yezoterpnosia nigricosta photo by Osamu Hikino

Filed under: Japan | Leptopsaltriini | Osamu Hikino | Yezoterpnosia — Tags: — Dan @ 7:16 pm

Male Yezoterpnosia nigricosta photo by Osamu Hikino. Japan.

Male Yezoterpnosia nigricosta by Osamu Hikino

December 5, 2018

Tanna japonensis japonensis (Distant, 1892)

Filed under: Asia (Continent) | Genera Insectorum | Japan | Leptopsaltriini | Tanna | W. L. Distant — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Tanna japonensis japonensis (Distant, 1892) is a cicada found in Japan. There is another subspecies without a subspecies name (see below).

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Leptopsaltriini
SubTribe: Leptopsaltriina (which means slender harp player in Greek)
Genus: Tanna
Subspecies: Tanna japonensis japonensis (Distant, 1892)
Subspecies: Tanna japonensis var. ______ Ishihara, 1939

Photo by Osamu Hikino
Photo by Osamu Hikino.

Tanna genus description by W. L. Distant in Genera Insectorum, 1913:

Characters. — Head (including eyes) narrower than base of mesonotum and about as long as space between eyes; lateral margins of pronotum angularly sinuate, but not prominently toothed ; abdomen much longer than space between apex of head and base of cruciform elevation; tympana covered ; opercula small, not or scarcely extending beyond base of abdomen; rostrum reaching the posterior coxae; tegmina and wings hyaline. Closely allied to Leptopsaltria, from which it differs by only having a lateral tubercle on the second and not on the third ventral segment, in other respects resembling the genus Pomponia.

According to iNaturalist observations they’re found in July and August.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Current species name verified using Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).
  3. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

December 4, 2018

Purana conspicua Distant, 1910

Filed under: Asia (Continent) | Borneo | Genera Insectorum | Leptopsaltriini | Purana | W. L. Distant — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Purana conspicua Distant, 1910, is a cicada found in Borneo (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia).

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Leptopsaltriini
SubTribe: Leptopsaltriina
Genus: Purana
Species: Purana conspicua Distant, 1910

Purana conspicua Distant, 1910

Purana genus description by W. L. Distant in Genera Insectorum, 1913:

Characters. — Head (including eyes) as wide as base of mesonotum and as long as space between eyes; face prominent and convex, its base almost at right angles to the anterior lateral angles of vertex; pronotum narrowed anteriorly, its lateral margins angulated or toothed; mesonotum much longer than pronotum; abdomen moderately conical above, gradually attenuated posteriorly, in male considerably longer than the space between the apex of head and base of cruciform elevation, tubercles on the second and third ventral segments large and prominent; opercula small; tympanal coverings in male broader at base than long; rostrum reaching or a little passing posterior coxae; tegmina and wings hyaline.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Current species name verified using Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).
  3. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

November 28, 2018

Maua affinis Distant, 1905

Filed under: Borneo | Genera Insectorum | Leptopsaltriini | Maua | W. L. Distant — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Maua affinis Distant, 1905, is a cicada found in Borneo (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia).

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Leptopsaltriini
SubTribe: Leptopsaltriina
Genus: Maua
Species: Maua affinis Distant, 1905

Maua affinis Distant, 1905

Maua genus description by W. L. Distant in Genera Insectorum, 1913:

Characters. — Head (including eyes) as wide as base of mesonotum and as long or a little longer than space between eyes; face prominent and elongately convex, not in a line with vertex; pronotum narrowed anteriorly, its lateral margins angulated or toothed; mesonotum much longer than pronotum; abdomen broad, its apex about or almost as broad as base, in male not or scarcely longer than space between apex of head and base of cruciform elevation, tubercles on the second and third ventral segments very large and prominent, opercula small; tympanal coverings in male sometimes as long as, sometimes shorter than, breadth at base; rostrum reaching, generally considerably passing, the posterior coxa; tegmina and wings hyaline.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Current species name verified using Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

November 27, 2018

Leptopsaltria tuberosa (Signoret, 1847)

Leptopsaltria tuberosa (Signoret, 1847) is a cicada found in India, Japan, and on Java (Indonesia), according the the Genera Insectorum, 1913. That’s quite a range.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Leptopsaltriini
SubTribe: Leptopsaltriina
Genus: Leptopsaltria
Species: Leptopsaltria tuberosa (Signoret, 1847)

Leptopsaltria tuberosa (Signoret, 1847)

Leptopsaltria genus description by W. L. Distant in Genera Insectorum, 1913:

Characters. — Head (including eyes), considerably narrower than base of mesonotum, ocelli not quite twice the distance from eyes as from each other, front somewhat conical and subprominent; pronotum with the lateral margins moderately ampliated and more or less distinctly toothed or angulated; genae internally at apex near base of lorae furnished with a tubercle or tumescence; abdomen moderately long and robust; anterior femora distinctly and robustly spined; rostrum extending beyond the posterior coxae; tympana covered; opercula short; second and third abdominal segments in the male furnished with a well-developed tubercle near each lateral margin; tegmina and wings hyaline, venation normal, tegminal apical areas eight in number.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Current species name verified using Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).
  3. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1