Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

May 12, 2020

Can you identify this cicada from Romania?

Filed under: Europe (Continent),Identify,Romania — Dan @ 7:40 pm

Can you identify this cicada from Bucharest, Romania?

These photos were taken by Tudor Sava. I’ve cropped them so you can get a closer view.

Since the cicada is in the process of molting/has just molted, it doesn’t have its final adult colors yet. There’s a good chance some of the brown, green and red/orange colors will be

Bucharest, Romania by Tudor Sava

Bucharest, Romania by Tudor Sava

Bucharest, Romania by Tudor Sava

May 1, 2019

Cicada Safari app for tracking Magicicada periodical cicadas

In the Brood IX (9) area? Researchers need your help! If you see a cicada, please report it using the Cicada Safari App 📱, available for Android and Apple phones.

One thing that is important to determine is whether any of the off schedule populations (especially the 4-year early and 4-year late ones) are large enough to persist and lay eggs. The big question is will they establish a new population? Please send photos of cicadas laying eggs. And if egg laying is extensive enough to damage branches, please send photos of that as well!

Mount St. Joseph University has released a new app called Cicada Safari. Its purpose is to help you identify periodical (Magicicada, 17-year, 13-year, “locusts”) cicadas, and share the location where you found them. Scientists like Dr. Gene Kritsky, of Mount St. Joseph University, will use the data to determine exactly where periodical cicadas exist, in order to create maps for future generations.

Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=edu.msj.cicadaSafari
iOS/Apple: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cicada-safari/id1446471492?mt=8

Judging by screenshots of the app, it looks like you can 1) identify cicadas, 2) take a photo and share it, 3) map the location where you found it, 4) compete with other cicada scientists for the most cicadas found. Looks that way at least.

Cicada Safari App

Cicada Safari App

The app lets you submit cicadas photos of any species.

Not in the eastern United States, and looking for an app to identify and report cicadas, other creatures, plants & fungi? Try the iNaturalist apps.

February 28, 2019

Can you identify this cicada from Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia? (Cryptotympana aquila)

Filed under: Cryptotympana,Cryptotympanini,Identify,Malaysia — Dan @ 1:01 am

cicada

Can you identify this cicada from Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia? The photo was taken by photographer Karim Madoya.

Update: here’s what it is: Cryptotympana aquila.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Cryptotympana
Species: Cryptotympana aquila (Walker, 1850)

More info about this cicada.

July 6, 2017

Cicada 3301 cicada compared to Distantalna splendida

Filed under: Distantalna,Identify,Pop Culture,Tosenini — Tags: , — Dan @ 9:08 pm

Today I took a fresh look at the 3301 Cicada image. In the past I thought it was a composition of multiple cicadas — and it still might be — but I now think it’s primarily a Distantalna splendida formerly Tosena splendida, a cicada found in southern Asia (China, India, Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, etc.). Distortions caused by embossing — or whatever filters they used — makes identifying the cicada difficult.

Here’s my comparison of the wings.

cicada 3301

I will probably do a comparison of the body and head at some point.

Here’s a photo of this Splendid cicada:
splendida

Specimens vary in appearance (size, wing patterns) from individual to individual — they all look similar, but they’re not exact matches. The process of spreading a specimen’s wings and preserving it can also alter its appearance, and introduce unnatural changes to the insect’s morphology.

Distantalna splendida are easy to find on eBay or taxidermy shops if you’re interested, although they’re often mislabeled using their former name Tosena splendida, or something totally different.

Bonus:

Here’s an illustration from A Monograph of Oriental Cicadas by W. L. Distant. 1889-1892. Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website:

3301 Cicada

April 27, 2016

Please use the correct imagery for 17 year cicadas

Filed under: Identify,Magicicada,Periodical,Video — Dan @ 1:01 am

If you’re writing an article about the coming emergence of the 17-year periodical cicadas, please use the correct genus & species of cicadas.

The genus of all 17-year cicadas is Magicicada, and they are never green. The three species of 17-year cicadas are Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini, and Magicicada septendecula. They’re all black with orange wings and legs and red eyes (some exceptions, but they’re never green). The four species of 13-year cicadas are Magicicada neotredecim, Magicicada tredecim, Magicicada tredecassini and Magicicada tredecula (also never green). More information about these species.

An adult Magicicada septendecim by Dan Mozgai/cicadamania.com:

Magicicada septendecim Brood VII 2018 09

An adult Magicicada septendecim by Dan Mozgai/cicadamania.com:

A newly emerged, teneral, Magicicada septendecim by Dan Mozgai/cicadamania.com:

17-year cicada video:

A singing Magicicada septendecim:

Singing Magicicada septendecim from Cicada Mania on Vimeo.

A Magicicada septendecim laying eggs:

Magicicada septendecim ovipositing from Cicada Mania on Vimeo.

A Magicicada septendecim up close (deceased):

Close up of a tymbal of a Magicicada septendecim from Cicada Mania on Vimeo.

Magicicada on a tree (mostly Magicicada cassini):

For the sake of cicada correctness, feel free to use them in your article. Just credit cicadamania.com.

If you are looking to license Magicicada images or HD Video, Roy Troutman has plenty of both. Reach out to him if interested. His images and video are tagged throughout the site.

Hundreds of shed cicada skins (exuvia) by Troutman:

Click/tap for a larger version:
2014 Ohio Exuvia Pile by Roy Troutman

Wrong Cicadas:

If the cicada you use in your article is green, it isn’t a 17-year cicada. I repeat: if the cicada is green it is not a 17-year cicada.

The cicada at the top of the Wikipedia page for cicadas is not a 17-year cicada, it’s an annual cicada called Neotibicen linnei:

Tibicen linnei
(photo credit for this Neotibicen linnei).

The cicada shedding its skin on a roll of paper towel… that’s not a 17-year cicada either:

Wikipedia
(Photo Credits for the molting cicada).

Looking for people to speak at a conference or “cicadacon”?

Need a speaker for a Cicada Convention or a Periodical Cicada Event? Try these folks:

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