Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

July 12, 2020

Chicago Area Periodical Cicada Emergences in 2020

Filed under: Accelerations | Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical Stragglers | United States — Dan @ 10:04 am

Many periodical cicadas emerged four years early in the Chicago area in 2020. These cicadas belong to the Brood XIII (13) which is set to emerge in 2024, and last emerged in 2007. Periodical cicadas often emerge in years proceeding or following the year their brood is expected to emerge. This phenomenon is called straggling. Most of the time these “stragglers” emerge in small numbers and are quickly eaten by predators, and do not go on to sing, chorus (synchronized singing for the purpose of attracting females), mate, and lay eggs. Sometimes they emerge in numbers large enough to survive, chorus and reproduce — this seems to have happened in the Chicago area in 2020. It is thought this this is how new broods formed over the millennia — cicadas emerge 4 or 1 year early in significant numbers and form a new brood. When enough stragglers emerge to successfully reproduce it is called an acceleration.

So, is a new brood forming around Chicago? Is this due to climate change or localized “heat islands”? Will the progeny of these stragglers emerge in 13, 17 or 21 years? Lots of questions — but we’ll need to wait quite some time to answer them.

There is a precedence for Brood XIII cicadas straggling in the Chicago area:

In 1969 massive numbers of periodical cicadas emerged in the Chicago suburbs 1 (Williams, K.S. & Simon, C. 1995).

In 1986, another 4-year acceleration was observed in the Chicago area by Monte Lloyd 1.

In 2003, many people left observations on our forums. Observations were made in Glenview, Flossmoor, Riverside, Downers Grove, Homewood, Westmont, Oak Park, and Hinsdale. Here are some examples:

Magicicada emerging this evening

Date: Wednesday, Jun/4/2003

Message: As I went for a walk this evening I noticed quite a few periodic cicadas emerging in the grass, crawling on the sidewalks and on the trunks of trees. This is not our year for the 17-year brood. We should not have them until 2007. Has anyone else in the Chicago area seen these cicadas? — Sue, Flossmoor, IL

Cicada singing

Date: Monday, Jun/9/2003

Message: I heard the cicadas singing for the first time this morning after my walk. Now that I have my doors open I can hear them on and off. — Sue, Flossmoor, IL

In 2020 many people left comments on the Brood XIII page, emailed us (thanks Neil) and left sightings via the Cicada Safari app.

1Williams, K.S. & Simon, C. 1995. The Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution of Periodical Cicadas. Annual Review of Entomology. Vol. 40:269-295 (https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.en.40.010195.001413).

April 18, 2020

Brood XIII (13) will emerge in 2024 in Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin and Indiana

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 1:02 am

Some Brood XIII “stragglers” emerged early in 2020. If you see a cicada and want to report it, the Cicada Safari App is available for Android and Apple devices 📱.

A particularly large amount of Brood XIII cicadas are emerging early this year. Here’s a news article and a note from the Illinois Extension. Thanks Neil for the links.

One thing that is important to determine is whether any of the off-schedule populations (especially the 4-year early and 4-year late ones) are large enough to persist and lay eggs. The big question is will they establish a new population? Please send photos of cicadas laying eggs. And if egg laying is extensive enough to damage branches, please send photos of that as well!

Some Brood XIII cicadas are emerging 4 years early, particularly in the Chicago area in 2020. Blue in the map below:

May 30 map - Now with Brood V

Periodical cicada Brood XIII (13) will emerge in the spring of 2024 in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and possibly Michigan. The last time this brood emerged was in 2007.

Special note: Brood XIX (19) will also emerge in 2024.

What, when, where, and why:

What:

Millions of these:
Adult, Nymph, Molting Cicada

  • Cicada insects with a 17-year life cycle.
  • Some people call them “locusts” but they’re really cicadas.
  • Which species: All three 17-year species, Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini and Magicicada septendecula. How to tell the difference between the species.
  • NOT the green ones that arrive annually.

When: Typically beginning in mid-May and ending in late June. These cicadas will begin to emerge approximately when the soil 8″ beneath the ground reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit. A nice, warm rain will often trigger an emergence.

Other tips: these cicadas will emerge after the trees have grown leaves, and, by my own observation, around the same time Iris flowers bloom.

Where:

Magicicada.org has the most up to date maps.

  • Illinois places: Belvidere, Brookfield, Channahon, Chicago, Des Plaines River Trail, Downers Grove, Elmhurst, Flossmoor, Geneva, Glen Ellyn, Highland Park, Hinsdale , Homewood, La Grange , Lagrange Woods, Lake Forest, Lansing, Lincolnshire, Lisle, Lombard, MacArthur Woods Forest Preserve, Marseilles, McHenry, McKinley Woods, Morton Arboretum, Naperville, Northbrook, Ogden, Ottawa, Palos Heights, River Forest , River Grove, Romeoville, Schiller Park, Thornton, Vernon Hills, Villa Park, Weaton, Western Springs, Westmont, Wonder Lake, and more.
  • Illinois counties: Bureau, Carroll, Cass, Cook, DuPage, Fulton, Grundy, Henderson, Henry, Jo Daviess, Kankakee, Lake, LaSalle, Livingston, Logan, Marshall, Mason, McHenry, McLean, Menard, Peoria, Putnam, Sangamon, Stark, Tazewell, Whiteside, Will, Winnebago, Woodford.
  • Iowa places: Atalissa, Solon, and more.
  • Iowa counties: Benton, Black Hawk, Bremer, Cedar, Dubuque, Henry, Iowa, Johnson, Jones, Linn, Louisa, Muscatine, Scott, Tama.
  • Wisconsin places: Aurora University, Big Foot Beach State Park, Lake Geneva, Moraine Nature Preserve, and more.
  • Wisconsin counties: Crawford, Grant, Green. Rock, Walworth.
  • Indiana places: Crown Point, Portage, Purdue-North Central, Valparaiso, and more.
  • Indiana counties: LaPorte, Porter, Lake.
  • Michigan: According to Magicicada.org, Magicicada have been found along the border of Michigan and Indiana.

More Location Tips:

Why: Why do they stay underground for 17-years? The prevailing research suggests they’ve evolved a long, 17-year lifecycle to avoid predators that can sync up with their lifecycle & emergence. Why are there so many?! Research suggests that their huge numbers allow them to overwhelm predators, so enough of them will live on to breed and perpetuate the brood.

More facts and fun:

1907 Map from Marlatt, C.L.. 1907. The periodical cicada. Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology.

See a modern map, or the Live Map from the Cicada Safari app.
Marlatt 1907 13 Brood XIII

March 24, 2020

Cicada Carousel Ride at the Brookfield Zoo

Filed under: Brood XIII | Pop Culture — Dan @ 6:04 pm

Cicada Carousel Ride at the Brookfield Zoo, in Brookfield, Illinois. 2007 in celebration of Brood XIII.

Cicada Carousel Ride at the Brookfield Zoo

Cicada Carousel Ride at the Brookfield Zoo

March 22, 2020

Lake Count Forest Preserves Cicada Mania! Festival, part 4

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Tags: — Dan @ 5:19 pm

Here’s some photos from the Cicada Mania! Festival at the Lake Count Forest Preserves at Ryerson Woods back in 2008 for the Brood XIII Magicicada emergence.

Skip to Part 1, Part 2, or Part 3.

Magicicada cicadas. Most, if now all are Magicicada septendecim:

Cicada on a leg. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada on a hand. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada septendecim.

Updating Magicicada back at my hotel room (giant Alien Ware laptop):
Updating cicadamania.com

Lake Count Forest Preserves Cicada Mania! Festival, part 3

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 5:13 pm

Here’s some photos from the Cicada Mania! Festival at the Lake Count Forest Preserves at Ryerson Woods back in 2008 for the Brood XIII Magicicada emergence.

Skip to Part 1, Part 2, or Part 4.

These are photos of Magicicada, most if not all are Magicicada septendecim:

Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

3 Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Lake Count Forest Preserves Cicada Mania! Festival, part 2

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 5:07 pm

Here’s some photos from the Cicada Mania! Festival at the Lake Count Forest Preserves at Ryerson Woods back in 2008 for the Brood XIII Magicicada emergence.

Skip to Part 1, Part 3, or Part 4.

A photo of Magicicada on a wall:
Cicada photo. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicadas around the world plaque:
Card. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Pomponia imperator:
Pomponia. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicadas of Australia:
Cicadas of Australia. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Salvazana mirabilis mirabilis & Distantalna splendida… and some lanternflies:
Cicadas. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada of Madagascar:
Cicadas. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

A stick sculpture:
A hut. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Lake Count Forest Preserves Cicada Mania! Festival, part 1

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 4:52 pm

Here’s some photos from the Cicada Mania! Festival at the Lake Count Forest Preserves at Ryerson Woods back in 2008 for the Brood XIII Magicicada emergence.

Skip to Part 2, Part 3, or Part 4.

The Cicada Mobile:
Cicada Mobile. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada Mobile. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada Mobile. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada Mobile. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

A metal cicada sculpture:
Cicada sculpture. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada Sculpture. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada specimen displays:
Cicada specimens. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada specimens. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

A display demonstrating the lifecycle of periodical cicadas:
Cicada Lifecycle. Lake Count Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

March 8, 2020

Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto

Filed under: Brood XIII | Eye Color | Magicicada — Tags: — Dan @ 10:04 am

Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto, from 2007. Photos were taken in North Riverside, Illinois.

Magicicada nymph climbing on a tree branch:
Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto, from 2007. Photos were taken in North Riverside, Illinois.

Magicicada septendecim (Pharaoh cicada):
Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto, from 2007. Photos were taken in North Riverside, Illinois.

Two Magicicada, one with blue eyes:
Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto, from 2007. Photos were taken in North Riverside, Illinois.

Magicicada stuck in its nymphal skin

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Molting — Dan @ 8:47 am

Occasionally cicadas get stuck in their nymphal skins (exuvia) during the molting process (ecdysis). The reasons why might be external forces like temperature, rain, wind, interference by other cicadas or other insects like ants, or something wrong with the cicada itself.

This is a photo sent to us by Liz G back in 2007 during Brood XIII from Peoria, Illinois.

Liz G Brood XIII

Brood XIII cicadas by James P

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada — Dan @ 7:44 am

A funny photo from James P. from Glenview, IL. 2007. Recently emerged Brood XIII Magicicada cicadas sharing a branch. Magicicada adults are white when they molt, but turn black as their bodies harden (sclerotize).

Brood XIII Magicicada cicadas by James P. A funny photo from James P. from Glenview, IL. 2007.

Brood XIII Magicicada cicadas by James P. A funny photo from James P. from Glenview, IL. 2007.

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