Cicada Mania

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April 15, 2020

Common Cicadas of North America

Filed under: Canada | North America (Continent) | United States — Dan @ 6:34 pm

This is a list of the most well-known cicadas in North America.

Annual Cicada Species

These cicadas appear ever year.

Cacama valvata (Uhler, 1888)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - valvata - Adam Fleishman
©Adam Fleishman.

  • Short Name: C. valvata
  • Common Name: Common Cactus Dodger
  • Locations: AZ, CA, CO, KS, NV, NM, OK, TX, UT
  • When: May-June, peaking in June.
  • Eyes: beige and black mix
  • Collar: black with gold highlights
  • Description: Black with gold highlights and white pruinose.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Cicadettana calliope calliope (Walker, 1850)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - calliope - Paul Krombholz
©Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: C. calliope calliope
  • Common Name: Southern Grass Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CO, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MS, MO, NE, NC, OH, OK, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA
  • When: May-August, peaking in July.
  • Eyes: pink, beige
  • Collar: rust, brown
  • Description: Small. Black and brown.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Diceroprocta apache (Davis, 1921)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - apache - Adam Fleishman
© Adam Fleishman


Diceroprocta olympusa (Walker, 1850)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - olympusa - Joe Green
© Joe Green.

  • Short Name: D. olympusa
  • Common Name: Olympic Scrub Cicada
  • Locations: AL, FL, GA, MS, NC, SC
  • When: June-August. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: brown?
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Black, brown and green with white pruinose.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Diceroprocta vitripennis (Say, 1830)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - vitripennis - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: D. vitripennis
  • Common Name: Green Winged Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MI, MS, MO, NE, OK, TN, TX, WI
  • When: June-August. Peaks in July.
  • Eyes: green
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Black with green and brown and white pruinose.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen auletes (Germar, 1834)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Auletes - Dan

  • Short Name: M. auletes
  • Common Name: Northern Dusk Singing Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MA, MI, MS, MO, NE, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV, WI
  • When: June-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: gray / beige
  • Collar: olive or rusty brown
  • Description: The largest North American cicada. Olive green to rusty brown with black, tan and white coloring. Heavy white pruinosis. M on mesonotum typically partially ocluded by pruinosis. Sings at dusk.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen dealbatus (Davis, 1915)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - dealbatus - Bill Reynolds collection

  • Short Name: M. dealbatus
  • Common Name: Plains Cicada
  • Locations: CO, IA, KS, MT, NE, NM, ND, OK, SD, TX, WY
  • When: June-October. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: beige
  • Collar: light orange or olive
  • Description: Primarily either orange/rust or pea green, brown, black with heavy pruninosity which forms distinct markings on dorsal side of body. Dorsal side has two black stripes framed by three areas of pruinosity. Sounds like N. pronotalis.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen dorsatus (Say, 1825)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - dorsatus - Bill Lesar
© Bill Lesar

  • Short Name: M. dorsatus
  • Common Name: Bush Cicada or Grand Western or Giant Grassland Cicada
  • Locations: AR, CO, ID, IL, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE, NM, OK, SD, TX, WY
  • When: July-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: beige to brown
  • Collar: light orange
  • Description: Rust/orange, black & white pruinosity, which forms distinct markings, such as a line of white dots down the dorsal side of the abdomen. Sounds like N. tremulus. Has a call that sounds like a rapid series of clicks.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen figuratus (Walker, 1858)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - figuratus - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: M. figuratus
  • Common Name: Fall Southeastern Dusk-singing Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX, VA
  • When: August-October. Peaks in September.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: brown
  • Description: Black and browns. White pruinosis.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen pronotalis walkeri Metcalf, 1955

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Walkers - Roy Troutman
© Roy Troutman

  • Short Name: M. pronotalis walkeri
  • Common Name: Walker’s Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NC, ND, OH, OK, SD, TN, TX, VA, WV, WI, WY
  • When: July-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: gray
  • Collar: green or brown
  • Description: Tan or pea green, brown, black, and sometimes white pruinose. Wing color matches dominant color of body. Typically lacks a black marking on its pronotum.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen resh (Haldeman, 1852)

©Insect Singers.
Thumbs - Resh - Bill Reynolds collection

  • Short Name: M. resh
  • Common Name: Resh Cicada
  • Locations: AR, KS, LA, MS, NE, OK, SC, TN, TX
  • When: May-October. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: varies
  • Collar: olive
  • Description: Black, green and brown camo pattern. White pruinosis. Resh Hebrew character pattern on mesonotum.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen resonans (Walker, 1850)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - resonans - Joe Green
© Joe Green

  • Short Name: M. resonans
  • Common Name: Southern Resonant/Great Pine Barrens Cicada
  • Locations: AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX, VA
  • When: May-October. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: brown
  • Description: Brown, black & white pruinosity distinctively present within curves of the cruciform elevation.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neocicada hieroglyphica hieroglyphica (Say, 1830)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - hieroglyphica - Joe Green
© Joe Green

  • Short Name: N. hieroglyphica hieroglyphica
  • Common Name: Hieroglyphic Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MS, MO, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA
  • When: May-August. Peaks in June.
  • Eyes: varies
  • Collar: varies
  • Description: Black, brown and green patterns.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen canicularis (Harris, 1841)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Dog Day - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: N. canicularis
  • Common Name: Dog-day Cicada
  • Locations: AR, CT, DC, IL, IN, IA, KS, ME, MB, MD, MA, MI, MN, MO, NE, NB, NH, NJ, NY, NC, ND, NS, OH, ON, PA, PE, QC, RI, SC, SD, TN, VT, VA, WV, WI
  • When: July-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: varies
  • Collar: varies
  • Description: Typical black, brown, beige and green Tibicen camo patterns. Primary color varies from browns to greens. Collar is often a mix of green & black. Sounds like an angle grinder tool, and like N. auriferus & N. davisi.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen davisi davisi (Smith and Grossbeck, 1907)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - davisi - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: N. davisi davisi
  • Common Name: Davis’ Southeastern Dog-Day Cicada
  • Locations: AL, DE, DC, FL, GA, LA, MD, MA, MS, NJ, NY, NC, PA, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV
  • When: August-December. Peaks in September.
  • Eyes: varies
  • Collar: brown or green
  • Description: The davisi comes in a wide variety of colors: from rusty browns to greens. A crown-like pattern on the mesonotum. Sounds like an angle grinder tool, & sounds like N. auriferus & N. canicularis.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen latifasciatus (Davis, 1915)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Latifasciatus - Bill Reynolds collection

  • Short Name: N. latifasciatus
  • Common Name: Coastal Scissor(s) Grinder Cicada
  • Locations: FL, MD, NJ, NC, VA
  • When: August-October. Peaks in September.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: brown or green
  • Description: If the cicada has a white X on its back, it is a latifasciatus. Repetitive, rhythmic, call like someone repeatedly running a scissor over a grinding wheel.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen linnei (Smith and Grossbeck, 1907)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Linnei - Tom Lehmkuhl
© Tom Lehmkuhl

  • Short Name: N. linnei
  • Common Name: Linne’s Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NJ, NY, NC, OH, ON, PA, SC, TN, VT, VA, WV, WI
  • When: July-September. Peak in August.
  • Eyes: dark brown
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Black, green and some brown camo pattern. Prominent M. Bend in its wing. Sounds like N. tibicen.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen lyricen engelhardti (Davis, 1910)

Thumb - Dark Lyric - Roy Troutman
© Roy Troutman

  • Short Name: N. lyricen engelhardti
  • Common Name: Dark Lyric Cicada
  • Locations: AL, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IN, IL, KY, MD, MA, MS, NJ, NY, NC, OH, PA, RI, SC, TN, VA, WV
  • When: July-September. Peaks in July.
  • Eyes: black
  • Collar: black
  • Description: The Dark Lyric Cicadas have the darkest coloration of all the Lyric cicadas. Their mesonotum is almost entirely dark brown/black. They have a “soda-pop pull-tab” or keyhole shape on their pronotum.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen lyricen lyricen (De Geer, 1773)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Lyric - Dan

  • Short Name: N. lyricen lyricen
  • Common Name: Lyric Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MA, MI, MS, MO, NE, NH, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, ON, PA, RI, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV, WI
  • When: June-August. Peak in July.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: black
  • Description: The Lyric cicada, like most small Neotibicen, has a green, black & brown camouflage look, but the key is Lyric cicadas typically have black collars. Its sound is like an angle grinder tool steadily grinding a slightly uneven surface.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen pruinosus pruinosus (Say, 1825)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Pruinosa - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: N. pruinosus pruinosus
  • Common Name: Scissor(s) Grinder
  • Locations: AL, AR, CO, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NC, OH, OK, PA, SC, SD, TN, TX, WV, WI
  • When: June-October. Peak in August.
  • Eyes: black
  • Collar: green
  • Description: The Scissor Grinder looks a lot like Linne’s Cicada but their wing doesn’t have bend that Linne’s Cicada has. The Scissor Grinder also seems to have more of an orange coloration to the ‘arches’ on its mesonotum.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen superbus (Fitch, 1855)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Superb - Sloan Childers
© Sloan Childers

  • Short Name: N. superbus
  • Common Name: Superb Dog-Day Cicada
  • Locations: AR, KS, LA, MO, NM, OK, TX
  • When: June-August. Peak in July.
  • Eyes: black
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Green with black mask and yellow arches on back.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen tibicen tibicen (Linnaeus, 1758)


Thumb - Chloromera - Dan

  • Short Name: N. tibicen tibicen
  • Common Name: Swamp Cicada, Morning Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MA, MI, MS, MO, NE, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, VT, VA, WV, WI
  • When: June-September. Peak in August.
  • Eyes: black or dark green
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Swamp Cicadas are are known for their rounded, humped back. Their coloration varies from mostly black & some green to black, brown and green. Their collar is usually black, but can include green.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen winnemanna (Davis, 1912)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - winnemanna - Dan

  • Short Name: N. winnemanna
  • Common Name: Eastern Scissor(s) Grinder
  • Locations: DE, DC, GA, MD, NC, NJ, PA, SC, VA
  • When: June-September. Peak in September.
  • Eyes: dark green
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Like the Scissor Grinder, the Eastern Scissor Grinder seems to have more of an orange hue to the arches on its mesonotum, perhaps even more so than the Scissor Grinder.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Okanagana bella Davis, 1919

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Bella - Matt Berger
© Matt Berger

  • Short Name: O. bella
  • Common Name: Mountain Cicada
  • Locations: AB, AZ, BC, CA, CO, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, SD, UT, WA, WY
  • When: June-July. Peaks in June.
  • Eyes: black
  • Collar: orange
  • Description: Black with orange highlights.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Okanagana canadensis (Provancher, 1889)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - canadensis - Les Daniels
© Les Daniels

  • Short Name: O. canadensis
  • Common Name: Canadian Cicada
  • Locations: AB, BC, CA, CO, ID, ME, MB, MI, MN, MT, NB, NH, NY, NT, OH, ON, OR, PA, QC, SK, SD, UT, VT, WI
  • When: June-July. Peaks in June.
  • Eyes: dark gray
  • Collar: black and beige
  • Description: Black with beige highlights.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Okanagana rimosa rimosa (Say, 1830)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Rimosa - Natasha
© Natasha

  • Short Name: O. rimosa rimosa
  • Common Name: Say’s Cicada
  • Locations: AB, BC, CA, CT, ID, IL, IN, IA, ME, MB, MD, MA, MI, MN, MT, NV, NB, NH, NJ, NY, ND, OH, ON, OR, PA, QC, SD, UT, VT, VA, WA, WI, WY
  • When: May-July. Peak in June.
  • Eyes: n/a
  • Collar: n/a
  • Description: n/a
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Pacarina puella Davis, 1923

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Puella - John Beard
© John Beard


Quesada gigas (Olivier, 1790)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Gigas - Leonardo Milhomem
© Leonardo Milhomem

  • Short Name: Q. gigas
  • Common Name: Giant Cicada
  • Locations: TX
  • When: Always out somewhere in the Americas. Peak in July.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: brown to green
  • Description: The second largest North American cicada. Black, green and brown camo patterns.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Periodical Cicadas

These cicadas have 17 or 13 year life cycles. Visit the Periodical Cicada Information Page for when and where.

Magicicada cassinii (Fisher, 1852)


Thumb - cassini - Dan

  • Short Name: M. cassini
  • Common Name: Cassini Periodical Cicada or 17-Year Cicada
  • Locations: GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MD, MO, NC, NE, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, TN, TX, VA, WI, WV
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 17 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - neotredecim - Dan

  • Short Name: M. neotredecim
  • Common Name: 13 Periodical Cicada or 13-Year Cicada or John and David’s Cicada
  • Locations: AR, IA, IL, IN, KY, MO, TN
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 13 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen. Orange between eye and wing.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758)


Thumb - Septendecim - Dan

  • Short Name: M. septendecim
  • Common Name: Decim Periodical Cicada or Linnaeus’s 17-Year Cicada or 17-Year Cicada
  • Locations: CT, DC, DE, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MA, MD, MI, MO, NC, NE, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, SC, TN, VA, WI, WV
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 17 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen. Orange between eye and wing.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

© Joe Green.
Thumb - septendecula - Dan

  • Short Name: M. septendecula
  • Common Name: Decula Periodical Cicdada or 17-Year Cicada
  • Locations: GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MO, NC, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, TN, VA, WV
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 17 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962


Thumb - tredecassini

  • Short Name: M. tredecassini
  • Common Name: 13-Year Cicada or 13-Year Cassini
  • Locations: AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 13 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868)

©Insect Singers
Thumb - tredecim - Dan

  • Short Name: M. tredecim
  • Common Name: 13-Year Cicada or 13-Year Decim
  • Locations: AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 13 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen. Orange between eye and wing.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962


Thumb - tredecula - Dan

  • Short Name: M. tredecula
  • Common Name: 13-Year Cicada or 13-Year Decula
  • Locations: AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA
  • When: May-June. Peak in June. Every 13 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on abdomen.
  • >More info, photos, sounds, video and references



Related Resources

Most sound files are Copyright of Insect Singers.

Maps: Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico [PDF]

Didn’t find what you’re looking for? Try these websites about the cicadas of North America, or these blog posts about United States and Canada.

Click the images for larger versions, the species name and the name of the photographer.

January 11, 2019

Quesada gigas (Olivier, 1790) aka Giant Cicada

Quesada gigas (Olivier, 1790) Is a cicada found in the United States (Texas), Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Guyana, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Tobago, Trinidad, and Venezuela. It is the largest cicada in these locations.

Quesada gigas from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem
Quesada gigas from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem.

‚≠Ę All Quesada gigas photos and information on cicadamania.com.

Song

Source: ©Insect Singers | Species: Q. gigas

Playlists contain multiple videos found on YouTube.

Name, Location and Description

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Fidicinini
Genus: Quesada
Species: Quesada gigas (Olivier, 1790)

Quesada gigas (Olivier, 1790)
The image says Tympanoterpes gigas but its newest name is Quesada gigas.

Species description notes from Insect. Rhynchota.:

Stal treated this species as a synonym of T. grossa, Fabr. The type of the Fabrician species, however, is in the Banksian collection contained in the British Museum, and is very distinct, the opercula being large and rounded.

The figure given in the Encyclopedic Methodique is, like Stal’s, useless for any practical purpose. Among the habitats of this wide-ranging species is that given by Walker 2, ” West coast of America,” which, as before remarked in connexion with other species, seems clearly to refer to Central America. The forms inhabiting this region (of which a Guatemalan specimen is figured) appear to be somewhat smaller than more southern specimens, or do not exhibit the gigantic specimens which are frequently and commonly received from the southern portion of the Neotropical Region.

Mr. Gervase F. Mathew (Ent. Mo. Mag. xi. p. 175) gives some interesting details relating to this insect as observed at Tobago. As regards its powers of stridulation he writes of a ” tropical afternoon: ” ‚ÄĒ ” Suddenly, from right above, you hear one or two hoarse, monotonous cries something like the croak of a tree-frog, and, looking upwards, wonder what it can be. But wait a moment ; this is merely a signal ; for the next minute everywhere above and around you these croaks are repeated in rapid and increasing succession until they merge into a long shrill whistle almost exactly similar to the whistle of a first-rate locomotive ; this continues for nearly half a minute, and then abruptly terminates.” ” Presently similar cries will be heard in the far distance, as if in reply to those which have just died away overhead. The whistling pierces one’s ears to such a degree that its vibrations can be felt long after it has ceased.”

Mr. Mathew describes this species as frequenting trees growing in ravines where the soil is generally soft and damp, in which their larvae and pupae find no difficulty in burrowing. ” When the latter are full-grown and ready for their last transformation, they emerge from the ground and crawl about four or five feet up the trunk of a tree, when they firmly fix themselves to the bark by means of their powerfully hooked fore tibiae.” ” The flight of the mature Cicada is abrupt, rapid, and by no means graceful ; and it does not appear to have the power of controlling itself when on the wing ; for I have often seen it fly in an insane manner against the trunk of a tree, a branch, or any other object that might be in its line of flight; and when it has performed its journey without any accident, it alights abruptly and awkwardly. As a rule, however, it does not attempt to fly to any great distance at a time.”

Resources:

The Giant Cicada / Chicharra Grande page on the Texas Entomology websites is a very good resource, particularly in relation to the state of Texas.

References:

  1. The illustration comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).
  3. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  4. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  5. Locations: Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico by Allen F. Sanborn and Polly K. Phillips.
  6. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  7. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al.¬†A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification.¬†Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1‚Äď64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1
  8. Notes:

    • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

January 9, 2019

Neocicada australamexicana Sanborn & Sueur, 2005

Neocicada australamexicana Sanborn & Sueur, 2005 is a cicada found in Mexico. There’s a very similar cicada in the United Stated called Neocicada hieroglyphica hieroglyphica (Say, 1830).

Neocicada australamexicana was formerly known as Tettigia hieroglyphica.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cicadini
SubTribe: Leptopsaltriina [slender Harp player in Greek]
Genus: Neocicada
Species: Neocicada australamexicana Sanborn & Sueur, 2005

Neocicada australamexicana Sanborn & Sueur, 2005
The image says Tettigia hieroglyphica, but the newest name for this cicada is Neocicada australamexicana.

References:

  1. The illustration comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

January 8, 2019

Tettigades mexicana Distant, 1881

Filed under: Mexico | North America (Continent) | Rhynchota | Tettigades | Tettigadini | W. L. Distant — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Tettigades mexicana Distant, 1881, is a cicada found in Mexico.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Tibicininae
Tribe: Tettigadini
Genus: Tettigades
Species: Tettigades mexicana Distant, 1881

Tettigades mexicana Distant, 1881

Species description by W. L. Distant:

Head above black, front with an arcuated fascia at each, side of base of face on anterior margin, an indistinct, narrow, broken, central longitudinal fascia on vertex, and a broad streak behind inner margin of eyes, luteous. Pronotum with the disk ochraceous, having a large reversed triangular spot on anterior margin, a large oblique patch on each side behind eyes, and a small central transverse line near posterior margin fuscous; anterior border narrowly, lateral and posterior borders broadly luteous. Mesonotum black, with two central pale lines commencing on anterior margin and terminating about one third the length of mesonotum; basal elevation with large horn-like and branching angles extending therefrom to about centre of disk, and frenum, luteous. Abdomen black, strongly pilose, with the posterior segmental borders narrowly ochraceous. Underside of body and legs luteous ; base and central fascia to face, inner margin of eyes, some irregular marks on sternum and near coxae, a linear streak on each side of femora, a spot on trochanters, a marginal segmental row of spots to abdomen, and a large quadrate spot on apical segment fuscous. Tegmina pale hyaline; radial and postcostal veins, and venation of apical third of tegmina fuscous; postcostal ulnar ramus and remaining venation luteous. “Wings pale hyaline; basal half of venation luteous, apical half fuscous.

The face is moderately convex and gibbous, distinctly transversely striated, with a broad central longitudinal sulcation, the edges of which are slightly raised. The rostrum in the typical specimen has the apical joint mutilated, but apparently about reaches the posterior coxa?. The anterior femora are armed with two strong spines. Body very strongly pilose.

Long. 22 millim., exp. tegm. 68 millim.

References:

  1. The illustration comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

January 7, 2019

Ollanta modesta (Distant, 1881)

Filed under: Fidicinini | Mexico | News | North America (Continent) | Rhynchota | W. L. Distant — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Ollanta modesta (Distant, 1881) is a cicada found in Mexico and Nicaragua.

Ollanta modesta was formerly known as Selymbria modesta.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Fidicinini
SubTribe: Guyalnina
Genus: Ollanta
Species: Ollanta modesta (Distant, 1881)

Ollanta modesta (Distant, 1881)
The image says Selymbria modesta, but the newest name of this cicada is Ollanta modesta.

Species description by W. L. Distant:

Body dull testaceous. Head with the frontal margin, area of the ocelli, and posterior margin of eyes fuscous. Pronotum with two central fuscous fasciae on anterior margin, and sometimes two smaller ones on posterior margin. Mesonotum with two large obconical central spots on anterior margin; on each side of these a longer and more obscure obconical fascia, and a transverse fascia on disk, preceded by two small spots, fuscous. Basal margins of scutellum and abdominal segments fuscous. Body beneath paler; anterior margin of head and inner margin of eyes black. Tegmina pale hyaline; neuration ochraceous or dull testaceous (sometimes with the basal half much paler); transverse veins at the base of second and third apical areas, and a submarginal row of spots on longitudinal veins of first, second, and third apical areas fuscous. Wings pale hyaline, with the nervures ochraceous or testaceous.

Head, including eyes, equal in breadth to base of pronotum; face with a very deep central longitudinal sulcation, and strongly and transversely striate. Opercula pale, broad, not passing base of first abdominal segment, and narrowed but not meeting interiorly.

Long. 16 millim., exp. tegm. 57 millim.

This is the only Central- American species of the genus with which I am acquainted. It varies somewhat in the markings of the pronotum and mesonotum.

References:

  1. The illustration comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

January 6, 2019

Proarna sallaei Stål, 1864

Filed under: Carl St√•l | Fidicinini | Mexico | North America (Continent) | Proarna | Rhynchota — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Proarna sallaei Stål, 1864 is a cicada found in Mexico.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Fidicinini
SubTribe: Guyalnina
Genus: Proarna
Species: Proarna sallaei Stål, 1864

References:

  1. The illustration comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

January 5, 2019

Cacama maura (Distant, 1881)

Filed under: Cryptotympanini | Mexico | North America (Continent) | Rhynchota | W. L. Distant — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Cacama maura (Distant, 1881) is a cicada found in Mexico.

Cacama maura was formerly known as Proarna maura, but its name changed when it moved from the genus Cacama Distant, 1904 to the genus Proarna Stål, 1864.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Cacama
Species: Cacama maura (Distant, 1881)

Cacama maura (Distant, 1881)
The image says Proarna maura, but the newest name of this cicada is Cacama maura.

Species description by W. L. Distant:

Body and legs black; frontal margin of head, posterior margin of pronotum, lateral margins of face, apices of femora, and bases of tibiae dull obscure ochraceous; eyes luteous; lateral margins of sternum broadly margined with white pile. Tegmina pale hyaline, veins fuscous; basal area, costal membrane, and transverse veins at bases of second and third apical areas black. “Wings hyaline, veins fuscous, basal area black.

Body very broad and robust, with the segmental apices acute; head, including eyes, much narrower than base of pronotum. Face with the sides strongly striated, centre not sulcated, its width equal to its distance from outer margin of eyes. Rostrum reaching posterior coxae. Opercula large, oblong, black, straight outwardly, rounded posteriorly, slightly overlapping at inner margins near base.

Long. 25 millim., exp. tegm. 70 millim.

This species represents a distinct section of the genus, having the apices of the segments acute and the body very broad. This division, in every respect, including the black colour, exactly corresponds with a like divergence in the genus Cicada, as represented by C. robusta, Dist.

References:

  1. The illustration, location info and descriptions comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

January 4, 2019

Cacama longirostris (Distant, 1881)

Cacama longirostris (Distant, 1881) is a cicada found in Mexico.

Cacama longirostris was formerly known as Proarna longirostris, but its name changed when it moved from the genus Cacama Distant, 1904 to the genus Proarna Stål, 1864.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Cacama
Species: Cacama longirostris (Distant, 1881)

Cacama longirostris (Distant, 1881)
The image says Proarna longirostris, but the newest name of this cicada is Cacama longirostris.

Species description by W. L. Distant:

Closely allied to P. maura [now Cacama maura (Distant, 1881)], Dist., but differs by the greater amount of the ochraceous markings on the pro- and mesonotum, in having a large ochraceous spot on each lateral margin of the abdomen above, and a small spot of the same colour on each side of the anal appendage, in the much smaller black basal area to the tegmina, and the almost absence of the same to the wings. The body beneath, including the legs and opercula, is ochraceous, the abdomen having the lateral margins and anal appendage black. Its principal structural difference is the length of the rostrum, which reaches the apex of the first abdominal segment.

Long. 24 millim., exp. tegm. 71 millim.

References:

  1. The illustration comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

January 3, 2019

Pacarina championi (Distant, 1881)

Pacarina championi (Distant, 1881) is a cicada found in Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Fidicinini
SubTribe: Guyalnina
Genus: Pacarina
Species: Pacarina championi (Distant, 1881)

Pacarina championi was formerly known as Proarna championi. Its name changed when it moved from the genus Proarna Stål, 1864 to the genus Pacarina Distant, 1905.

Pacarina championi (Distant, 1881)
The image says Proarna championi but its newest name is Pacarina championi.

Species description by W. L. Distant:

Body above dull testaceous, somewhat sparingly pilose. Head with the frontal margin, a transverse fascia in front of eyes, and area of the ocelli black. Pronotum with two central longitudinal fasciae, two oblique striae on each side, and inner lateral margin black. Mesonotum with two large obconical basal spots, bordered on each side by a larger obconical fascia, and a small transverse fascia on disk, preceded by two small rounded spots, black. Abdomen above somewhat thickly covered with white pile, and with the basal segmental margins fuscous. Body beneath paler; anterior submarginal fascia to head, central fascia and transverse ridges to face, and apex of rostrum black. Legs unicolorous, apices of tibiae and tarsi testaceous.

Tegmina pale hyaline; veins ochraceous, darker towards apex; base and apex of first apical area, and transverse veins at base of second and third apical areas, broadly fuscous; base of first ulnar area thickened, opaque, and fuscous. Wings pale hyaline, veins ochraceous.

The face is globose, strongly transversely striated, but not sulcated longitudinally; and in width, it equals its distance from outer margin of eyes. The opercula are broad, not passing base of first abdominal segment, somewhat narrowed and almost meeting interiorly. (In the specimen figured the opercula are pale and unicolorous; in other specimens, they are inwardly and broadly margined with black.)

Long. 14 to 16 millim., exp. tegm. 45 to 52 millim.

References:

  1. The illustration comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name information comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

January 2, 2019

Well, the genus is still Proarna

This one’s a bit of a brain twister, so I’m going to dump some facts and run.

Proarna albida is a former name for two species: Proarna insignis Distant, 1881 and Proarna olivieri Metcalf, 1963.

Scientific classification down the genus:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Fidicinini
SubTribe: Guyalnina
Genus: Proarna

The image below might be either one…

Description for Proarna albida from Insecta. Rhynchota.:

This species is strikingly variable, both in size and also as regards the length of the second apical area of the tegmina. Stoll’s figure being very unsatisfactory, I have here figured a specimen from Costa Rica.

Found in: Costa Rica, Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname, and Brazil.

Description for Proarna insignis from Insecta. Rhynchota.:

Var. insignis:

Body much broader than in any varietal forms of P. albida which have passed through my hands, lateral margins of pronotum more ampliated, markings of the tegmina darker and more distinct.

Long. 24 millim., exp. tegm. 63 millim.

Three females possessing this form have passed through my hands. As I have not seen the their sex, and can find no sufficient structural character in the female of specific value, I have felt it necessary to give a varietal name for the present, to prevent confusion.

Found in NicaraPanamand Panama.

For comparison sake, P. olivieri is found in Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Venezuela, Brazil, Guyana, French Guiana, Surinam, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Cuba, Central America, South America. All over the place. From the notes within the Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

Whatever the latest name for Proarna albida is, it’s a nice looking cicada:
Proarna olivieri Metcalf, 1963

References:

  1. The illustration comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Name information from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

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