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July 15, 2018

Annual Cicada Mania

Filed under: Annual — Dan @ 1:01 am

Annual cicada species are those that arrive every year (annually). In the U.S.A., each continental state has at least 4 species of cicadas. California as over 80.

Wonder which annual cicadas are in your area? Try our U.S.A. & Canada Cicada Search search tool. If you’re outside the U.S.A., start your search here.

Some guides for identifying Neotibicen, a common genus of cicadas in North America:

Here are a small portion of the species that can be found in the USA:

Diceroprocta apache
Diceroprocta apache
Found in: AZ, CA, CO, NV, UT
Diceroprocta olympusa
Diceroprocta olympusa
Found in: AL, FL, GA, MS, NC, SC
Neocicada hieroglyphica
Neocicada hieroglyphica
Found in: AL, AR, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MS, MO, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA
Okanagana bella
Okanagana bella
Found in: AB, AZ, BC, CA, CO, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, SD, UT, WA, WY
Okanagana rimosa
Okanagana rimosa
Found in: AB, BC, CA, CT, ID, IL, IN, IA, ME, MB, MD, MA, MI, MN, MT, NV, NB, NH, NJ, NY, ND, OH, ON, OR, PA, QC, SD, UT, VT, VA, WA, WI, WY
Neotibicen superbus
Neotibicen superbus
Found in: AR, KS, LA, MO, NM, OK, TX
Neotibicen dorsatus
Neotibicen dorsatus
Found in: AR, CO, ID, IL, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE, NM, OK, SD, TX, WY
Cicadettana calliope
Cicadetta calliope
Found in: AL, AR, CO, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MS, MO, NE, NC, OH, OK, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA
Neotibicen pruinosus
Neotibicen pruinosus
Found in: AL, AR, CO, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, PA, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA, WV, WI

July 4, 2018

Are cicadas safe to eat? 🍲

Filed under: Eating Cicadas,Magicicada,Periodical — Dan @ 1:01 am

Update (July 2018): A company called Meat Maniac sells cicadas in a can. Don’t know which species, but they have a “nutty flavor”.

Also, send me a box of these cicadas from China… um, I mean Chinese City Tells Citizens to Fight Bug Infestation By Eating Them.

Meat Maniac cicadas in a can

Also, read this amazing story about how Brood VII cicadas helped kept the Onondaga Nation alive during a time of famine.

The original article from 2006:

[WARNING:] Cicadas, 17-year cicadas at least, are well-known bioaccumulators of mercury. If consuming mercury is a concern, you should not eat cicadas.

Dogs, cats, squirrels, fish, and people can’t stop eating cicadas. Are they crazy, or “crazy like a fox”? (Foxes will eat them too.)

Pets and other domesticated animals

This is a cartoon of a dog about to eat a cicada

People want to know: “is it safe for my pets to eat cicadas”. The truth is in most cases your pets will be fine if they eat a few cicadas, however, you still need to be cautious and keep a close eye on your pets. Watch them for odd behavior, and don’t let them gorge themselves. Be cautious: the Humane Society has warned: “Cicadas Dangerous to Pets” [the original link is gone].

Pet-related concerns:

  1. Pets can choke on the rigid wings and other hard body parts of the cicadas.
  2. Pets will gorge themselves on cicadas, and possibly become ill and vomit.
  3. Pets who consume cicadas sprayed with copious amounts of pesticide can and will die.
  4. Pets might have an allergic reaction to the cicadas just as people do.

Bottom line: play it safe, and don’t let your pets eat cicadas if you can help it.

People:

Whether they’re curious, hungry, or doing it for the shock value, people are eating cicadas. Asian peoples have eaten cicadas for centuries, and there are records of Native Americans eating cicadas. People joke that they’re Atkins friendly [also no gluten]. I’ve heard they taste like asparagus, popcorn, minty shrimp, and piney shrimp — YUMMY PINE.

A man in Bloomington Indiana had an allergic reaction to cicadas after eating 30. He was also allergic to seafood — both cicadas and shrimps are arthropods so this makes sense.

[Note to self, “Do it, Dan, don’t be a wimp!”]

People related concerns:

  1. Cicadas are well known bioaccumulators of mercury.
  2. You could choke on their hard body parts.
  3. You could have an allergic reaction. If you’re allergic to seafood, don’t think about eating them.
  4. Do you really want to eat something that’s been marinating in lawn fertilizers,
    pesticides and other chemicals for the past 17 years?
  5. If you get the gout, it makes sense to avoid them.

People related links:

  1. National Geographic: National Geographic News :Low-Fat, High Protein Cicadas: New Health Snack
  2. Stephanie Bailey’s Internet insect cookbook has tips on how to prepare insects for human consumption! [note that the link now goes to an article by Stephanie about eating insects in general.]

Bottom line: You’re not a contestant on Fear Factor [a reality TV show in the 00s]. Why eat cicadas when you can choose from many of the fine menu choices at Applebees [a chain restaurant]?

Fish, turkeys, squirrels and everything else

If a creature has a mouth or some other mechanism to digest cicadas, it likely will try to eat them. Cicadas make great fish bait. Squirrels (yes, they’re nuts for cicadas too), birds, possums, raccoons, foxes, other insects, fungi… they all love cicadas.

Bottom line: let nature do the dirty work and clean your yard one bite at a time.

Tom eats a cicada
Tom: Cicada Gormandize.


June 23, 2018

Cicada Papers of 2018

Filed under: Papers and Documents — Dan @ 1:01 am

This page will feature a running list of cicada papers published in 2018. I’ll update it as the year progresses. 30 papers so far this year!

If a missed a paper, email me at cicadamania@gmail.com.

June

  1. Cicada fossils (Cicadoidea: Tettigarctidae and Cicadidae) with a review of the named fossilised Cicadidae. Author: M.S. Moulds. Link to paper.
  2. Recurrent symbiont recruitment from fungal parasites in cicadas. Author: Yu Matsuura, Minoru Moriyama, Piotr Lukasik, Dan Vanderpool, Takema Fukatsu. Link to paper.
  3. Changes in endosymbiont complexity drive host-level compensatory adaptations in cicadas. Authors: Matthew A Campbell, Piotr Łukasik, Mariah M Meyer, Mark Buckner, Chris Simon, Claudio Veloso, Anna Michalik, John P McCutcheon. Link to paper.
  4. Gradient wetting state for droplet transportation and efficient fog harvest on nanopillared cicada wing surface. Authors: Heng Xie, Han-Xiong Huang, Hao-Yang Mi. Link to paper.

May

  1. Case 3761 — Platypleurini Schmidt, 1918: Proposed precedence over Hamzaria Distant, 1905 to conserve nomenclatural stability in the Cicadidae (Insecta, Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadoidea). Authors: David C. Marshall, Max Moulds, Michel Boulard, Allen F. Sanborn, Anthony Ewart, Cong Wei, Kiran Marathe, Lindsay W. Popple, Benjamin W. Price and Chris Simon. Link to article.
  2. Sensing of Substrate Vibrations in the Adult Cicada Okanagana rimosa (Hemiptera: Cicadidae). Authors: Joscha A Alt, Reinhard Lakes-Harlan. Link to Paper.
  3. A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification. Authors: DAVID C. MARSHALL, MAX MOULDS, KATHY B. R. HILL, BENJAMIN W. PRICE, ELIZABETH J. WADE, CHRISTOPHER L. OWEN, GEERT GOEMANS, KIRAN MARATHE, VIVEK SARKAR, JOHN R. COOLEY, ALLEN F. SANBORN, KRUSHNAMEGH KUNTE, MARTIN H. VILLET, CHRIS SIMON. Link to paper.
  4. An Identification key to the species of Auchenorrhyncha of Iranian fauna recorded as pests in orchards and a review on the pest status of the species. Author: FARIBA MOZAFFARIAN. Link to paper.
  5. Two new genera and two new species of cicadas from Central America (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae). Author: ALLEN F. SANBORN. Link to paper.

April

  1. Cicadetta sibillae Hertach & Trilar, 2015, nouvelle espèce de cigale pour la France (Hemiptera, Cicadidae) et premières analyses des sons complexes émis durant la cymbalisation d’appel nuptial. Authors: Stéphane Puissant and Kevin Gurcel. Link to paper.
  2. Triplicate parallel life cycle divergence despite gene flow in periodical cicadas. Authors: Tomochika Fujisawa, Takuya Koyama, Satoshi Kakishima, John R. Cooley, Chris Simon, Jin Yoshimura & Teiji Sota. Link to paper.
  3. Revision of the cicada genus Dilobopyga (Hemiptera, Cicadidae) from Sulawesi and the Moluccas. Author: J.P. Duffels. Link to paper.
  4. Two new genera and five new species of Mugadina-like small grass cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettini) from Central and Eastern Australia: comparative morphology, songs, behaviour and distributions. Author: A Ewart. Link to paper.
  5. A flexible and stable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on Au nanoparticles/Graphene oxide/Cicada wing array. Authors: Guochao Shi, Mingli Wanga, Yanying Zhu, Lin Shen, Yuhong Wanga, Wanli Mac, Yuee Chen, Ruifeng Li. Link to paper.

March

  1. Two new species of Palapsalta (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) from Western Australia and Northern Territory. Authors: David Emery, Nathan Emery, P.M. Hutchinson. Link to paper.
  2. İzmir ilinde kiraz ağaçlarında zararlı Büyük ağustosböceği [Lyristes plebejus (Scopoli, 1763) (Hemiptera: Cicadidae)]’nin ergin çıkış seyri ve popülasyon yoğunluğunun belirlenmesi. Authors: Cevdet Kaplan, Serdar TEZCAN. Link to paper.
  3. Extension in its distribution range and a new record for the cicada genus Salvazana Distant, 1913 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cryptotympanii) from India. Authors: Sudhanya Ray Hajong, Rodeson Thangkiew. Link to paper.
  4. Spatially resolved chemical analysis of cicada wings using laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Authors: Jessica K. Román, Callee M. Walsh, Junho Oh, Catherine E. Dana, Sungmin Hong, Kyoo D. Jo, Marianne Alleyne, Nenad Miljkovic, Donald M. Cropek. Link to paper.
  5. Comparative analysis of microbial communities associated with bacteriomes, reproductive organs and eggs of the cicada Subpsaltria yangi. Authors: Dandan Wang, Zhi Huang, Hong He, Cong Wei. Link to paper.
  6. The cicada genus Procollina Metcalf, 1952 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae): redescription including fourteen new species, with a key to the species of the subtribe Dazina Kato, 1932 rev. stat., the description of the Aragualnini n. tribe, and one new combination. Author: Allen F. Sanborn. Link to Paper.

February

  1. Cicada parasitic moths from China (Lepidoptera: Epipyropidae): morphology, identity, biology, and biogeography. Authors: Yunxiang Liu, Zhaofu Yang, Guoyun Zhang, Qingqing Yu & Cong Wei. Link to paper.
  2. By land, air, and sea: hemipteran diversity through the genomic lens. Authors: Kristen A. Panfilio, David R. Angelini. Link to paper.
  3. Revision, phylogeny and phylogeography of the cicada genus Auritibicen (Hemiptera: Cicadidae), with descriptions of ten new species. Authors: Xu Wang, Masami Hayashi, Cong Wei. Link to paper.

January

  1. Urban heat island effect on cicada densities in metropolitan Seoul. Authors: Hoa Q. Nguyen, Desiree K. Andersen, Yuseob Kim, Yikweon Jang. Link to paper.
  2. Multiple origins of interdependent endosymbiotic complexes in a genus of cicadas. Authors: Piotr Łukasik, Katherine Nazario, James T. Van Leuven, Matthew A. Campbell, Mariah Meyer, Anna Michalik, Pablo Pessacq, Chris Simon, Claudio Veloso and John P. McCutcheon. Link to paper.
  3. Two New Species and Revised Species Status for Two Species of Ueana Distant, 1905 (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea: Cicadidae). Author: Allen F. Sanborn. Link to paper.
  4. A specialized fungal parasite (Massospora cicadina) hijacks the sexual signals of periodical cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Magicicada). Authors: John R. Cooley, David C. Marshall & Kathy B. R. Hill. Link to paper.
  5. Germalna, a new genus for the New Caledonian cicada previously assigned to the genus Melampsalta Kolenati, plus a complement to the description of the genus Rouxalna Boulard, with the description of two new species (Insecta: Hemiptera, Cicadoidea, Cicadidae). Author: Quentin Delorme. Link to paper.
  6. The distribution, morphology and some bioecological properties of Cicadatra platyptera Fieber, 1876 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) in Izmir province of Turkey. Authors: Cevdet Kaplan, Serdar Tezcan. Link to paper.
  7. A new genus and species of Cicada from Vietnam: Cochleopsaltria duffelsi gen. et sp. nov. (Hemiptera: Cicadomorpha: Cicadidae). Authors: Thai Hong Pham, Jérôme Constant. Link to paper.

Brood VII, the Onondaga Brood, Will Emerge in New York State in 2018

Filed under: Brood VII,Magicicada,Periodical — Dan @ 1:01 am

Update (June 17th): I just got back from Onondaga county and I can report that the emergence is in full swing. Lots of chorusing and mating. The best locations are around the Onondaga Nation reservation. If you visit, please do not trespass into the reservation — there are plenty of cicadas outside of it. John Cooley of Magicicada.org said there are also reports of cicadas in the Green Lakes State Park.

Here’s a video montage:

And a gallery:

Brood VII Magicicada septendecim 2018 Syracuse.

About Brood VII

Periodical cicadas (Magicicada septendecim, people call them “locusts”) will emerge in the Finger Lakes area of New York state in 2018.

This group of cicadas is called Brood VII (7) and is known as the Onondaga Brood. This brood is shrinking, and will likely be the next periodical cicada brood to go extinct

A pair of Magicicada septendecim:
A pair of mating Magicicada septendecims found in Woodbridge Township NJ

More details:

  • What: Brood VII is the smallest periodical cicada brood in the U.S., and is isolated in the Finger Lakes area of New York State. Only one species of cicada belongs to the brood: Magicicada septendecim (click link for sounds, video). This cicada has a 17-year life cycle. Sadly, Brood VII will likely be the next Brood to go extinct.
  • When: June, but perhaps May if it’s a very warm year. Magicicada cicadas typically emerge in the spring, once the soil underground where they live reaches approximately 64 degrees Faraihneght.
  • Where: the Finger Lakes area of NY State.
    • Where they appeared (last) in 2001: Onondaga and Livingston.
    • The following counties have had these cicadas in the distant past: Cayuga, Livingston, Monroe, Onondaga, Ontario, Seneca, Steuben, Wyoming, York.
  • The Onondaga Nation survived starvation one year by eating these cicadas

Further reading / viewing / listening:

Papers about Brood VII

  • The Historical Contraction of Periodical Cicada Brood Vii (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Magicicada by John R. Cooley, David C. Marshall and Chris Simon. J. New York Entomol. Soc. 112(2–3):198–204, 2004. Link to PDF download.
  • Decrease in Geographic Range of the Finger Lakes Brood(Brood Vii) of the Periodical Cicada (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Magicicada Spp.) by Cole Gilbert and Carolyn Klass. J. New York Entomol. Soc. 114(1–2):78–85, 2006.

June 19, 2018

Z. P. Metcalf Collection of Literature on Auchenorrhyncha

Filed under: Allen F. Sanborn,Papers and Documents — Dan @ 8:58 pm

Here is information about a research resource for Auchenorrhyncha researchers. I’m posting at the request of Lew Dietz and Allen F Sanborn.

Z. P. Metcalf Collection of Literature on Auchenorrhyncha

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to make you aware of an exciting resource that is available to you at the Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries in Raleigh, North Carolina.

The Zeno Payne Metcalf Entomology Research Collection is an outstanding resource for scholars. The link to the finding aid is here:

https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/findingaids/mc00220

And the link to the associated database for individual publications is here: http://metcalf.lib.ncsu.edu/metcalf/

If you would like to make an appointment to view any materials in person, or to request a copy of a publication remotely, please email us at: library_specialcollections@ncsu.edu

We typically need 2-3 business days to pull selected materials from off-site storage. More information about visiting the Special Collections Research Center can be found here: https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/scrc/using-materials

Finally, we are pleased to let you know that low-resolution copies (PDFs) only cost 50 cents per page, but, if you bring a camera (no flash allowed) or cell phone, you can take photographs at no cost in the Special Collections Reading Room. If you are unable to visit in person, we can still provide low-resolution copies (PDFs) to you for the fees outlined above. For security reasons, arrangements to pay using a major credit card (preferred) or bank transfer, should be made by telephone. Copyright law applies; see: https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/scrc/copyright

If you have any further questions about the Metcalf materials or copyright, please don’t hesitate to contact us at library_specialcollections@ncsu.edu

Sincerely, Gwynn Thayer, Acting Department Head, Special Collections Research Center (12 June 2018)

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