Cicada Mania

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March 22, 2020

Lake County Forest Preserves Cicada Mania! Festival, part 4

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Tags: , — Dan @ 5:19 pm

Here are some photos from the Cicada Mania! Festival at the Lake County Forest Preserves at Ryerson Woods back in 2008 for the Brood XIII Magicicada emergence.

Skip to Part 1, Part 2, or Part 3.

Magicicada cicadas. Most, if now all are Magicicada septendecim:

Cicada on a leg. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada on a hand. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada septendecim.

Updating Magicicada back at my hotel room (giant Alien Ware laptop):
Updating cicadamania.com

Lake County Forest Preserves Cicada Mania! Festival, part 3

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Tags: — Dan @ 5:13 pm

Here are some photos from the Cicada Mania! Festival at the Lake County Forest Preserves at Ryerson Woods back in 2008 for the Brood XIII Magicicada emergence.

Skip to Part 1, Part 2, or Part 4.

These are photos of Magicicada, most if not all are Magicicada septendecim:

Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

3 Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Many Magicicada. Magicicada. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Lake County Forest Preserves Cicada Mania! Festival, part 2

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Tags: — Dan @ 5:07 pm

Here are some photos from the Cicada Mania! Festival at the Lake County Forest Preserves at Ryerson Woods back in 2008 for the Brood XIII Magicicada emergence.

Skip to Part 1, Part 3, or Part 4.

A photo of Magicicada on a wall:
Cicada photo. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicadas around the world plaque:
 Card. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Pomponia imperator:
Pomponia. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicadas of Australia:
Cicadas of Australia. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Salvazana mirabilis mirabilis & Distantalna splendida… and some lanternflies:
Cicadas. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada of Madagascar:
Cicadas. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

A stick sculpture:
A hut. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Lake County Forest Preserves Cicada Mania! Festival, part 1

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Tags: — Dan @ 4:52 pm

Here are some photos from the Cicada Mania! Festival at the Lake County Forest Preserves at Ryerson Woods back in 2008 for the Brood XIII Magicicada emergence.

Skip to Part 2, Part 3, or Part 4.

The Cicada Mobile:
Cicada Mobile. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada Mobile. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada Mobile. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada Mobile. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

A metal cicada sculpture:
Cicada sculpture. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada Sculpture. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada specimen displays:
Cicada specimens. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

Cicada specimens. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

A display demonstrating the lifecycle of periodical cicadas:
Cicada Lifecycle. Lake County Forest Preserve outside of Chicago. Brood XIII. 2007.

March 8, 2020

Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto

Filed under: Brood XIII | Eye Color | Magicicada — Tags: — Dan @ 10:04 am

Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto, from 2007. Photos were taken in North Riverside, Illinois.

Magicicada nymph climbing on a tree branch:
Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto, from 2007. Photos were taken in North Riverside, Illinois.

Magicicada septendecim (Pharaoh cicada):
Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto, from 2007. Photos were taken in North Riverside, Illinois.

Two Magicicada, one with blue eyes:
Brood XIII cicada photos by Mark Muto, from 2007. Photos were taken in North Riverside, Illinois.

Magicicada stuck in its nymphal skin

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Molting — Dan @ 8:47 am

Occasionally cicadas get stuck in their nymphal skins (exuvia) during the molting process (ecdysis). The reasons why might be external forces like temperature, rain, wind, interference by other cicadas or other insects like ants, or something wrong with the cicada itself.

This is a photo sent to us by Liz G back in 2007 during Brood XIII from Peoria, Illinois.

Liz G Brood XIII

Brood XIII cicadas by James P

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada — Dan @ 7:44 am

A funny photo from James P. from Glenview, IL. 2007. Recently emerged Brood XIII Magicicada cicadas sharing a branch. Magicicada adults are white when they molt, but turn black as their bodies harden (sclerotize).

Brood XIII Magicicada cicadas by James P. A funny photo from James P. from Glenview, IL. 2007.

Brood XIII Magicicada cicadas by James P. A funny photo from James P. from Glenview, IL. 2007.

March 1, 2020

Seagulls and cicadas photo by Sue

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada — Dan @ 8:47 am

These images go back to 2007 (Brood XIII).

Sue had noticed that seagulls had taken a liking (maybe an obsession) to cicadas. Look at all those seagulls ready to swoop down (or up) and grab a cicada:

Seagulls waiting to eat cicadas

No seagulls in this photo, just exuvia on a tree:
Magicicada on a tree

I live near the ocean and can testify that seagulls are bold and voracious eaters. They pose a threat to not just cicadas, but also seals and even Jedi:

April 2, 2013

The most interesting 17 year cicada facts

Brood XIII (17-year) and Brood XIX (13-year) are emerging in 2024! The last time these broods co-emerged was 1803.

These are the 17 most interesting 17-year cicada facts (IMHO). All these facts apply to 13-year cicadas as well.

#1. Names for cicadas

People call these cicadas “locusts” but they are not true locusts — real locusts look like grasshoppers. The phrase “17-year cicada” indicates that they arrive every 17 years. The name “periodical cicadas” indicates that they arrive periodically and not each and every year. The scientific name for the Genus of these cicadas is Magicicada, and there are 3 types of 17 year Magicicadas: Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini and Magicicada septendecula.

This is a true locust:
Locust

#2. There are 13-year cicadas too

There are 13-year cicadas too! There are four species of 13-year cicadas: Magicicada tredecim, Magicicada neotredecim, Magicicada tredecassini, and Magicicada tredecula. Broods XIX, XXII and XXIII feature these cicadas.

Here’s a video that will help you identify the various species.

#3. Many Eye Colors

Most 17-Year Cicadas have red eyes, but they can also have white, gray, blue , or multi-colored eyes.

Yellow-White Eyed Male Magicicada septendecim Metuchen NJ

#4. Fungus

The Massospora cicadina fungus infects Magicicadas, destroying their abdomen and ability to reproduce. Often, their entire abdomen will fall off. The cicadas spread the fungus throughout their local colony via mating. The Massospora fungus is a cicada STD!

Male Magicicada septendecim infected with Massospora cicadina fungus

#5. They will land on you if you are using a power tool or lawn mower

Cicadas think the sounds made by power tools and lawn maintenance equipment are made by cicadas. They get confused and will land on the people using the equipment! Pro-tip: cut your lawn in the early morning or near dusk when the cicadas are less active.

guy with cicadas

#6. Cicadas have five eyes

Cicadas have two, obvious, large, compound eyes, and three ocelli. Ocelli are three jewel-like eyes situated between the two main, compound eyes of a cicada. We believe ocelli are used to detect light and darkness. Ocelli means little eyes in Latin.

5 Eyes

#7. People eat them

People eat them. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, sauté it. There, uh, cicada kabobs, cicada creole, cicada gumbo, panfried, deep fried, stir fried. There’s pineapple cicada, lemon cicada, coconut cicada, pepper cicada, cicada soup, cicada stew, cicada salad, cicada and potatoes, cicada burger, cicada pizza, cicada sandwich… that’s, that’s about it.

Cicada Ice Cream

#8. Animals eat them

All wild animals and domestic pets will eat them. Dogs will gorge themselves until they choke. Squirrels will eat them like corn on the cob. Wild turkeys will grow fat and juicy on the cicada feast. Fish go crazy for them too — you can use them as bait, or use lures that mimic them.

#9. Cicadas “eat” tree fluids

Cicadas don’t eat solid foods like leaves or fruits. Instead they use their slender, straw-like mouth parts to drink tree fluids.

#10. Cicadas pee

Yes cicadas pee, so wear a hat when walking under trees if that sort of thing bothers you. Cicadas drink tree fluids and then expel the excess fluid they do now need. People call it “honeydew” or “cicada rain”.

#11. How cicadas make their sound

Only male cicadas make the loud sound they are famous for. Males have organs on their abdomen called tymbals. Muscles pop the tymbals in and out, which creates the sound we hear. Males make different calls for different reasons, and each species has a unique sound. Females can make sound too: they flick their wings to respond to males.

tymbals

#12. There are billions of them

There are literally billions, if not trillions, of 17-year cicadas. Why? One theory suggests that a large number of cicadas overwhelms predators, so predators are never able to eat them all and cicadas, and many always survive to mate. This is a survival strategy called “predator satiation”.

#13. They damage wimpy trees

The biggest concern about 17-year cicadas is their potential to damage young trees. The truth is they will damage limbs on the wimpiest of trees, so if you have weak, pathetic, wimpy ornamental trees in your yard you should consider placing netting around the trees if the cicadas visit your yard. Also, you can try hosing them off with water, placing insect barrier tape around the trunk of the trees, or picking them off like grapes! Or, plant strong, beefy American trees — that’s what I would do. Cicadas actually benefit the health of trees by aerating the soil around the roots and trimming the weak or damaged limbs.

#14. Stragglers

Periodical cicadas that emerge in years before they are supposed to emerge are called stragglers.

hipster cicada

#15. 17 and 13 are prime numbers

Scientist speculate that one reason why these cicadas emerge in 17 or 13 year cycles is because those are prime numbers. The fact that 13 & 17 are relatively large* prime numbers makes it difficult for predators to synchronize with them. (*Relative to the average lifespan of an animal.) Annual cicadas (cicadas that arrive every year) often have wasps specialized to prey on them; periodical cicadas have no such wasp because no wasp could evolve to synch with it.

#16. They use their color to warm up

Cicadas need to be warm to sing and fly around. Their dark skin absorbs the heat of the sun, which helps to warm them up.

#17. 17-year and 13-year broods co-emerge every 221 years

Cicada Broods usually don’t overlap geographically, and it is very rare when they emerge in the same year. In 2024, Brood XIX and Brood XIII are both emerging.

###

If you have 18 minutes to spare, watch the video version of this article.

December 31, 2007

2007 Archive of Annual Cicada Sightings

Filed under: Annual | Brood XIII | Mail, Comments & Social — Dan @ 1:01 am

Although this post compiles Annual cicada sightings from 2007, is some Magicicada Brood XIII talk in the July-May comments. Comments are in reverse order.

I also live in an area of Australia where cicadas are hatching in droves. We’ve pulled dozens of casings off of the house alone, and today — so far- nearly a dozen have hatched. I’m rescuing lots off of my truck tyres. We have a rare type here, called the Orange Drummer. I’ve posted some pics on Flickr:

1_hatching_sm1

Comment by Jodi C. — November 26, 2007 [AT] 9:09 pm

Hi, I live in cicada heaven, which is in the Blue Mountains,west of Sydent in NSW Australia. Cicadas are found of all types and species. Any day in summer you can hear a chorus of cicadas which have been measured at over 150 decibels. You can literally walk up to any tree and pick them up off the trunk! Birds just fly up and eat them in front of you, but there are still cicada nymphs emerging in bright daylight (normally this only happens at night!) I think it has something to do with the unseasonally wet and cold weather we have been experiencing this summer. But anyway, I have loads of pics if you want to contact me: kevin [AT] padrepio.org.au
Blessings!

Comment by Fr Kevin Lee — November 15, 2007 [AT] 11:10 pm

It’s October. It has reached 92 degrees today (Aurora, Illinois) and I heard many, many cicadas.

A few days ago I also heard one in Naperville, Illinois.

I was actually surprised. But, I would understand since it is awfully warm out.

Comment by Daniela Barrios — October 7, 2007 [AT] 4:52 pm

A photo of a Masked Devil cicada that flew into my living room last night (in the Blue Mountains, New South Wales):
http://www.facebook.com/ph​oto.php?pid=341705&l=b46a1​&id=715264364

A shell I found a week ago:
http://www.facebook.com/ph​oto.php?pid=326996&l=2efbd​&id=715264364

Cheers!

Comment by Andrew Sweeney — October 3, 2007 [AT] 10:25 pm

Dan posted some of my videos of a singing cicada in Sacramento, CA recently. I also took still pictures of the cicada while shooting the video. Here are the links to the still shots:
http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicada6originalsizepic.jpg

http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicada2rightside.jpg

http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicada5originalsizepic.jpg

http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicada1originalsizepic.jpg

All I know is that it is some species of Okanagana.

Comment by Phoebe — September 14, 2007 [AT] 2:31 pm

I am not in anyway an expert ha ha , when it comes to cicatas , but from the pictures I have looked up I beleave I have found a common every year cicata its still emerging frome his exoskeliton ,I found him lieing on the ground on a sidewalk I knew he had fallin off of his resting spot and I knew if i left him their hed get step on or torchered by a human or something els so I plased him om my balcony and im worried he isnt emerging like normal , he is half way out and just stoped , I guess what Im trying to find out is how long would it normaly take the tibian cicada to leave the exoskelito ? hours , days ? or is it suposed to take a wile ,,, he obviously isnt in mutch ah hurry to go …. some one please help me understand this prosses better id be most gratfull to learn

Comment by edith — August 31, 2007 [AT] 12:05 am

I live just outside Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, and recently found a beetle that I’ve never seen in this area — someone suggested it might be a cicada. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to snap a picture, but haven’t seen any on your site that look like this. Do cicadas live in this area, and if so, would they feed from a Mountain Ash tree? My mountain ash trees seem to have some disease or pest they’ve never had before, and these bugs are also new.

Comment by Michelle — August 28, 2007 [AT] 1:46 pm

I live in Sacramento, CA. I have seen cicadas in trees several times in the past week, and I hear them all over the place. I took a few videos of them. You can see the best one here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ey5nMtPBjNs

I have several other videos, but YouTube’s search function hasn’t been working properly since July 25. When you search by “Date Added”, hardly any newer videos show up, including all my latest cicada sightings.

I also took a still picture of the cicada featured in my video link: http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicadainSacramentoCA7-25-07.jpg

Comment by Phoebe — July 30, 2007 [AT] 3:21 pm

Heard a strange noise. looked on the front screen. Found an incredibly strange insect I had never seen before. Finally figured out it was a cicada. We are in Northeast PA, and I think these are the 17-year deals. Crazy.

Comment by Eric — July 25, 2007 [AT] 7:14 pm

Hi guys,
I’m in Albuquerque for a conference, and last night around 8:30 heard what sounded like cicadas in a tree…where I grew up (Delaware) cicadas only call on hot afternoons. Was I really hearing cicadas? Or some other critter?
Thanks…

Comment by Melissa — July 20, 2007 [AT] 5:51 am

Hi Lindsey,
Those sound rather neat. If you can get a picture, post on this website and that could help identification

Comment by david — July 14, 2007 [AT] 4:09 pm

We live in Krum, Texas (near the Dallas/Fort Worth area) and for the past two years I have noticed some very tiny cicadas which come up from under our shrubs to sit on the porch screens. They are a mottled grey camouflage color, and measure only about 3/4 inch! They can almost be mistaken for horseflies. They do “buzz” like other cicadas if startled off the porch screen, but I don’t know what their particular song is like. I would like to know what they are, if anyone can tell me.

Comment by Lindsey Williams — July 14, 2007 [AT] 9:40 am

Hello all,

It has become very warm here in New York. For some reason the Tibicens are taking a while to come up. Possibly the unusually cool days may have delayed the emergence. I heard a Tibicen chloromera finally sing this AM. Caught an emerging nymph the night before, but none last night. The teneral adult is living amongst oak branches I have provided it and I am waiting for it to mature. Interested in seeing how long one could be kept in captivity (my record was 12 days for a periodical species) and if they would sing as well. (Had a septendecim that sang, the cassini did not). No T.lyricen heard as of yet. If anyone knows of any other species that inhabit the NY area let me know (Queens County and Long Island)

Comment by Elias — July 10, 2007 [AT] 7:49 am

Hello Dan,

Just recently purchased 25 cicadas rom Illinois. Unfortunatley due to the intervening Holiday (7/4), all dies except one. She is a septendecim female and still lives to today! I never knew periodicals could be found in July!! Here in Nassau county yesterday I heard a Tibicen Canicularis dsing at dusk and this morning in QUeens a Tibicen chlomera sang as well. Found an emerging nymph yesterday and placed him with the Magicada. Never thought I would see these two species side by side!!! Its been a great year for cicadas. Now its time for the Tibicens to take over.

Comment by Elias — July 9, 2007 [AT] 8:38 am

Amanda: if it’s a Tibicen cicada, then it’s perfectly normal. Tibicens emerge every year.

Comment by Dan Mozgai — July 3, 2007 [AT] 7:00 am

Apparantly one cicada is confused. We aren’t supposed to have a brood here within a couple of states this year, yet we found one hanging out with the June Bugs tonight. We are just outside Memphis, TN in North Mississippi. Not sure what’s up with that? TN is supposed to have a brood next year, maybe he came up a little early?

Comment by Amanda — July 2, 2007 [AT] 8:47 pm

Here in south Oak Park, Illinois, we just heard our first Annual Cicada, a Tibicen pruinosa singing about 45 minutes before sunset. Last year we heard our first T. pruinosa on June 27, although for several years before that we did not heard them until early July. We have been feeling seriously deprived of Periodical Cicadas in our neighborhood. We have to drive a few miles west, to the Des Plaines River floodplain, to see them in large numbers. At least we seem to be a bit ahead of the game with the Annual Cicadas!
Eric, Ethan, and Aaron Gyllenhaal
Kid’s Cicada Hunt

Comment by Eric Gyllenhaal — June 26, 2007 [AT] 6:12 pm

have there been cicada sightings in elkhorn Wisconsin? i’ll be there for a week and want to know how to prepare.

Comment by Peri — June 16, 2007 [AT] 7:37 pm

Interesting, I haven’t seen or heard(thank God) the little critters, but my man was driving to Tinley Park and while in traffic had the radio up quite a bit. He heards this high pitched sound, turned the radio off rolled the woindow down and he said it was like an invasion of millions of crickets. I laughed because 2 weeks before that I told him :The Cicadas are coming…” lol

Comment by Laurie and Mike — June 15, 2007 [AT] 10:44 pm

There’s plenty of cicadas in California, but they’re annual cicadas — they type that emerge every year in small numbers.

Comment by Dan — June 13, 2007 [AT] 4:46 pm

I don’t know what to make of it… this week, here in Santa Barbara, CA, I’ve heard that lovely, shrill singing of the cicadas. Not many of them & haven’t seen any, but I can hear them up in some trees. I travelled extensively through the South and lower Great Lakes in the summer of 2004, so I’m more than familiar with that distinctive sound. I wasn’t aware they lived in southern California, especially right on the coast like this… never have heard them before. Fluke of global warming or something? 🙂

Comment by C. Campbell — June 13, 2007 [AT] 4:42 pm

Over Memorial Day weekend we were at Railroad Park Campground, near Castle Crags, just south of Dunsmuir, California. We saw dozens of cicadas molting out of their nymph stage. They were mostly on the site marker posts for the campsites, but were also found on camp chairs, picnic tables and bicycle tires! I got a ton of photos of the emergence of the adults and the expansion and drying of the wings. I would gladly forward photos to someone who could identify the variety.

Comment by Rusty McMillan — June 11, 2007 [AT] 5:35 pm

P.S. SORRY, I LIVE IN CRYSTAL LAKE ILLINOIS.
LAURIE STEWART AGAIN!

Comment by LAURIE L. STEWART — June 11, 2007 [AT] 12:52 pm

HELP!!! I’M JUST TRYING TO FIND A MAP SHOWING WHERE THE CICADAS ARE. I WANT SO TO SEE THE MIRACLE OF THEM IN PROGRESS. I MAY NOT BE HERE IN 17 MORE YEARS. I FIND IT QUITE A SPIRITUAL EVENT.

THANK YOU SO MUCH,

LAURIE STEWART

Comment by LAURIE L. STEWART — June 11, 2007 [AT] 12:51 pm

Timberon, NM — After a brief email conversation with someone from this site, and sending him a photo of one of our local cicadas, it has been determined that the cicadas in the mountains of South Centeral New Mexico are Platapedia. Perhaps the ones in Santa Fe are of the same Genus.

Comment by Scott M. — June 10, 2007 [AT] 5:26 pm

I live in the suburbs around chicago and there were so many cicadas on one of my plants that it became smothered… I CAN’T WAIT FOR THESE GROSS BUGS TO GO BYE-BYE!!!!

Comment by Plant Luver — June 3, 2007 [AT] 11:44 am

I live just outside of Santa Fe, New Mexico and about a week and a half ago i was taking a walk in the woods and i noticed holes about an inch in diameter all over the place. I then noticed that they were housing some sort of beetle, but i didn’t know what kind. Well about three days ago i went outside and heard the forest alive with that unmistakable cicada song. The trees were crawling with them. I’ve never seen them this far west before and am wondering what kind they are?

Comment by Antonio mora — June 3, 2007 [AT] 11:16 am

I found thousands of cicadas up and down Chickaloon Drive in McHenry, Illinois. Some are up in the trees, under the trees leaves, and more are hatching as I write!! IT was fantastic and the niose was deafening!

Comment by Kathryn — May 30, 2007 [AT] 5:46 pm

I was camping in the Catskill Mountains of NY State (specifcally at Mongaup Pond in Livingston Manor)this Memorial Day weekend and cicada exoskeletons were all around. I heard they were Chicago area and was surprised to find them. We also had balck flies!!

Comment by Sonya — May 29, 2007 [AT] 8:24 am

My name is Kailey. I am 10 years old and live in Indiana. I just went outside in my backyard and counted 244 cicada moltings. And some live ones too.

Comment by Kailey — May 24, 2007 [AT] 8:49 am

Lake Forest, IL….First Cicada sighting Brood XIII at garden-goddess.blogspot.com

Comment by Carole Brewer — May 14, 2007 [AT] 7:18 am

We have an outdoor wedding planned in Lemont on June 16th. If the cicada’s emerge on May 22nd, what are we in for as far as “uninvited guests” to our wedding.

Comment by tryingtokeepasenseof humor — May 6, 2007 [AT] 10:53 am

Hello everyone. Long time, no see… Just wanted to share sometime indirectly cicada related that you may find of interest. I’m sure if anyone is a gamer, then you’re familiar with one of the most popular games currently on sale. Check out the “GEARS OF WAR” for the Xbox 360. You’ll learn of the big “Emergence Day” event within the game’s storyline. The enemy you’ll be fighting are called “Locusts” that actually come from the bowels of the earth! However, you’ll soon discover that these “Locusts” are not the little critters we know and love. Check it out. You may find if amusing like I did. Plus it is also a really fun game!!!
Check out http://www.gearsofwar.com

Comment by Les Daniels — January 5, 2007 [AT] 3:00 pm

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