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May 27, 2020

Where will 17 & 13 Year Periodical Cicada Broods emerge next?

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17 & 13 Year Periodical Cicadas

🛑 This page is strictly for Magicicada periodical cicadas, aka 17 & 13-year cicadas, aka "locusts" (read why they’re called locusts).
This does not cover annual cicada species in North America and other parts of the world.

📅 Brood X will emerge in the spring of 2021.

Researchers need your help! If you see a cicada, please report it using the Cicada Safari App 📱, available for Android and Apple phones. See a Live Map of sightings.

Magicicada Brood Chart

The Brood Chart features the names of the broods (Roman numerals), their life cycle length, when they will emerge next, which states they’ll emerge in, links to Maps, the species that will emerge, and other information. Click the maps for larger, detailed maps.

Brood 17 or 13 Year Stragglers Probable States & Species
I (1) 17 1961, 1978, 1995, 2012, 2029 2025 (-4), 2028 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
States: TN, VA, WV
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_01/
II (2) 17 1962, 1979, 1996, 2013, 2030 2026 (-4), 2029 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
States: CT, GA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OK, PA, VA
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_02/
III (3) 17 1963, 1980, 1997, 2014, 2031 2027 (-4), 2030 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
States: IA, IL, MO
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_03/
IV (4) 17 1964, 1981, 1998, 2015, 2032 2028 (-4), 2031 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
States: IA, KS, MO, NE, OK, TX
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_04/
V (5) 17 1965, 1982, 1999, 2016, 2033 2029 (-4), 2032 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
States: LI NY, MD, OH, PA, VA, WV
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_05/
VI (6) 17 1966, 1983, 2000, 2017, 2034 2030 (-4), 2933 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. septendecula.
States: GA, NC, SC, WI, OH
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_06/
VII (7) 17 1967, 1984, 2001, 2018, 2035 2031 (-4), 2034 (-1) Species: M. septendecim.
States: NY
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_07/
VIII (8) 17 1968, 1985, 2002, 2019, 2036 2032 (-4), 2035 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
States: OH, PA, WV and OK
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_08/
IX (9) 17 1952, 1969, 1986, 2003, 2020 2033 (-4), 2036 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
States: NC, VA, WV
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_09/
X (10) 17 1953, 1970, 1987, 2004, 2021 2020 (-1), 2034 (-4), 2037 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
States: DE, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MI, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WV, Washington
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_10/
XIII (13) 17 1956, 1973, 1990, 2007, 2024 2020 (-4), 2023 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini.
States: IA, IL, IN, MI, WI
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_13/
XIV (14) 17 1957, 1974, 1991, 2008, 2025 2021 (-4), 2024 (-1) Species: M. septendecim, M. cassini, M. septendecula.
States: GA, IN, KY, MA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WV
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_14/
XIX (19) 13 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024 2020 (-4), 2023 (-1) Species: M. tredecim, M. neotredecim, M. tredecassini, M. tredecula.
States: AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, VA
Brood XIX mini map
XXII (22) 13 1975, 1988, 2001, 2014, 2027 2023 (-4), 2026 (-1) Species: M. tredecim, M. tredecassini, M. tredecula.
States: KY, LA, MS, OH
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_22/
XXIII (23) 13 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028 2024 (-4), 2027 (-1) Species: M. tredecim, M. neotredecim, M. tredecassini, M. tredecula.
States: AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, TN
http://magicicada.org/magicicada/brood_23/

When will they emerge?

📅 🌡️ Generally speaking, these cicadas will begin to emerge when the soil 8″ beneath the ground reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit (Heath, 1968). A nice, warm rain will often trigger an emergence. They typically emerge in May but have been known to emerge in late April or early June. It all depends on the weather.

What should you look for before they emerge?

Chimneys / Turrets

Look for cicada chimneys a.k.a. turrets. These are structures cicadas build out of the soil, positioned above the hole where they will emerge.

Chimney

Holes

Look for holes the diameter of an adult’s finger near the root system of a tree. These are sure signs that cicadas will emerge in the area.

Holes

Cicadas Under Stones & Slates

You might discover some cicada nymphs while turning over stones or when performing landscaping chores.

Cicada tunneling under slate

What do they look like when they emerge:

Here is a great video of Magicicada nymphs once they have emerged from the ground:


Nymph

This is a recently emerged nymph crawling up a tree. Note that its eyes are red.

Nymph

Once cicadas nymphs have emerged from the ground, they will try to find a tree (or similar vertical surface), and then begin the process of shedding their old nymph skins (ecdysis), expanding their wings, and changing to their adult coloring. Watch this amazing transformation.

Teneral

How to tell the difference between the seven Magicicada species:

The first way is based on the Brood. Take a look at the Brood chart above, and see which species appear with the Brood.

There are 3 basic types of Magicicada: “‘Decims”, “‘Cassini” and “‘Deculas”.

“Decims” aka Pharaoh Cicadas

There are three species in this category:

  1. Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758). 17-year life cycle. Broods: I-X, XIII, XIV.
  2. Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley 2000. 13-year life cycle. Broods: XIX, XXIII.
  3. Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868). 13-year life cycle. Brood: XIX, XXII, XXIII.

Their songs are very similar, however, when M. neotredecim & M. tredecim emerge in the same location, M. neotredecim’s song takes a higher pitch. Sounds like “Pharaoh, Pharaoh!”.

Visual Appearance:

M. septendecim
Male on left; Female on right.

M. neotredecim & M. septendecim have broad orange stripes with more orange than black on their abdomens.

M. tredecim
M. tredecim, by comparison, have almost entirely orange abdomens.

eye to wing
M. septendecim also have an area of orange coloring between the eye and the wing (pronotal extension).

“Cassini” aka Dwarf Cicadas

There are two species in this category:

  1. Magicicada cassini (Fisher, 1851). 17-year life cycle. Broods: I-V, VIII-X, XIII, XIV.
  2. Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962. 13-year life cycle. Broods: XIX, XXII, XXII.

Their songs are essentially identical:

M. cassini Call and Court:

Note how it makes a quick burst of sound, followed by some rapid clicks.

Visual Appearance:

M. cassini
Female on left; Male on right.
M. tredecassin & M. cassini have black abdomens with virtually no orange at all. Orange stripes are possible in the mid-west (important to note for Brood IV).

“Decula”

There are two species in this category:

  1. Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962. 17-year life cycle. Broods: I-VI, VIII-X, XIII, XIV.
  2. Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962. 13-year life cycle. Broods: XIX, XXII, XXIII.

Their songs are essentially identical:

M. tredecula Call:

Note the “tick, tick, tick” rhythm of the call.

Visual Appearance:

M. septendecula
Female on left; Male on right.
M. septendecula & M. tredecula have stripes that feature more black than orange. Otherwise, they’re very similar to M. cassini.

How to figure out if they’re coming to your town?

  1. Verify that they’re coming to your state. Check the Magicicada Brood Chart on this page.
  2. Check Cicada Brood Maps linked from this page to see if they’re coming to your general area.
  3. Check to see if they’re coming to your neighborhood. Good sources include:
    1. Check the Cicada Central Magicicada Database to see the counties where cicadas have appeared in the past.
    2. Ask someone who lived there 17 (or 13) years before.
    3. Old timers (hint: old timers usually call them locusts).
    4. Check your local Library for old newspaper articles.
    5. Check with a local college: contact the entomology, forestry, or agriculture-related departments.
    6. Your local national, state, county and town parks department (parks and rec). Some county parks departments plan events around cicada emergences.
  4. When will they emerge?
    1. They will emerge sometime in the Spring, for sure.
    2. They typically emerge once the soil 8 inches (20 cm) below the surface gets to 64 degrees Fahrenheit (18 degrees Celcius). At that temperature, they will start digging their tunnels to the surface. After a couple of days with above-ground temperatures near the 80’s F, and after a good rain, they will definitely emerge. Read this paper for more info: Thermal Synchronization of Emergence in Periodical “17-year” Cicadas (Homoptera, Cicadidae, Magicicada) by James Edward Heath, American Midland Naturalist, Vol. 80, No. 2. (Oct., 1968), pp. 440-448.
    3. Cicadas in sunny areas of your yard will emerge before cicadas in shady areas.
    4. Cicadas in the southern-most states will emerge before cicadas in northern states.
    5. You can try the Cicada Emergence Formula as well.
  5. If you don’t want them do damage your young / ornamental trees
    1. Spray them off with a garden hose.
    2. Foil around the trunk (to keep them from crawling up) (thanks Deborah).
    3. Insect barrier tape.
    4. Netting placed around & over the tree. “Insect barrier netting”. “Fruit tree covers”.
    5. Bagpipes (no joke, it worked at my friend’s wedding).
    6. Don’t use pesticide – we like all insects (especially pollinating bees).
  6. Are you scared of insects?
    • Unlike some other insects & arthropods. cicadas are not poisonous or venomous.
    • Try a hat, an umbrella, a bee-keepers’ outfit, a suit of armor…
  7. They’re coming, and they’re going to ruin my wedding!

Questions about the Brood Chart

Question: Why do I have cicadas in my neighborhood, but your chart indicates that I shouldn’t?

Answer: Some possibilities: 1) they are stragglers, periodical cicadas that emerge too soon or late, 2) they are not periodical cicadas, but are a different North American species, 3) you live on a continent other than North America, in which case, try one of these pages, or 4) SURPRISE! The U.S. is a big place and some cicada populations have yet to be documented.


Question: Why don’t I have periodical cicadas in my area, but the information on your website indicates that I should?

Answer: Two possibilities: 1) they went extinct or otherwise died off in your area, or 2) they aren’t everywhere in a state – normally there are large gaps in their range.


Question: What are stragglers?

Answer: Stragglers can emerge 1 or 4 years early or 1 or 4 years late. Don’t be surprised if you see some periodical cicadas emerge earlier than planned this year. 17-year brood members are most likely to straggle 4 years early, and 13-year brood members are most likely to straggle 4 years late. Straggler probability chart.


Question: Why are there no Brood XI, XII, XV, XVI… ?

Answer: Perhaps you’ve noticed there are no Broods XI (11), XII (12), XV (15), XVI (16), XVII (17), XVIII (18), XX (20), XXI (21), XXIV (24), etc. Don’t worry about that. They never existed or are extinct (XI, XXI).


More Magicicada websites:

  1. For much more information about 17-year cicadas visit Magicicada.org. The maps on this page link to that site.
  2. The Cicada Safari App is available for Android and Apple devices 📱. Use it to see where people are finding cicadas, and to report your own sightings.
  3. Check the Cicada Central Magicicada Database to see the counties where cicadas have appeared in the past. For more information about this database and cicada research in general, visit the Simon Lab website.

More Magicicada Information

April 14, 2020

Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

Filed under: Lamotialnini,Magicicada,Periodical,United States — Tags: — Dan @ 8:50 pm

Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

Magicicada tredecula 2014 Ohio

Song type: Chorus


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. tredecula

Song type: Call


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. tredecula

Song type: Call


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. tredecula

Identification Tips

Smaller than M. neotredecim & M. tredecim. Orange stripes on its abdomen, through not as much as M. neotredecim & M. tredecim. Its chorus sounds like a ticking clock. Very similar to the 17-year M. septendecula.

Video Playlist

Playlists contain multiple videos found on YouTube.

Brood Chart

Magicicada tredecula has a 13-year lifecycle.

Brood Year States
XIX (19) 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024 AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, VA
XXII (22) 1975, 1988, 2001, 2014, 2027 KY, LA, MS, OH
XXIII (23) 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028 AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, TN

Name, Location and Description

  • Cicada Name: Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962
  • Short Name: M. tredecula
  • Common Name: 13-Year Cicada or 13-Year Decula
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 13 years.
  • Where it is found: AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA
  • Maps: Map
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen.
  • Eye Color: reddish orange
  • Pronotal Collar Color: black
  • Identification: Bug Guide
  • Subject Matter Expert website: Magicicada.org
  • Taxonomic Information: Integrated Taxonomic Information System
  • Song: Magicicada.org

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Subtribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Magicicada.org.
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868)

Filed under: Lamotialnini,Magicicada,Periodical,United States — Tags: — Dan @ 8:30 pm

Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868).

Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868)
Photo credit: by Dan Mozgai. Ohio.

All Magicicada tredecim information and images on cicadamania.com.

Song type: Call


Source: ©Insect Singers | Species: M. tredecim

Identification tips:

Similar to M. neotredecim, but the abdomen is typically more orange — these species overlap in limited areas, in which M. tredecim maintains the normal pitch of its call, and M. neotredecim raises its pitch. Read more on Magicicada.org. Larger than M. tredecassini and M. tredecula.

Brood chart

Magicicada tredecim has a 13-year life cycle.

Brood Year States
XIX (19) 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024 AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, VA
XXII (22) 1975, 1988, 2001, 2014, 2027 KY, LA, MS, OH
XXIII (23) 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028 AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, TN

Name, Location and Description

  • Cicada Name: Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868)
  • Short Name: M. tredecim
  • Common Name: 13-Year Cicada or 13-Year Decim
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 13 years.
  • Where it is found: AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA
  • Maps: Map
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen. Orange between eye and wing.
  • Eye Color: reddish orange
  • Pronotal Collar Color: black
  • Identification: Bug Guide
  • Subject Matter Expert website: Magicicada.org
  • Taxonomic Information: Integrated Taxonomic Information System
  • Song: Magicicada.org

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Subtribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868)

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Magicicada.org
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962

Filed under: Lamotialnini,Magicicada,Periodical,United States — Tags: — Dan @ 8:09 pm

Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962.

Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962
Photo credit: by Dan Mozgai

All Magicicada tredecassini information and images on cicadamania.com.

Song type: Call


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. tredecassini

Identification Tips

Its abdomen is black. Its chorus sounds like hissing static. It is smaller than M. neotredecim and M. tredecim. It is very similar to the 17-year M. cassinii species.

Brood Chart

Magicicada tredecassini has a 13-Year lifecycle.

Brood Year States
XIX (19) 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024 AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, VA
XXII (22) 1975, 1988, 2001, 2014, 2027 KY, LA, MS, OH
XXIII (23) 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028 AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, TN

Name, Location and Description

  • Cicada Name: Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962
  • Short Name: M. tredecassini
  • Common Name: 13-Year Cicada or 13-Year Cassini
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 13 years.
  • Where it is found: AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA
  • Maps: Map
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs.
  • Eye Color: reddish orange
  • Pronotal Collar Color: black
  • Identification: Bug Guide
  • Subject Matter Expert website: Magicicada.org
  • Taxonomic Information: Integrated Taxonomic Information System
  • Song: Magicicada.org

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Sub-Tribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Magicicada.org.
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

Filed under: Lamotialnini,Magicicada,Periodical,United States — Tags: — Dan @ 5:59 pm

Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962
Photo credit: by Dan Mozgai. Brood II, New Jersey.

All Magicicada septendecula info and images on cicadamania.com.

Song type: Call


Source: ©Joe Green | Species: M. septendecula

Song type: Call


Source: ©Joe Green | Species: M. septendecula

Video

Video Playlist

Playlists contain multiple videos found on YouTube.

Identification Tips

M. septendecula is smaller than M. septedecim, and about the same size as M. cassisii. It typically has small (small compared to M. septedecim) orange stripes on its abdomen. It lacks the orange color between the eyes that M. septendecim has. Its chorus sounds like a ticking clock.

Brood Chart

Magicicada septendecula has a 17-year lifecycle.

Brood Year States
I (1) 1961, 1978, 1995, 2012, 2029 TN, VA, WVA
II (2) 1962, 1979, 1996, 2013, 2030 CT, GA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OK, PA, VA
III (3) 1963, 1980, 1997, 2014, 2031 IA, IL, MO
IV (4) 1964, 1981, 1998, 2015, 2032 IA, KS, MO, NE, OK, TX
V (5) 1965, 1982, 1999, 2016, 2033 LI NY, western MD, east OH, south-west PA, north-west VA, northern half of WV
VI (6) 1949, 1966, 1983, 2000, 2017 GA, NC, SC, WI, OH
VIII (8) 1951, 1968, 1985, 2002, 2019 OH, PA, WVA and OK
IX (9) 1952, 1969, 1986, 2003, 2020 NC, VA, WVA
X (10) 1953, 1970, 1987, 2004, 2021 DE, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MI, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WVA, Washington DC
XIV (14) 1957, 1974, 1991, 2008, 2025 GA, IN, KY, MA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WVA

Name, Location and Description

  • Cicada Name: Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962
  • Short Name: M. septendecula
  • Common Name: Decula Periodical Cicdada or 17-Year Cicada
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 17 years.
  • Where it is found: GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MO, NC, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, TN, VA, WV
  • Maps: Map
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen.
  • Eye Color: reddish orange
  • Pronotal Collar Color: black
  • Identification: Bug Guide
  • Subject Matter Expert website: Magicicada.org
  • Taxonomic Information: Integrated Taxonomic Information System
  • Song: Magicicada.org

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Sub-Tribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Magicicada.org
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758) aka Linnaeus’s 17-Year Cicada

Filed under: Lamotialnini,Magicicada,Periodical,United States — Tags: — Dan @ 5:30 pm

Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758) aka Linnaeus’s 17-Year Cicada aka Decim Periodical Cicada aka Pharaoh Cicada.

Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758)
Photo credit: by Dan Mozgai. Brood II, NJ.

Male Magicicada septendecim Metuchen NJ. Abdomen
Photo credit: by Dan Mozgai. Brood II, NJ.

All Magicicada septendecim information and images on cicadamania.com.

Song type: Distress


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. septendecim

Song type: Court II


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. septendecim

Song type: Call


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. septendecim

Song type: Court III


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. septendecim

Song type: Court I


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. septendecim

Video

Video Playlist

Playlists contain multiple videos found on YouTube.

Identification Tips

M. septendecim is the largest of the 17-Year species. Its abdomen has thick orange stripes. It has orange coloring between its eye and wing. Its song sounds like “Wee-Oh”, “Pharaoh” and a group of them are said to sound like a “UFO from a science fiction movie”.

Color between the eye and wing insertion:
color magicicada septendecim

M. septendecim Brood Chart

Magicicada septendecim has a 17-year lifecycle.

Brood Years States
I (1) 1961, 1978, 1995, 2012, 2029 TN, VA, WVA
II (2) 1962, 1979, 1996, 2013, 2030 CT, GA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OK, PA, VA
III (3) 1963, 1980, 1997, 2014, 2031 IA, IL, MO
IV (4) 1964, 1981, 1998, 2015, 2032 IA, KS, MO, NE, OK, TX
V (5) 1965, 1982, 1999, 2016, 2033 LI NY, western MD, east OH, south-west PA, north-west VA, northern half of WV
VI (6) 1949, 1966, 1983, 2000, 2017 GA, NC, SC, WI, OH
VII (7) 1950, 1967, 1984, 2001, 2018 NY
VIII (8) 1951, 1968, 1985, 2002, 2019 OH, PA, WVA and OK
IX (9) 1952, 1969, 1986, 2003, 2020 NC, VA, WVA
X (10) 1953, 1970, 1987, 2004, 2021 DE, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MI, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WVA, Washington DC
XIII (13) 1956, 1973, 1990, 2007, 2024 IA, IL, IN, MI, WI
XIV (14) 1957, 1974, 1991, 2008, 2025 GA, IN, KY, MA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WVA

Name, Location and Description

  • Cicada Name: Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • Short Name: M. septendecim
  • Common Name: Decim Periodical Cicada or Linnaeus’s 17-Year Cicada or 17-Year Cicada
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 17 years.
  • Where it is found: CT, DC, DE, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MA, MD, MI, MO, NC, NE, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, SC, TN, VA, WI, WV
  • Maps: Map
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen. Orange between eye and wing.
  • Eye Color: reddish orange
  • Pronotal Collar Color: black
  • Identification: Bug Guide
  • Identification: Bill Reynolds on iNaturalist
  • Subject Matter Expert website: Magicicada.org
  • Image: Insect Images
  • Taxonomic Information: Integrated Taxonomic Information System
  • Song: Magicicada.org

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Subtribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758)

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Magicicada.org
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

Magicicada cassinii (Fisher, 1852) aka Cassini 17-Year Cicada

Filed under: Lamotialnini,Magicicada,Periodical,United States — Tags: — Dan @ 5:04 pm

Magicicada cassinii (Fisher, 1852) aka Cassini 17-Year Cicada.

Magicicada cassini; Brood X straggler

Female Magicicada cassini Colonia NJ

All Magicicada cassinii images & info on cicadamania.com.

Song type: Distress


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. cassini

Song type: Chorus


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. cassini

Song type: Call


Source: ©Joe Green | Species: M. cassini

Song type: Chorus


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. cassini

Video

Video Playlist

Playlists contain multiple videos found on YouTube.

Identification Tips

M. cassinii differs from other Magicicada in that its abdomen is typically all black, with no orange. Exceptions occur in the mid-west, the occasional mosaic pigment mutation. It also lacks the orange coloring between the eye and wing that M. septendecim has. Its chorus sounds like hissing static.

M. cassini Brood Chart

Magicicada cassinii has a 17-year lifecycle.

Brood Years States
I (1) 1961, 1978, 1995, 2012, 2029 TN, VA, WVA
II (2) 1962, 1979, 1996, 2013, 2030 CT, GA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OK, PA, VA
III (3) 1963, 1980, 1997, 2014, 2031 IA, IL, MO
IV (4) 1964, 1981, 1998, 2015, 2032 IA, KS, MO, NE, OK, TX
V (5) 1965, 1982, 1999, 2016, 2033 LI NY, western MD, east OH, south-west PA, north-west VA, northern half of WV
VIII (8) 1968, 1985, 2002, 2019, 2026 OH, PA, WVA and OK
IX (9) 1952, 1969, 1986, 2003, 2020 NC, VA, WVA
X (10) 1953, 1970, 1987, 2004, 2021 DE, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MI, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WVA, Washington DC
XIII (13) 1956, 1973, 1990, 2007, 2024 IA, IL, IN, MI, WI
XIV (14) 1957, 1974, 1991, 2008, 2025 GA, IN, KY, MA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, WV

Name, Location and Description

  • Cicada Name: Magicicada cassinii (Fisher, 1852)
  • Short Name: M. cassinii
  • Common Name: Dwarf Periodical Cicada, Cassini Periodical Cicada or 17-Year Cicada
  • Synonym/Former Name: Magicicada cassini
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 17 years.
  • Where it is found: GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MD, MO, NC, NE, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, TN, TX, VA, WI, WV
  • Maps: Map
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs.
  • Eye Color: reddish orange
  • Pronotal Collar Color: black
  • Identification: Bug Guide
  • Identification: iNaturalist
  • Subject Matter Expert website: Magicicada.org
  • Taxonomic Information: Integrated Taxonomic Information System
  • Song: Magicicada.org

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Sub-Tribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada cassinii (Fisher, 1852)

List of sources

  • Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  • Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  • Locations: Magicicada.org
  • Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  • Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1–64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

January 10, 2019

Chrysolasia guatemalena (Distant, 1883)

Chrysolasia guatemalena (Distant, 1883) is a cicada found in Guatemala.

Special note: this cicada might be related to the Magiciada (17/13 year cicadas) cicadas found in the U.S.

Chrysolasia guatemalena was formerly known as Tibicen guatemalenus.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Genus: Chrysolasia
Species: Chrysolasia guatemalena (Distant, 1883)

Note from David Marshall in the comments: “This genus has been moved to the tribe Lamotialnini (see Marshall et al. 2018). Interestingly, that makes it the closest known relative of Magicicada in the Americas.”


The image says Tibicen guatemalenus, but its newest name is Chrysolasia guatemalena.

Species description by W. L. Distant:

Obscure castaneous, somewhat thickly covered with ochraceous pilosity. Area of the ocelli, a central fascia to pronotum (which is ampliated and produced on each side at anterior and posterior margins), some obscure and irregular spots on mesonotum with cruciform elevation at base, and abdomen above fuscous. Body beneath much paler and very densely pilose; head, sternum, and opercula ashy grey; abdomen pale ochraceous. Tegmina pale hyaline; costal membrane, basal area, and claval base pale castaneous; veins pale fuscous. Wings pale hyaline ; veins and suffusion at abdominal area pale fuscous.

Head, including outer margin of eyes, broader than pronotum; face with a broad central longitudinal sulcation and somewhat faintly transversely striate; rostrum not quite reaching posterior coxae; opercula reaching base of second abdominal segment, narrowest at base, with the outer margins truncate, widened and rounded posteriorly, but not quite meeting inwardly.

Long. 20 millim., exp. tegm. 57 millim.

References:

  1. The illustration, location and description comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

December 22, 2013

Macro photo of a Floury Baker

Filed under: Aleeta,Australia,Lamotialnini — Dan @ 5:50 am

Floury Baker

This is a wonderful macro photo of a Floury Baker (Aleeta curvicosta) from Australia. Thanks to Cameron for posting this photo on our Facebook page.

January 11, 2007

It’s a Floury Baker aka Aleeta curvicosta

Filed under: Aleeta,Australia,Lamotialnini — Tags: — Dan @ 6:29 am

Michelle Thompson took this picture of a cicada on the trunk of her oak tree in Willoughby in Sydney Australia. It’s a Floury Baker aka Aleeta curvicosta.

Floury Baker