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March 10, 2018

Cicadas of New Zealand guidebook

Filed under: Books,New Zealand — Dan @ 9:15 am

There’s a new guidebook out for the cicadas of New Zealand. The book was produced by 10-year-old Olly Hills — proof that there are few age barriers to scientific interest and research.

Website for the book.

Facebook page for the book.


Cicada Papers of 2018

Filed under: Papers and Documents — Dan @ 8:32 am

This page will feature a running list of cicada papers published in 2018. I’ll update it as the year progresses.

If a missed a paper, email me at


  • The cicada genus Procollina Metcalf, 1952 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae): redescription including fourteen new species, with a key to the species of the subtribe Dazina Kato, 1932 rev. stat., the description of the Aragualnini n. tribe, and one new combination. Author: Allen F. Sanborn. Link to Paper.


  • Revision, phylogeny and phylogeography of the cicada genus Auritibicen (Hemiptera: Cicadidae), with descriptions of ten new species. Authors: Xu Wang, Masami Hayashi, Cong Wei. Link to paper.


  • A specialized fungal parasite (Massospora cicadina) hijacks the sexual signals of periodical cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Magicicada). Authors: John R. Cooley, David C. Marshall & Kathy B. R. Hill. Link to paper.
  • Germalna, a new genus for the New Caledonian cicada previously assigned to the genus Melampsalta Kolenati, plus a complement to the description of the genus Rouxalna Boulard, with the description of two new species (Insecta: Hemiptera, Cicadoidea, Cicadidae). Author: Quentin Delorme. Link to paper.
  • The distribution, morphology and some bioecological properties of Cicadatra platyptera Fieber, 1876 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) in Izmir province of Turkey. Authors: Cevdet Kaplan, Serdar Tezcan. Link to paper.
  • A new genus and species of Cicada from Vietnam: Cochleopsaltria duffelsi gen. et sp. nov. (Hemiptera: Cicadomorpha: Cicadidae). Authors: Thai Hong Pham, Jérôme Constant. Link to paper.

March 7, 2018

Cicada Merch

Filed under: Cicada Mania — Dan @ 8:13 pm

If you want to support Cicada Mania, the best way is to share the site with friends and family… but you can also buy some Cicada Merchandise.

Select from the designs below, to get shirts, mugs, hats and other things with the image added to it:

Keep Calm, They’re Only 17-Year Cicadas:

for Men or Women.

Cute Cicada Cartoon:

Classic Cicada Mania Logo:

Green Grocer cicada:

Bug of Mystery:

Magicicada septendecim:

Blue Eyed cicada:

Red Eyed cicada:

Big Mess of cicadas:

January 23, 2018

Second edition of Cicadas of North American North of Mexico

Filed under: Allen F. Sanborn,Maxine E. Heath — Dan @ 5:31 am

Allen F. Sanborn and Maxine S. Heath have released the second edition of their book Cicadas of North American North of Mexico.

What’s new:

The second edition includes the addition of four new genera, the removal of two genera, and the addition of a few new species that were described since the first edition. We also added distributional data for all species.

Purchase a copy online from the Entomological Society of America.

Related articles:

New paper: Massospora cicadina) hijacks the sexual signals of periodical cicadas

A new paper, A specialized fungal parasite (Massospora cicadina) hijacks the sexual signals of periodical cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Magicicada), has been published by John R. Cooley, David C. Marshall & Kathy B. R. Hill, in Scientific Reports 8, Article number: 1432 (2018).

Read the paper online.

In a nutshell: the fungus infects males and causes them to exactly mimic the mating behavior of female cicadas, thus infected males end up spreading the fungus to uninfected males.


Male periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) infected with conidiospore-producing (“Stage I”) infections of the entomopathogenic fungus Massospora cicadina exhibit precisely timed wing-flick signaling behavior normally seen only in sexually receptive female cicadas. Male wing-flicks attract copulation attempts from conspecific males in the chorus; close contact apparently spreads the infective conidiospores. In contrast, males with “Stage II” infections that produce resting spores that wait for the next cicada generation do not produce female-specific signals. We propose that these complex fungus-induced behavioral changes, which resemble apparently independently derived changes in other cicada-Massospora systems, represent a fungus “extended phenotype” that hijacks cicadas, turning them into vehicles for fungus transmission at the expense of the cicadas’ own interests.

And now, because I need an image for the post: a meme:

Fungus Bae

Cicadas, when infected, are called “salt shakers of doom”. Add that to the meme “Salt Bae”, and the image makes sense.

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