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December 7, 2018

Terpnosia psecas (Walker, 1850)

Terpnosia psecas (Walker, 1850) is a cicada found in India, Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and Java (Indonesia).

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cicadini
SubTribe: Psithyristriina [Psithyr means “whispering” in Greek]
Genera: Terpnosia
Species: Terpnosia psecas (Walker, 1850)

Terpnosia psecas (Walker, 1850)

Terpnosia genus description by W. L. Distant:

Characters. — Head about as long as breadth between eyes, deflected anteriorly, front not prominent; pronotum distinctly shorter than mesonotum, its lateral margins sinuate, with the posterior angles moderately lobalety produced; abdomen in male longer than space between apex of head and base of cruciform elevation; tympanal coverings both narrower and shorter than tympanal cavities; opercula in male short and transverse, usually not or scarcely extending beyond base of abdomen; anterior femora spined beneath; tegmina and wings hyaline, the first usually more or less maculate, with eight apical areas, and the basal cell longer than broad; wings with six apical areas.

References:

  1. The illustration and description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1914 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Gaeaninae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name verification comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

December 6, 2018

Lethama locusta (Walker, 1850)

Lethama locusta (Walker, 1850) is a cicada found in India.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Dundubiini
SubTribe: Cosmopsaltriaria
Genera: Lethama
Species: Lethama locusta (Walker, 1850)

Lethama  locusta (Walker, 1850)

Lethama genus description by W. L. Distant in Genera Insectorum, 1914:

Characters – lead horizontal, As long as space between eyes, not anteriorly deflected, front very prominent, margins of front and ver/ex obliquely sub-continuous; pronotum as long as mesonotum, its lateral margins oblique, sinuate, obscurely dentate; abdomen considerably longer than space between apex of head and base of cruciform elevation; tympana imperfectly covered, the flaps shorter and narrower than the tympanal cavities; rostrum about reaching the posterior coxae; anterior femora armed beneath with two or three strong spines; opercula extending to more than half the length of the abdomen, sinuate, wide apart and on the lateral abdominal areas; tegmina broad, their greatest breadth more than one-third of their length, apical areas eight, basal cell much longer than broad.

References:

  1. The illustration and description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1914 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Gaeaninae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name verification comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

December 1, 2018

Hyalessa mahoni (Distant, 1906)

Hyalessa mahoni (Distant, 1906) is a cicada found in India.

Its name changed from Oncotympana mahoni to Hyalessa mahoni, when it was moved to the Hyalessa China, 1925 genus. The Oncotympana Stål, 1870 genus still exists. Interestingly, the Hyalessa genus belongs to the Sonatini tribe and Oncotympana belongs to Cicadini.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Sonatini
Genera: Hyalessa
Species: Hyalessa mahoni (Distant, 1906)

Hyalessa mahoni (Distant, 1906)
The image says Hyalessa mahoni, but the newest name for this cicada is Oncotympana mahoni.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Current species name verified using Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

November 27, 2018

Leptopsaltria tuberosa (Signoret, 1847)

Leptopsaltria tuberosa (Signoret, 1847) is a cicada found in India, Japan, and on Java (Indonesia), according the the Genera Insectorum, 1913. That’s quite a range.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cicadini
SubTribe: Leptopsaltriina
Genera: Leptopsaltria
Species: Leptopsaltria tuberosa (Signoret, 1847)

Leptopsaltria tuberosa (Signoret, 1847)

Leptopsaltria genus description by W. L. Distant in Genera Insectorum, 1913:

Characters. — Head (including eyes), considerably narrower than base of mesonotum, ocelli not quite twice the distance from eyes as from each other, front somewhat conical and subprominent; pronotum with the lateral margins moderately ampliated and more or less distinctly toothed or angulated; genae internally at apex near base of lorae furnished with a tubercle or tumescence; abdomen moderately long and robust; anterior femora distinctly and robustly spined; rostrum extending beyond the posterior coxae; tympana covered; opercula short; second and third abdominal segments in the male furnished with a well-developed tubercle near each lateral margin; tegmina and wings hyaline, venation normal, tegminal apical areas eight in number.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Current species name verified using Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

November 9, 2018

Basa singularis (Walker, 1858)

Basa singularis (Walker, 1858) is a cicada found in India.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cicadini
SubTribe: Psithyristriina
Genera: Basa
Species: Basa singularis (Walker, 1858)

Basa genus description by W. L. Distant:

Characters. — Head with front prominent and produced, its lateral margins at right angles with anterior margins of vertex, its breadth between eyes much narrower than base of mesonotum. its length about equal to that of pronotum; pronotum a little shorter than mesonotum, its lateral margins convex anteriorly and concavely sinuate before posterior angles, which are ampliated; abdomen much longer than space between apex of head and base of cruciform elevation, its lateral areas obliquely depressed above; beneath with the disk somewhat flat and the marginal areas obliquely directed upward; tympanal flaps shorter, but not narrower than tympanal cavities; opercula transverse and just passing base of abdomen; anterior femora strongly spined beneath near apex; anterior tibiae longer than femora, anterior tarsi more than half the length of tibiae; tegmina and wings long and narrow, greatest width of the first only equal to a third of length, its basal cell much longer than broad, fourth ulnar area much compressed at base of third, apical areas eight.

References:

  1. The illustration and description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1914 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Gaeaninae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name verification comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

November 6, 2018

Mata kama (Distant, 1881)

Mata kama (Distant, 1881) is a cicada found in India, Malaysia and likely the lands in-between.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Dundubiini
SubTribe: Dundubiina
Genera: Mata
Species: Mata kama (Distant, 1881)

Mata genus description by W. L. Distant:

Characters. — Head (including eyes) about as wide as base of mesonotum, distinctly shorter than space between eyes; pronotum shorter than mesonotum, its lateral margins a little convex, sinuate before the posterior lateral angles, which are moderately lobately produced ; abdomen in male short, about as long as space between apex of head and base of cruciform elevation ; tympanal orifices completely covered, tympanal coverings with their outer margins sinuate, the posterior angles only projecting beyond the lateral margins of the abdomen; metasternum prolonged in a broad, oblong, laminate process between the opercula, which are short, transverse, and not extending beyond the base of abdomen, their lateral margins visible from above; rostrum reaching the posterior coxae; anterior femora spined beneath; tegmina and wings hyaline, the first maculate; tegmina very long and narrow, more than three times longer than broad, with eight apical areas and the basal cell longer than broad; wings with six apical areas.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Current species name verified using Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

November 5, 2018

Lahugada dohertyi (Distant, 1891)

Lahugada dohertyi (Distant, 1891). This cicada is found in Assam, India.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Lahudadini
Genera: Lahugada
Species: Lahugada dohertyi (Distant, 1891)

Lahugada dohertyi (Distant, 1891)

Lahugada genus description by W. L. Distant:

Characters. — Head (including eyes) considerably narrower than base of mesonotum, its length about equal to space between eyes, its lateral margins discontinuous, the lateral margins of front being almost at right angles to those of vertex; pronotum almost as long as mesonotum, narrowed anteriorly, the posterior angles prominent and rounded; abdomen considerably longer than space between apex of front and base of cruciform elevation; tympana completely covered, tympanal coverings broader than long; opercula short, somewhat globose, wider than abdominal margin, and distinctly visible from above; rostrum about reaching the posterior coxae; tegmina and wings hyaline, the first with eight apical areas and the basal cell longer than broad.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Current species name verified using Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

October 18, 2018

Angamiana floridula Distant, 1904

Angamiana floridula Distant, 1904, is found in the southeastern quadrant of Asia, including China, India, Vietnam, and Thailand.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Polyneurini
SubTribe: Polyneurina
Genera: Angamiana
Species: Angamiana floridula Distant, 1904

Angamiana floridula Distant, 1904

Angamiana genus description by W. L. Distant:

Characters. — Head small, including eyes much narrower than pronotum and narrower than base of mesonotum, ocelli much wider apart from eyes than from each other, front much depressed; pronotum longer than mesonotum, its lateral and posterior margins very broad, the first strongly ampliated and obscurely angulated; abdomen longer than space between apex of head and base of cruciform elevation, above with its lateral areas oblique; tympanal orifices completely covered ; opercula broad, obtusely angulated, not reaching the middle of abdomen; tegmina semihyaline, with the apical third more or less reticulateh^ veined, the apical areas numerous, generali}’ twelve or thirteen in number.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Current species name verified using Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

September 30, 2018

Polyneura ducalis Westwood, 1840

Polyneura ducalis Westwood, 1840, is found in China, Tibet, Indonesia, Burma, Nepal, India, and likely more nations in the region.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Polyneurini
SubTribe: Polyneurina
Genera: Polyneura
Species: Polyneurina ducalis Westwood, 1840

Polyneura ducalis Westwood, 1840

Polyneura genus description by W. L. Distant:

Characters. — Head including eyes about as wide as base of mesonotum, but narrower than pronotum, ocelli further apart from eyes than from each other, front obliquely depressed; pronotum longer than mesonotum, its lateral margins ampliated and medially shortly angulate; abdomen longer than space between apex of head and base of cruciform elevation; tympanal orifices completely covered; opercula short and broad; meso- and metasterna centrality sulcate; tegmina opaque with the venation dense and furcate, reticulate towards apex, all the areas numerous and ill-defined.

References:

  1. The illustration and genus description comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1913 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Cicadinae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information/verification comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

September 28, 2018

Ambragaeana stellata (Walker, 1858)

Once known as Gaeana stellatayes, its name has changedAmbragaeana stellata (Walker, 1858) can be found in China, Thailand, India, and likey other nations the south-eastern part of Asia. Ambragaeana cicadas belong to a group nicknamed the “butterfly cicadas” because of the butterfly-like colors and patterns of their wings.

“Stellata”, I believe, is derived from the Latin word for “star” — it doesn’t take much imagination to see the “stars” in the wings of this cicada.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Gaeanini
SubTribe: Gaeanina
Genera: Ambragaeana
Species: Ambragaeana stellata (Walker, 1858)

Ambragaeana stellata stellata (Walker, 1858)
The image says Gaeana stellata, but the newest name for this cicada is Ambragaeana stellata.

Worth noting: There are two sub-species of Ambragaeana.

References:

  1. The illustration comes from the journal Genera Insectorum, and a specific article from 1914 by W. L. Distant titled Homoptera. Fam. Cicadidae, Subfam, Gaeaninae. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information/verification comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

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