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Magicicada periodical cicada Broods.

June 8, 2024

Periodical cicada Brood XIV (14) will emerge in 2025 in Thirteen States

Filed under: Brood XIV | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 8:53 am

Periodical cicada Brood XIV (14) will emerge in the spring of 2025 in Georgia, Kentucky, Indiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia. The last time this brood emerged was in 2008.

What, when, where:

What:

  • Millions of these:
    Adult, Nymph Molting
  • Cicada insects with a 17-year life cycle.
  • Some people call them “locusts” but they’re really cicadas.
  • Which species: All three 17-year species, Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini and Magicicada septendecula. How to tell the difference between the species.
  • NOT the green ones that arrive annually.

When: Typically beginning in mid-May and ending in late June. These cicadas will begin to emerge approximately when the soil 8″ beneath the ground reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit. A nice, warm rain will often trigger an emergence.

Other tips: these cicadas will emerge after the trees have grown leaves, and, by my own observation, around the same time Iris flowers bloom.

Where:

  • Georgia counties: Fannin, Lumpkin, Rabun, Union
  • Indiana counties: Crawford, Harrison, Perry
  • Kentucky counties: Adairville, Anderson, Barren, Bath, Bell, Bourbon, Boyd, Bracken, Campbell, Carter, Clinton, Edmonson, Fayette, Franklin, Floyd, Gallatin, Grant, Hardin, Harrison, Henderson, LaRue, Laurel, Leslie, Madison, Montgomery, Nelson, Nicholas, Pendleton, Pulaski, Rowan, Scott, Shelby, Whitley
  • Kentucky cities: Bowling Green, Corbin, Flemingsburg, Frankfort, Greensburg, Hazard, Radcliff, Richmond
  • Massachusetts counties: Barnstable, Plymouth
  • Maryland counties: Allegany, Washington
  • New Jersey counties: Atlantic, Camden, Ocean (NJ records are from older literature).
  • New York counties: Nassau, Suffolk
  • Ohio counties: Adams, Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Gallia, Hamilton, Highland, Ross, Warren
  • Ohio cities: Batavia, Cincinnati area, Loveland
  • North Carolina counties: Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, Henderson, McDowell, Mitchell, Wilkes
  • North Carolina cities: Asheville, Moravian Falls, north-west of Nashville, Wilkesboro
  • Pennsylvania counties: Adams, Berks, Blair, Cambria, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Cumberland, Huntingdon, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Lycoming, Mifflin, Montour, Northumberland, Snyder, Union
  • Pennsylvania cities: Bear Gap
  • Tennessee counties: Bledsoe, Blount, Campbell, Cheatham, Claiborne, Cocke, Coffee, Cumberland, Davidson, Grainger, Grundy, Hancock, Hawkins, Jefferson, Marion, Roane, Robertson, Rutherford, Sevier, Sumner, Williamson
  • Tennessee cities: Cades Cove, Muddy Pond,
  • Virginia counties: Botetourt, Lee, Russell, Scott, Smyth, Tazewell, Wise
  • West Virginia counties: Cabell, Kanawha, Mason, Mingo, Putnam, Wyoming
  • West Virginia cities: Huntington

More Location Tips:

More facts and fun:

1907 Map Marlatt, C.L.. 1907. The periodical cicada. Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology.

Marlatt 1907 14 Brood XIV

A more modern map made by Roy Troutman:

Brood XIV Map by Roy Troutman

May 9, 2024

Brood XXIII Cicada Stragglers are emerging!

Filed under: Brood XXIII | Chris Simon | Magicicada | Periodical Stragglers — Dan @ 6:24 pm

BROODXXIII

One phenomenal behavior of Magicicada periodical cicadas is they “straggle”, meaning they emerge earlier or later than the year they are expected. Typically they emerge 1 or 4 years before they’re supposed to emerge.

Brood XXIII is expected to emerge in four years in 2028, but enough are emerging in 2024 for cicada researchers like Chris Simon to take notice! She let us know about the stragglers on May 8th.

Brood XXIII is found in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. This is not a perfect map (it overlaps with Brood XIX), but XXIII cicadas will show up in that area.

Arkansas: Bayou Deview Wildlife Management Area, Poinsett County, Devalls Bluff, Harrisburg, Holland Bottoms, Jacksonville, Jonesboro, Knox Co., Lake Hogue, Lake Poinsett State Park, Little Rock, and Wynne.

Illinois: Anna, Carbondale, Carterville, Chester, Clinton Lake, Marissa and Robinson.

Indiana: Harmonie State Park, Hymera, Leanne, Richland, Sullivan And Posey Counties.

Kentucky: Benton, Calvert City, Gilbertsville, Henry County, Murray, and Paducah.

Louisiana: Bastrop, Choudrant, Grayson and West Monroe.

Mississippi: Alva, Arlington, Booneville, Brandon, Clinton, Corinth, Desoto County, Florence, French Camp, Hernando, Holcomb, Houlka, Jackson, New Albany, Oxford, Potts Camp, Silver Creek, Tishomingo, and Water Valley.

Tennessee: Atoka, Benton, Cordova, Henry County, Huntingdon, Jackson, Lavinia, Leach, Lexington, McNeary County, Memphis, Paris, Savannah, and Speedwell.

Here’s a blue overlay of there Brood XXIII emerges from the UCONN map on the iNaturalist data (as of May 5th):

Brood XXIII overlay

Surrounding the blue area on the west and east is Brood XIX and north will be Brood XIII.

More info:

April 20, 2024

A quick way to tell the difference between the 7 periodical cicadas species

Filed under: Brood XIII | Brood XIX | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 8:50 am

Here is a quick way to tell the difference between the 7 periodical cicada species:

Download this chart. Click/tap for a larger version:

The songs of Magicicada cassini (17-year) and Magicicada tredecassini (13-year) are essentially identical:

M. cassini:

M. tredecassini:

The songs of Magicicada septendecula (17-year) and Magicicada tredecula (13-year) are essentially identical:

M. septendecula (©Joe Green):

M. tredecula:

The songs of Magicicada septendecim (17-year), M. neotredecim (13-year), and Magicicada tredecim (13-year) are essentially identical. M. neotredecim varies the sound of its call in the presence of M. tredecim.

M. septendecim:

M. neotredecim (© Insect Singers)

M. tredecim (© Insect Singers)

And/or watch this video:

Then read this and listen to the sound files on the page: Where will 17 & 13 Year Periodical Cicada Broods emerge next?

February 1, 2024

New Brood XIX and XIII Cicada Book by Dr. Gene Kritsky

Filed under: Books | Brood XIII | Brood XIX | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 8:14 am

Cicada researcher and communicator Dr. Gene Kritsky has a new book about Brood XIX and XIII which are both emerging in the spring of 2024: A Tale of Two Broods: The 2024 Emergence of Periodical Cicada Broods XIII and XIX. It is available in paperback and Kindle formats.

A Tale of Two Broods: The 2024 Emergence of Periodical Cicada Broods XIII and XIX

Other posts about Dr. Gene Kritsky on this site:

  1. An Interview with Gene Kritsky
  2. Gene Kritsky’s new cicada site and Brood XIV news
  3. Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition by Gene Kritsky
  4. Gene’s App: Cicada Safari app for tracking Magicicada periodical cicadas

October 27, 2023

2024 Cicada Forecast

Filed under: Brood XIII | Brood XIX | Cicada Mania — Dan @ 9:17 pm

Updated on 5/30/2024.

2024 is the big year in the U.S.A. Two Magicicada Broods, Brood XIII (Thirteen) and Brood XIX (Nineteen, aka the Great Southern Brood) have emerged in the United States. People call these cicadas “locusts”, but they are cicadas.

Get ready for a zillion of these (if you’re in the right location):
Brood X header

Here’s a chart that shows where Brood XIX and Brood XIII are in their emergence cycle:

May 30th Update

about Brood XIX (WHICH HAS EMERGED and IS STARTING TO DIE OFF):

Brood XIX has a 13-year cycle, features four species, and is found in:

Alabama, north-west half of Arkansas, north-west Georgia, southeast Iowa, southern Illinois, south-west Indiana, western Kentucky, northern Louisiana, Maryland in St. Mary’s County, Missouri, Mississippi, central North Carolina, eastern Oklahoma, western South Carolina, Tennessee, eastern Virginia.

Big cities in the range of Brood XIX include Nashville (TN), Charlotte (NC), and St. Louis (MO), keeping in mind that they prefer the suburbs.

Read lots more about Brood XIX.

about Brood XIII (WHICH HAS EMERGED):

Brood XIII has a 17-year cycle, features three species, and is found in:

Eastern Iowa, northern Illinois, Indiana, near Lake Michigan, and southern Wisconsin. Though likely extinct, the brood once appeared in Michigan along the border with Indiana.

The largest city in Brood XIII is Chicago, Illinois, and the Lake County Forest Preserve in the suburbs of Chicago is a good place to visit for tourists. The Michigan part of the brood is likely extinct, so do not look there if you are a tourist.

Read lots more about Brood XIII.

Will the broods overlap?

They do not overlap! But, they come close in some areas.

Both Brood XIX and XIII exist in Macon, Sangamon, Livingston, and Logan counties in Illinois. The easily accessible place they come closest to overlapping is Springfield, Illinois, which is in Sangamon County. Compare this Brood XIII map with this Brood XIX.

People wonder what would happen if members of the broods mate. Their offspring would likely live and adopt either a 13 or 17-year life cycle. This will likely not happen because they don’t overlap, however, one experiment would be to get similar species from XIX and XIII and put them in an enclosure to see if they will mate.

Resources to get you through 2024

  1. A Tale of Two Broods: The 2024 Emergence of Periodical Cicada Broods XIII and XIX book by Dr. Gene Kritsky.
  2. The Cicada Safari app for iOS and Android to find and report cicadas.
  3. The University of Connecticut Periodical Cicadas website.
  4. An iNaturalist project was set up to track them.

Stragglers from other broods:

Magicicada stragglers from other broods will emerge in small numbers.

So far Brood XXIII and Brood XIV stragglers have been reported!

Annually emerging cicada species of North America:

Follow the progress of annual cicadas on our iNaturalist project.

In the United States, annual cicada emergences will happen like they did in 2023, with few surprises. Cicadas in southern locations will emerge first, with Quesada gigas emerging early on. Look at the chart on the cicada sounds page for a calendar of annual cicada emergences.

The cicadas that have a camouflage appearance are Neotibicen, like Neotibicen linnei aka Linne’s Cicada, or Megatibicen, Megatibicen resh aka Resh Cicada, and they are annual cicadas.

July 23 (small) 3
A Neotibicen tibicen is perhaps the most common annual cicada in North America.

Proto-periodical cicadas of North America (the fly fisher’s friend):

Emergences of proto-periodical cicadas depend on multiple factors including the species, crowding, location, and cumulative rainfall, making it hard to predict when they will emerge. We can’t say exactly when they’ll emerge in your location. Platypedia species, in particular, represent a “boon” to fly fishers, as they send fish into a feeding frenzy. The best bet for Platypedia cicadas is to tune into iNaturalist from April to June.

Platypedia
A Platypedia cicada, photo by CGWiber.

International species — World Wide Cicadas

A variety of cicadas

Generally speaking, cicadas in the Northern Hemisphere emerge somewhere between March and September, and in the Southern Hemisphere, somewhere between September and March. In places closer to the equator, like Ecuador, you can have cicadas for almost the entire year. You can use sites like iNaturalist and Cicada Mania to do research. iNaturalist compiles cicada identifications, including photos, sounds, and geographic data. Cicada Mania contains basic facts and historical and cultural knowledge.

There are periodical species of cicadas in Fiji and India. UPDATE! The “Leap-Year” brood of the Indian periodical cicada Chremistica ribhoi is currently emerging in the Kamrup District of Assam, India (4/25/2024).

iNaturalist by continent

on Cicada Mania by continent

You can also explore specific countries like…

iNaturalist by country:

on Cicada Mania by country:

More to come. Here is the 2023 Forecast.

October 18, 2023

Cicadas on leaves & trees – Brood V Magicicada from Morgantown, WV (2016), gallery #2

Filed under: Brood V | Magicicada | Photos & Illustrations — Dan @ 8:39 pm

This is a gallery of Magicicadas on leaves & trees from West Virginia University’s Core Arboretum from the 2013 Brood V emergence.

Visit Gallery #1 for more photos from Brood V.

Click/tap the image for a larger version:

Magicicada septedecula hiding
 Magicicada septedecula hiding

Magicicada septendecim on a leaf
Magicicada septendecim on a leaf

Magicicada with mustard eyes
Magicicada with mustard eyes

Magicicada with pale eyes
Magicicada with pale eyes

Many Exuvia on Oak Leaves
Many Exuvia on Oak Leaves

Red and Orange eyes
Red and Orange eyes

Teneral Magicicada on leaf
Teneral Magicicada on leaf

Three Magicicada
Three Magicicada

Three Magicicada
Three Magicicada

Three Magicicada
Three Magicicada

Under A Leaf
 Under A Leaf

Magicicada on leaves
Magicicada on leaves

Visit Gallery #1 for more photos from Brood V.

Core Arboretum – Brood V Magicicada from Morgantown, WV (2016), gallery #2

Filed under: Brood V | Eye Color | Magicicada | Photos & Illustrations — Dan @ 7:59 pm

This is a gallery of Magicicadas taken at West Virginia University’s Core Arboretum from the 2013 Brood V emergence.

Click/tap the images for larger versions.

Visit Gallery #1 from more photos From the Core Arboretum, Morgantown, and Brood V.

Magicicada cassini on tree plague:
Magicicada cassini on tree plague

Magicicada exit chimney:
Magicicada exit chimney

Magicicada septendecim abdomen:
Magicicada septendecim abdomen

Magicicada septendecim:
Magicicada septendecim

Magicicada with beige eyes:
Magicicada with beige eyes

Magicicada with damaged wings and beige eyes:
Magicicada with damaged wings and beige eyes

Magicicada with slightly orange markings on abdomen could be ‘decula or cassini:
Magicicada with slightly orange markings on abdomen could be decula or cassini

Magicicada with white eyes:
Magicicada with white eyes

Magicicada with white eyes:
Magicicada with white eyes

Male Magicicada septendecim abdomen:
Male Magicicada septendecim abdomen

Many Magicicada exuvia and corpses:
Many Magicicada exuvia and corpses

Visit Gallery #1 from more photos From the Core Arboretum, Morgantown, and Brood V.

Jim Thorpe Pennsylvania Magicicada Emergence Gallery #2

Filed under: Brood V | Magicicada | Photos & Illustrations — Tags: — Dan @ 5:35 pm

Jim Thorpe Pennsylvania Magicicada Emergence Gallery #2.
These images are from 2016, Brood V.
Click/tap the image for a larger version.
Visit Gallery #1 as well.

Many Magicicada on a tree in the shade:
Many Magicicada

Many Magicicada

Many Magicicada

Many Magicicada

Many Magicicada

Ovipositing Magicicada septendecim:
Ovipositing septendecim

Ovipositing septendecim

Two Magicicada septendecim:
Two septendecim

Zombie Cicada. Not Really, just dead:
Zombie Cicada – Not Really just dead

Visit Gallery #1 as well.

October 17, 2023

Roy Troutman’s 2013 Brood II cicada photos, gallery 3

When Roy Troutman visited New Jersey and New York in 2013 for Brood II he took a lot of great cicada photos.

Here is a sample of the best.
Click the images for a larger version.
Also visit Gallery #1 and Gallery #2.

Magicicada molting by Roy Troutman
Magicicada molting by Roy Troutman

Magicicada with exuvia by Roy Troutman
Magicicada with exuvia by Roy Troutman

Mustard eyed Magicicada septendecim by Roy Troutman
Mustard eyed Magicicada septendecim by Roy Troutman

Roy Troutman and Elias Bonaros at the Periodical Cicada display at the American Museum of Natural History, photo by Michelle Troutman
Roy Troutman, John Cooley, Ed Johnson and Dan Mozgai

Roy Troutman, John Cooley, Ed Johnson and Dan Mozgai
Roy Troutman and Elias Bonaros at the Periodical Cicada display at the American Museum of Natural History by Michelle Troutman

Teneral Magicada by Roy Troutman
Teneral Magicada by Roy Troutman

Roy Troutman’s 2013 Brood II cicada photos, gallery 2

When Roy Troutman visited New Jersey and New York in 2013 for Brood II he took a lot of great cicada photos.
Here is a sample of the best.
Click the images for a larger version.
Visit Gallery #1 and Gallery #3 as well.

John Cooley and Ed Johnson speaking at the Staten Island Museum Six Legged Sex event by Roy Troutman
John Cooley and Ed Johnson speaking at the Staten Island Museum Six Legged Sex event by Roy Troutman

Light Up Cicada Sculpture at the Staten Island Museum by Roy Troutman
Light Up Cicada Sculpture at the Staten Island Museum by Roy Troutman

Magicicada septendecim by Roy Troutman
M. septendecim by Roy Troutman

Magicicada cassini flying inbetween calling in Colonia NJ by Roy Troutman
Magicicada cassini flying inbetween calling in Colonia NJ by Roy Troutman

Magicicada cassini in flight in Colonia NJ by Roy Troutman
Magicicada cassini in flight in Colonia NJ by Roy Troutman

Magicicada corpses and exuvia by Roy Troutman
Magicicada corpses and exuvia by Roy Troutman

Magicicada mating by Roy Troutman
Magicicada mating by Roy Troutman

Magicicada exuvia by Roy Troutman
Magicicada exuvia by Roy Troutman

Magicicada septendecim mating by Roy Troutman
Magicicada septendecim mating by Roy Troutman

Magicicada staring at you by Roy Troutman
Magicicada staring at you by Roy Troutman

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