Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

November 10, 2019

Vincent van Gogh’s Three Cicadas

Filed under: Art — Dan @ 7:54 am

People love cicada art possibly more than they love cicadas (my social media posts about cicada art get more views than photos of cicadas).

Here’s Vincent van Gogh’s Three Cicadas. It’s an ink & paper sketch and study. He created it in 1889, in Saint-rémy-de-provence, France. If you want to see it IRL, it’s at the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Vincent van Gogh's Three Cicadas

I’d like to, but I can’t think of something clever to say about the fact that cicadas sing, and van Gogh removed his left ear.

November 9, 2019

Derotettiginae subfamily nov. as a new, monogeneric, fifth cicada subfamily

Filed under: Derotettix — Dan @ 10:27 am

There’s a new cicada subfamily: Derotettiginae.

The five subfamilies are:

  • Derotettiginae (NEW)
  • Tibicininae
  • Tettigomyiinae
  • Cicadettinae
  • Cicadinae

Here’s the paper:

Chris Simon, Eric R L Gordon, M S Moulds, Jeffrey A Cole, Diler Haji, Alan R Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Michelle Kortyna, Katherine Nazario, Elizabeth J Wade, Russell C Meister, Geert Goemans, Stephen M Chiswell, Pablo Pessacq, Claudio Veloso, John P Mccutcheon, Piotr Łukasik, Off-target capture data, endosymbiont genes and morphology reveal a relict lineage that is sister to all other singing cicadas, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, , blz120, https://doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blz120

Here’s the abstract:

Phylogenetic asymmetry is common throughout the tree of life and results from contrasting patterns of speciation and extinction in the paired descendant lineages of ancestral nodes. On the depauperate side of a node, we find extant ‘relict’ taxa that sit atop long, unbranched lineages. Here, we show that a tiny, pale green, inconspicuous and poorly known cicada in the genus Derotettix, endemic to degraded salt-plain habitats in arid regions of central Argentina, is a relict lineage that is sister to all other modern cicadas. Nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenies of cicadas inferred from probe-based genomic hybrid capture data of both target and non-target loci and a morphological cladogram support this hypothesis. We strengthen this conclusion with genomic data from one of the cicada nutritional bacterial endosymbionts, Sulcia, an ancient and obligate endosymbiont of the larger plant-sucking bugs (Auchenorrhyncha) and an important source of maternally inherited phylogenetic data. We establish Derotettiginae subfam. nov. as a new, monogeneric, fifth cicada subfamily, and compile existing and new data on the distribution, ecology and diet of Derotettix. Our consideration of the palaeoenvironmental literature and host-plant phylogenetics allows us to predict what might have led to the relict status of Derotettix over 100 Myr of habitat change in South America.

Tweets from Chris Simon @CicadaScience announcing the new subfamily:

September 22, 2019

Australian Cicada Names 🇦🇺

Filed under: Australia,David Emery,L. W. Popple,Nathan Emery — Dan @ 1:01 am

It’s that time again: time for cicadas in Australia (2019-2020)!

Are you in the Sydney area? Report cicada sightings to The Great Cicada Blitz (Sydney, AUS).

Australia has the best cicada names:

Cyclochila australasiae

When is it out: late Sep-Dec, peaking in November.

Green Grocer

Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by Bron.

Green Grocer

rare green yellow Green Grocer
Photo by Kevin Lee. Yellow-Green Green Grocer with Mask.

Yellow Monday

Tom Katzoulopolopoulous (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by Tom Katzoulopolopoulous.


Blue Moon

Blue Moon (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by David Emery.

Masked Devil

Masked Devil cicada (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by David Emery.


Cherrynose or Whiskey Drinker (Macrotristria angularis)

When is it out: Nov-Feb, peaking in December.

Cherry Nose cicada (Macrotristria angularis)
Photo by David Emery.

Bagpipe Cicada (Lembeja paradoxa)

Lembeja paradoxa
Photo by David Emery.

Floury Baker (Aleeta curvicosta)

Michelle Thompson's Floury Baker (Abricta curvicosta)
Photo by Michelle Thompson.

Golden Emperor (Anapsaltoda pulchra)

Anapsaltoda pulchra (Golden Emperor) from Herberton (Queensland) by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)

When is it out: Nov-Feb, peaking in December.

Double Drummer
Photo by Dan.

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata)

When is it out: January.

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata)
Photo by Jodi.

White Drummer (Arunta perulata)

When is it out: Dec-Jan, peaking in January.

White Drummer cicada (Arunta perulata)
Photo by David Emery.

Bladder Cicada (Cystosoma saundersii)

When is it out: Sep-Jan, peaking in October.

Cystosoma saundersii (bladder cicada)
Photo by David Emery.

Redeye cicada (Psaltoda moerens)

When is it out: Nov-Feb, peaking in December.

Redeye cicada (Psaltoda moerens)
Photo by David Emery.

Click images for larger versions.

More interesting names:

Use this amazing image by David Emery to identify some of the most well-known Australian cicada species:

Aussie cicadas 1 (3)

People and Resources:

2018-2019 Cicada Sightings

I’ll post sightings I hear about on social media here:

  1. January 15, 2019: Black Prince (Psaltoda plaga). Millions of them in Bendalong NSW reported by David Barr via email.
  2. December 31, 2018: Floury Baker (Aleeta curvicosta). Reported by @GB_Wildlyf on Twitter.
  3. December 21, 2018: Marbled Bottle Cicada (Chlorocysta suffusa) . Reported by Lindsay Popple on Twitter.
  4. December 20, 2018: Brown Bunyip (Tamasa tristigma). Reported by Nathan Emery on Twitter.
  5. December 17, 2018: Razor Grinders (Henicopsaltria eydouxii). Reported by EmmaCCroker on Twitter.
  6. December 16, 2018: Black Prince (Psaltoda plaga). Reported by .
  7. December 2, 2018: Red Ringers. Reported by @GB_Wildlyf on Twitter.
  8. November 4, 2018: Southern Mountain Squeaker (Atrapsalta furcilla). Reported by ozzicada on iNaturalist
  9. October 31, 2018: Small Bassian Ambertail (Yoyetta landsboroughi). Reported by ozzicada on iNaturalist.
  10. October 21, 2018: Alarm Clock Squawker (Pauropsalta mneme), Sandstone Squeaker (Atrapsalta corticinus sp. complex) & Fence Buzzer (Myopsalta mackinlayi) . Reported by Nathan Emery on Twitter.
  11. October 16, 2018: Zipping Ambertail (Yoyetta repetens), Ferny Acacia Cicada (Clinopsalta autumna), Southern Red-eyed Squeaker (Popplepsalta notialis) and Southern Bark Squeaker (Atrapsalta corticinus). Reported by Nathan Emery on Twitter.
  12. October 3, 2018: Small Bottle Cicada (Chlorocysta vitripennis). Reported by dianneclarke on iNaturalist.
  13. September 28, 2018: Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae). Reported by EmmaCCroker on Twitter.
  14. September 19, 2018: Alarm Clock Squawker (Pauropsalta mneme). Reported by njemery on iNaturalist.
  15. September 11, 2018: Silver Princess (Yoyetta celis). Reported by @christiewithaC on Twitter
  16. September 11, 2018: Bladder Cicada (Cystosoma saundersii). Reported by joelp on iNaturalist

2017-2018 reports of cicadas as I see them on social media

This might be handy for guessing when cicada species in Australia will emerge.

September 21, 2019

Cicada Papers Published in 2019

Filed under: Papers and Documents — Dan @ 5:00 am

This is a running list of papers or documents published about cicadas in the year 2019. 35 so far (as of November).

If I missed an article, email me at cicadamania@gmail.com.

October

  1. A revision of the Yoyetta abdominalis (Distant) species group of cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae), introducing eight new species. Authors: David Emery, Nathan Emery, Lindsay Popple. Link to Journals Australia Museum.
  2. Off-target capture data, endosymbiont genes and morphology reveal a relict lineage that is sister to all other singing cicadas. Authors: Chris Simon, Eric R L Gordon, M S Moulds, Jeffrey A Cole, Diler Haji, Alan R Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Michelle Kortyna, Katherine Nazario, Elizabeth J Wade, Russell C Meister, Geert Goemans, Stephen M Chiswell, Pablo Pessacq, Claudio Veloso, John P Mccutcheon, Piotr Łukasik. Link to Biological Journal of the Linnean Society.
  3. Noisy neighbours among the selfish herd: a critical song distance mediates mate recognition within cicada emergences (Hemiptera: Cicadidae). Authors: Will Chatfield-Taylor, Jeffrey A Cole. Link to Biological Journal of the Linnean Society.
  4. Genital coupling, morphology and evolution of male holding structures in Cicadinae (Hemiptera: Cicadidae). Authors: Tatiana Petersen Ruschel, Filipe Michels Bianchi, Luiz Alexandre Campos. Link to Biological Journal of the Linnean Society.
  5. Psychoactive plant- and mushroom-associated alkaloids from two behavior modifying cicada pathogens. Authors: Greg R. Boyce, Emile Gluck-Thaler, Jason C. Slot, Jason E. Stajich, William J. Davis, Tim Y.James, John R. Cooley, Daniel G. Panaccione, Jørgen Eilenberg, Henrik H. De Fine Licht, Angie M. Macias, Matthew C. Berger, Kristen L. Wickert, Cameron M. Stauder, Ellie J. Spahr, Matthew D. Maust, Amy M. Metheny, Chris Simon, Gene Kritsky, Kathie T. Hodge, Richard A.Humber, Terry Gullion, Dylan P.G. Short, Teiya Kijimoto, Dan Mozgai, Nidia Arguedas, Matt T. Kasson. Link to sciencedirect.com

September

  1. A note on the taxonomy and natural history of the Summer Clicker Lahugada dohertyi (Distant, 1891) (Insecta: Hemiptera: Cicadidae) along with its distribution in northern West Bengal, India. Authors: Vivek Sarkar. Like to the Journal of Threatened Taxa.
  2. Gold coated Cicada wings: Anti-reflective micro-environment for plasmonic enhancement of fluorescence from upconversion nanoparticles. Authors: Akash Gupta, Hao-Yu Cheng, Kung-Hsuan Lin, Chien Ting Wu, Pradip Kumar Roy, Sandip Ghosh, Surojit Chattopadhyay. Link to Science Direct.
  3. A new species and first record of the cicada genus Sinotympana Lee, 2009 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Dundubiini) from Vietnam. Authors: THAI-HONG PHAM, ALLEN F. SANBORN, HUYEN-THI NGUYEN, JEROME CONSTANT. Link to Zootaxa.

August

  1. A New Species of Calopsaltria Stål, 1861 (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae: Parnisini) from South Africa. Author: Allen F. Sanborn. Link to paper.
  2. The cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of Bolivia including the descriptions of fifteen new species, the resurrection of one genus and two species, seven new combinations, six new synonymies, and twenty-eight new records. Author: ALLEN F. SANBORN. Link to Zootaxa.

July

  1. Periodical cicada emergence resource pulse tracks forest expansion in a tallgrass prairie landscape. Authors: Matt R. Whiles, Bruce A. Snyder, Brent L. Brock, Sophia Bonjour, Mac A. Callaham Jr., Clinton K. Meyer, Alex Bell. Link to Ecosphere journal.

June

  1. The cicada genus Selymbria Stå1, 1861 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Tibicininae: Selymbrini): redescription including ten new species and a key to the genus. Author: Allen F Sanborn. Link to Zootaxa.
  2. Cicada Endosymbionts Have tRNAs That Are Correctly Processed Despite Having Genomes That Do Not Encode All of the tRNA Processing Machinery. Authors: James T. Van Leuven, Meng Mao, Denghui D. Xing, Gordon M. Bennett, John P. McCutcheon. Link to mBio
  3. An enigmatic fossil hairy cicada (Hemiptera, Tettigarctidae) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. Authors: Hui Jiang, Jun Chen, Ed Jarzembowski, Bo Wang. Link to article
  4. Comparative sialotranscriptome analysis of the rare Chinese cicada Subpsaltria yangi, with identification of candidate genes related to host-plant adaptation. Authors: Yunxiang Liu, Mengmeng Qi, Christopher H. Dietrich, Zhiqiang He, Cong Wei. Link to article

May

  1. First record of the cicadas genus Orientopsaltria Kato, 1944 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) from Vietnam, with description of one new species. Authors: Thai-Hong Pham, Thi Huyen Nguyen, Jerome Constant. Link to Zootaxa

April

  1. The applications of biomimetic cicada-wing structure on the organic light-emitting diodes. Authors: Chih-Kai Nien, Hsin Her Yu. Link to Science Direct.
  2. Oxygen/phosphorus co-doped porous carbon from cicada slough as high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. Authors: Bingwei Chen, Wenzhuo Wu, Chunyang Li, Yanfang Wang, Yi Zhang, Lijun Fu, Yusong Zhu, Lixin Zhang & Yuping Wu. Link to Nature.
  3. The winner takes it all: how semelparous insects can become periodical. Authors: Odo Diekmann, Robert Planqué. Link to springer.com.
  4. A new species of larval Caeculisoma (Acari: Erythraeidae) parasitic on cicadas from China with detailed comparison of all larval members in the genus. Authors: Si-Yuan Xu, Tian-Ci Yi, Jian-Jun Guo, and Dao-Chao Jin. Link to bioone.org
  5. Characterization of polymorphic loci for two cicada species: Cryptotympana atrata and Hyalessa fuscata (Hemiptera: Cicadoidae). Author(s): Hoa Quynh Nguyen,Soyeon Chae, Erick Kim, Yikweon Jang. Link to paper.

March

  1. New Host Records and Biological Notes for Diceroprocta bulgara (Distant) in Mexico. Authors: José Antonio Sánchez-García , José Joaquín Velázquez-Monreal , Héctor Miguel Guzmán-Vásquez , Roselia Jarquín-López , Jesús Alberto Ortíz-López , Miguel Ángel Manzanilla-Ramírez , Manuel Ovando-Cruz , Teodulfo Aquino-Bolaños , Allen F. Sanborn. Link to paper.
  2. Cicada slough-derived heteroatom incorporated porous carbon for supercapacitor: Ultra-high gravimetric capacitance. Authors: Haiyang Jia, Jiawei Sun, Xiao Xie, Kuibo Yin, Litao Sun. Link to articles.
  3. Evolutionary hysteresis and ratchets in the evolution of periodical cicadas. Author(s): Jaakko Toivonen and Lutz Fromhage. Link to paper.
  4. The effects of pulsed fertilization and chronic herbivory by periodical cicadas on tree growth. Author(s): Louie H. Yang, Richard Karban. Link to paper.
  5. Mitochondrial Genomics Reveals Shared Phylogeographic Patterns and Demographic History among Three Periodical Cicada Species Groups. Author(s): Zhenyong Du, Hiroki Hasegawa, John R Cooley, Chris Simon, Jin Yoshimura, Wanzhi Cai, Teiji Sota, Hu Li. Link to paper.
  6. Homoptera – Cicadas and Hoppers. Author(s): Ying Wang, Xiao Zhang, Tingying Zhang, Xue Liu, Chungkun Shih, Yunzhi Yao, Dong Ren. Link to paper.
  7. Mesodiphthera Tillyard, 1919, from the Late Triassic of Queensland, the oldest cicada (Hemiptera: Cicadomorpha: Cicadoidea: Tettigarctidae). Author(s): KEVIN J. LAMBKIN. Link to paper.
  8. Out of Africa? A dated molecular phylogeny of the cicada tribe Platypleurini Schmidt (Hemiptera: Cicadidae), with a focus on African genera and the genus Platypleura Amyot & Audinet‐Serville. Author(s): Benjamin W. Price, David C. Marshall, Nigel P. Barker, Chris Simon, Martin H. Villet. Link to paper.
  9. Ecophysiological responses to climate change in cicadas. Author(s): Minoru Moriyama , Hideharu Numata. Link to paper.

February

  1. Intra- and Interspecific Prey Theft in Cicada Killers (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Sphecius) . Author(s): J R Coelho, C W Holliday, J M Hastings. Link to paper.

January

  1. Phylogeny and biogeography of the leaf-winged cicadas (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae). Author(s): Tatiana Petersen Ruschel, Luiz Alexandre Campos. Link to paper.
  2. A Simple Model of Periodic Reproduction: Selection of Prime Periods. Author(s): Raul Abreu de Assis, Mazílio Coronel Malavazi. Link to paper.
  3. First hairy cicadas in mid-Cretaceous amber from northern Myanmar (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea: Tettigarctidae). Author(s): Yanzhe Fu, Chenyang Cai, Diying Huang. Link to paper.
  4. Investigation of nanostructure-based bactericidal effect derived from a cicada wing by using QCM-D. Authors: Keisuke Jindai, Kazuki Nakadea, Takashi Sagawa, Hiroaki Kojima, Tomohiro Shimizu, Shoso Shingubara, Takeshi Ito. Link to Science Direct.
  5. Hemiptera of Canada. Authors: Robert G. Foottit, H. Eric L. Maw, Joel H. Kits, Geoffrey G. E. Scudder. Link to Zookeys.

August 7, 2019

Check for first instar periodical cicada nymphs

Filed under: Magicicada,Nymphs,Periodical — Dan @ 4:26 am

It’s been about six weeks since the emergence of Brood VIII in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Oklahoma. Now (first week of August) is a good a time as any to check for periodical cicada nymphs that have hatched from eggs laid in branches. Once they hatch they’ll find their way to the ground, where they’ll find and begin feeding on roots for the next 17 years.

Look on branches where cicada laid their eggs.

An illustraition of egg nests:

A nymph on a branch with adult male finger for comparison:
Periodical Cicada Nymph

Close up:
Periodical Cicada Nymph

Another close up:
Periodical Cicada Nymph

June 24, 2019

Annual Cicada Season in the U.S.A.

Filed under: Annual — Dan @ 1:01 am

Annual cicada species are those that arrive every year (annually). In the U.S.A., each continental state has at least 4 species of cicadas. California as over 80.

Wonder which annual cicadas are in your area? Try our U.S.A. & Canada Cicada Search search tool. If you’re outside the U.S.A., start your search here.

Some guides for identifying Neotibicen, a common genus of cicadas in North America:

Three other excellent resources include: iNaturalist (enter a cicada name, and find out when people find them), BugGuide (USA), and Insect Singers (for sounds).

Here are a small portion of the species that can be found in the USA:

Diceroprocta apache
Diceroprocta apache
Common Name: Citrus Cicada
Locations: AZ, CA, CO, NV, UT
When: June-September. Peaks in July.

Diceroprocta olympusa
Diceroprocta olympusa
Common Name: Olympic Scrub Cicada
Locations: AL, FL, GA, MS, NC, SC
When: June-August. Peaks in August.
Neocicada hieroglyphica
Neocicada hieroglyphica
Common Name: Hieroglyphic Cicada
Locations: AL, AR, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MS, MO, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA
When: May-August. Peaks in June.
Okanagana bella
Okanagana bella
Common Name: Mountain Cicada
Locations: AB, AZ, BC, CA, CO, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, SD, UT, WA, WY
When: June-July. Peaks in June.
Okanagana rimosa
Okanagana rimosa
Common Name: Say’s Cicada
Locations: AB, BC, CA, CT, ID, IL, IN, IA, ME, MB, MD, MA, MI, MN, MT, NV, NB, NH, NJ, NY, ND, OH, ON, OR, PA, QC, SD, UT, VT, VA, WA, WI, WY
When: May-July. Peak in June.
Neotibicen superbus
Neotibicen superbus
Common Name: Superb Dog-Day Cicada
Locations: AR, KS, LA, MO, NM, OK, TX
When: June-August. Peak in July.
Neotibicen dorsatus
Neotibicen dorsatus
Common Name: Bush Cicada or Grand Western or Giant Grassland Cicada
Locations: AR, CO, ID, IL, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE, NM, OK, SD, TX, WY
When: July-September. Peaks in August.
Cicadettana calliope
Cicadetta calliope
Common Name: Southern Grass Cicada
Locations: AL, AR, CO, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MS, MO, NE, NC, OH, OK, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA
When: May-August, peaking in July.
Neotibicen pruinosus
Neotibicen pruinosus
Common Name: Scissor(s) Grinder
Locations: AL, AR, CO, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NC, OH, OK, PA, SC, SD, TN, TX, WV, WI
When: June-October. Peak in August.

June 21, 2019

My Brood VIII Report

Filed under: Brood VIII,Magicicada,Periodical — Dan @ 7:54 pm

This year Brood VIII periodical cicadas emerged in the Pittsburgh area, and I traveled to see and map them. Unfortunately, I only had 3 days, so I only saw the western side of the Brood.

Mating Magicicada septendecim

All things considered — including cool, cloudy weather (which cicadas don’t like as much as hot & sunny) and a very rainy spring — Brood VIII was the least impressive brood I’ve witnessed, in terms of the sheer number of cicadas. I hope no one in the Pittsburgh area takes offense to that statement — Brood VIII is your brood, and you should be proud of it. It is just that as we humans build more and more, and continue to alter the environment, the numbers of cicadas will steadily dwindle. and I think we’re seeing that happen to Brood VIII.

Here’s an impromptu map of the places I saw cicadas:

Brood VIII Mapping

And a list of places:

  • Allegheny Township
  • Apollo
  • Bethel Township
  • Black Lick
  • Blairsville
  • Blue Spruce Park
  • Bolivar
  • Boyce Park
  • Brush Valley Township
  • Center Township
  • Crooked Creek Horse Park
  • Derry Township
  • Elizabeth
  • Hempfield Township
  • Home
  • Homer City
  • Hoodlebug Trail
  • Indiana
  • Keystone State Park
  • Ligonier
  • New Alexandria
  • New Florence
  • Parks Township
  • Pine Ridge Park
  • Rayne Township
  • Round Hill Park
  • St Clair Township
  • Stahlstown
  • Two Lick Creek Dam
  • Unity
  • Washington Township
  • West Wheatfield Township
  • White Township
  • Yellow Creek State Park

And some photos:

Female Magicicada septendecim

Male Magicicada septendecim

Just a head

Video of the amazing cicada that was just a head.

A very cool Brood VIII cicada frisbee:

Cicada Frisbee

May 11, 2019

2019 Periodical Cicada Stragglers – Expect Them

Filed under: Periodical Stragglers — Dan @ 9:06 am

Where is everyone?

We expect some periodical cicadas to emerge earlier and later than expected this year:

  • Members of Brood IV, the Kansan Brood, should emerge in IA, KS, MO, NE, OK & TX. Brood IV last emerged 4 years ago.
  • Members of Brood XXIII, the Mississippi Valley Brood, should emerge in AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, & TN. XIX last emerged 4 years ago.
  • Members of Brood X are emerging, so far in the Virginia area, but they have the potential to emerge anywhere in DE, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MI, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TN, VA, and WV. 2-year early emergences are rare, but it happens. Brood X is expected to emerge in 2 years.

We’re getting a lot of reports from the Anacostia area of Washington D.C. and Maryland.

Here’s an example of someone Tweeting about a Brood X “straggler” on Twitter.

Use the Cicada Safari App to report them. See a map of sightings reported by the app.

Periodical cicadas are cicadas insects that emerge periodically, and not annually. In North America, there are 7 species of periodical cicadas, 3 of which have a 17-year lifecycle, and 4 have a 13-year lifecycle, and all 7 belong to the genus Magicicada. Here is a chart that shows where they are expected to emerge next. Magicicada regularly straggle — some emerge before or after they’re expected to.

Typically 17-year cicada stragglers emerge 4 years early, and 13-year cicada stragglers emerge 4 years late, but 1, 2 and even 8 year deviations are possible — see the probability chart.

At this point, most people question the use of the term “straggler” to define something that emerged early rather than late. If you’re uncomfortable using the term “straggler”, you can use the term “precursor” for cicadas than emerge earlier than expected. You might make up your own slang for them, like “deviant”, “pioneer” or “laggard” too.

May 1, 2019

Cicada Safari app for tracking Magicicada periodical cicadas

Filed under: Citizen Science,Gene Kritsky,Magicicada,Periodical — Dan @ 9:28 pm

Mount St. Joseph University has released a new app called Cicada Safari. Its purpose is to help you identify periodical (Magicicada, 17-year, 13-year, “locusts”) cicadas, and share the location you found them. Scientists like Dr. Gene Kritsky, of Mount St. Joseph University, will use the data to determine exactly where periodical cicadas exist.

Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=edu.msj.cicadaSafari
iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cicada-safari/id1446471492?mt=8

See a map of sightings reported by the app.

Judging by screenshots of the app, it looks like you can 1) identify cicadas, 2) take a photo and share it, 3) map the location where you found it, 4) compete with other cicada scientists for the most cicadas found. Looks that way at least.

Cicada Safari App

Cicada Safari App

March 24, 2019

Platypleura watsoni = Platypleura mokensis

Platypleura watsoni, also known as Platypleura mokensis, is a cicada found in Thailand, India, and Myanmar (Burma), and very likely adjacent nations.

Photo by Michel Chantraine:
Platypleura mokensis

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Platypleurini
Genus: Platypleura
Species: Platypleura watsoni (Distant, 1897)

References:

  1. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

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