Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

May 12, 2020

Can you identify this cicada from Romania?

Filed under: Europe (Continent) | Identify | Romania — Dan @ 7:40 pm

Can you identify this cicada from Bucharest, Romania?

These photos were taken by Tudor Sava. I’ve cropped them so you can get a closer view.

Since the cicada is in the process of molting/has just molted, it doesn’t have its final adult colors yet. There’s a good chance some of the brown, green, and red/orange colors will be

Bucharest, Romania by Tudor Sava

Bucharest, Romania by Tudor Sava

Bucharest, Romania by Tudor Sava

April 29, 2020

Magicicadas emerging early in 2020, Stragglers from other Broods

Filed under: Accelerations | Magicicada | Periodical Stragglers — Dan @ 6:56 pm

In 2020, the main periodical cicada brood expected to emerge in the U.S. is Brood IX (9). Brood IX will emerge in southern West Virginia, western Virginia, and a small portion of north-western North Carolina. This we know for sure.

If you want to see where cicadas are being reported, try the Cicada Safari App is available for Android and Apple devices .

OK, here’s the point of this article:

Surprise Stragglers

Cicadas from other broods will also emerge this year in small numbers. When cicadas emerge early or late, they’re called stragglers. Don’t get hung up on the meaning of the word. If it makes you happy, call the ones that emerge early “precursors”, “pioneers”, or “heralds”.

Members of Brood XIX (19) are emerging in parts of North Carolina and Georgia, where Brood XIX is know to exist. There’s some discussion of this over on the Cicada Discussion, Science and Study Group on Facebook. You might see them in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Lousiana, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

The rest of Brood XIX will emerge in 2024. Here’s a map.

Here’s a paper that discusses 13-year Magicicada emerging 4 years early: David C. Marshall, Kathy B. R. Hill, and John R. Cooley “Multimodal Life-Cycle Variation in 13- and 17-Year Periodical Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Magicicada),” Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 90(3), 211-226, (1 July 2017). https://doi.org/10.2317/0022-8567-90.3.211

Members of Brood XIII (13) are likely to emerge 4 years early in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and possibly Michigan.

The rest of Brood XIII emerge in 2024 (a big year for periodical cicadas). Here’s a map.

Some members of Brood X (10) should emerge 1 year early in Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington D.C.

The rest of Brood X will emerge next year in 2021. Here’s a map.

Here’s a screen shot from the Cicada Safari app:

May 30 map - Now with Brood V

Within the app, you can zoom in to see where the cicadas are appearing. Here’s a “Live Map” of the sightings from the app.Pinch and zoom to get details.

April 18, 2020

Davis’ Key to Species of the Genus Tibicen found in the Southeastern United States

Davis provided a key of cicadas that belong to the then genus Tibicen in his 1918 article Mississippi Cicadas, with a Key to the Species of the Southeastern United States from volume 26 of the Journal of The New York Entomological Society. Download it from archive.org. This guide works for the Northeast and Midwest as well.

Mississippi Cicadas

Since 1918, genus and some species names have changed, so I’m going to present the key here, with highlighted notes on the updated names + images (when I have them). I’ll try to replicate the formatting of the original document as best I can.

Here goes…

Key to Species of the Genus Tibicen found in the Southeastern United States [works for most states east of the Rocky Mountains].

Note: the cicadas in the key are now organized in three genera: Neotibicen (A B), Megatibicen (A BB), and Diceroprocta (AA).

A. Large, heavy-bodied species; head broad, uncus [male genitals] simple, and first cross vein in the fore wings starting from radius 3 far back or about one-third distant from base of the first marginal cell.

     B. Uncus longer than broad. Black species with green or greenish markings and black area on the central part of the abdomen beneath, except in sayi [sayi = Neotibicen tibicen tibicen], and new variety of davisi [new variety of davisi = Neotibicen davisi harnedi].

Note: this group of cicadas (B) are now organized under the genus Neotibicen, not Tibicen.

         C. Hind margin of pronotum or collar, green or greenish.

             A narrow irregular area of black on the under side of the abdomen; opercula short and broad, and usually in the males an attenuated, pruinose [frosty white] stripe each side on the dorsum of segment three … pruinosa (Say). [pruinosa = Neotibicen pruinosus pruinosus].

N. pruinosus

Neotibicen pruinosus pruinosus
photo by Paul Krombholz.

             Dorsum of abdomen with the hind margin of the segments more or less brown and generally but a trace of pruinose stripe each side on segment three … pruinosa var. winnemanna (Davis) [pruinosa var. winnemanna = Neotibicen winnemanna].

[Generally speaking, east of the Appalachian mountains, you’ll find Neotibicen winnemanna, and west, it’s Neotibicen pruinosus.]

Neotibicen winnemanna Garner NC
Photo of a Neotibicen winnemanna.

             Dorsum of abdomen shining black with a broad pruinose mark each side on segment three; blackened area on under side of abdomen more in the nature of an even stripe … pruinosa var latifasciata (Davis) [pruinosa var. latifasciata = Neotibicen latifasciatus].

             A longitudinal band of black on the under side of the abdomen, the opercula more lobate, and the margin of the front wings suddenly bent near the middle … linnei (Smith & Grossbeck) [linnei = Neotibicen linnei].

Neotibicen linnei
Photo of a Neotibicen linnei.

             A definite longitudinal band of black on the under side of the abdomen; head with the front rather prominent. Not a large species … canicularis (Harris) [canicularis = Neotibicen canicularis].

             An irregular band of black on the under side of the abdomen, head rounded in front; a rather small species … davisi (Smith & Grossbeck) [davisi = Neotibicen davisi davisi].

             Abdomen greenish centrally on under side, blackened area wanting, marginal cells of fore wings clouded … davisi var. harnedi new variety [davisi var. harnedi = Neotibicen davisi harnedi].

Krombholz Davisi compared
Photo by Paul Krombhold. Neotibicen davisi harnedi (left), Neotibicen davisi davisi (right).

        CC. Hind margin of pronotum or collar black or nearly so (except in sayi var. australis).

            D. Central area of the abdomen beneath black.

                 Opercula long and with the legs usually somewhat chest- nut colored ; the uncus when seen in profile forked, resembling the open mouth of a snake … similaris (Smith & Grossbeck) [similaris = Neotibicen similaris similaris].

                 Opercula much shorter, more rounded, and the black area on the under side of the abdomen in the nature of an even stripe. Uncus not forked … lyricen (De Geer) [lyricen = Neotibicen lyricen lyricen].

                 Blacker than typical lyricen, lacking the considerable amount of fulvous markings on the pronotum and mesonotum. A fulvous somewhat anchor-shaped mark centrally on the pronotum … lyricen var. engelhardti (Davis) [lyricen var. engelhardti = Neotibicen lyricen engelhardti].

            DD. Central area of the abdomen not black beneath, often pruinose, as well as the long opercula.

                 Collar black, often with a greenish spot each side near the outer angles. … sayi (Smith & Grossbeck) [sayi = Neotibicen tibicen tibicen].

                 Collar all green or nearly so, as well as the pronotum and mesonotum … sayi var. australis (Davis) [sayi = Neotibicen tibicen australis].

    BB. The uncus is broad at the base, triangular in shape, and generally about as broad as long. Opercula broad and rounded at the extremities no definite black area on the central part of the abdomen beneath, usually unicolorus.

Note: this group of cicadas (BB) are now organized under the genus Megatibicen, not Tibicen.

         E. Wings long and narrow, collar 2 mm. or less in breadth at central portions ; dorsum of abdomen black or nearly so.

             Basal cell of fore wings rusty in color, anal cells (membranes) of both pair of wings gray; usually expands 110 mm. or more … resonans (Walker) [resonans = Megatibicen resonans].

Neotibicen resonans photos by Joe Green from 2007, taken in Florida.
Photo of a Megatibicen resonans by Joe Green.

             Basal cell of fore wings often black or nearly so, anal cells of both pair of wings yellowish. Expands about 100 mm … figurata (Walker) [figurata = Megatibicen figuratus].

M. figurata
Photo of a Megatibicen figuratus by Paul Krombholz.

         EE. Wings broad, hind margin of the pronotum or collar green or greenish and more than 2 mm. broad.

             F. Anal cells or membranes at base of fore and hind wings gray.

                 Dorsal segments of the abdomen not margined with brown ; in fresh specimens the basal segments pruinose, also the terminal segments, leaving the four middle segments black. A large species expanding over 110 mm. … auletes (Germar) [auletes = Megatibicen auletes].

Megatibicen auletes, the largest cicada in North America
Photo of a Megatibicen auletes.

             FF. Anal cells or membranes at base of fore and hind wings light orange, two prominent marks on the mesonotum resembling the Hebrew letter resh inverted.

                 Fore wings with the first and second cross veins clouded, and the dorsum of the abdomen brownish or brownish black … resh (Haldeman) [resh = Megatibicen resh].

Megatibicen resh molting adult
Photo of a Megatibicen resh.

                 Fore wings with the first and second cross veins but faintly or not at all clouded and the abdominal segments margined posteriorly with brown. In fresh specimens there is usually a median row of white spots on the dorsum of the abdomen … marginalis (Walker) [marginalis = Megatibicen pronotalis walkeri].

Megatibicen pronotalis photo by Roy Troutman, taken in Batavia, Ohio
Photo of a Megatibicen pronotalis walkeri by Roy Troutman.

AA. Small species; wings starting from about the middle of the first marginal cell.

Note: this group of cicadas (AA) are now organized under the genus Diceroprocta, not Tibicen.

     G. First and second cross veins of fore wings clouded.

         Expanse of wings about 90 mm … biconica (Walker) [biconica = Diceroprocta biconica].

         Expanse of wings about 60 mm … olympusa (Walker) [olympusa = Diceroprocta olympusa].

Diceroprocta olympusa photos by Joe Green from 2007.
Photo of a Diceroprocta olympusa by Joe Green.

     GG. First and second cross veins of fore wings not clouded, wings clear throughout and expanding about 70 mm.

         Head rather large, front rounded, collar greenish or yellowish and contrasted in color rather sharply with the brown and black of pronotum and mesonotum … viridifascia (Walker) [viridifascia = Diceroprocta viridifascia].

         Head proportionately smaller than in the last ; front more pro- truding;- collar not so contrastingly colored and fore wings narrower … vitripennis (Say) [vitripennis = Diceroprocta vitripennis].


Diceroprocta vitripennis photo by Paul Krombholz.

and that’s all folks…

Brood IX (9) will emerge in 2020 in North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia

Filed under: Brood IX | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 1:03 am

Periodical cicada Brood IX (9) emerged in the spring of 2020 in North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia. The last time this brood emerged was in 2003. It will emerge again in 2037.

Researchers need your help! If you see a cicada, please report it using the Cicada Safari App , available for Android and Apple phones.

Brood IX is interesting to researchers because it’s located very close to 5 other broods. In a normal year, researchers would be able to drive the roads of the area and map the location of the brood so we can get data as to where the broods intersect, but because of the current situation in the U.S., most if not all researchers will be able to travel — so we need you to let us know where they’re at. Read more on Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org).

What, when, where, and why:

What:

Adult, Nymph, Molting Cicada

  • Cicada insects with a 17-year life cycle.
  • Some people call them “locusts” but they’re really cicadas.
  • Which species: All three 17-year species, Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini and Magicicada septendecula. How to tell the difference between the species.
  • NOT the green ones that arrive annually.

When: Typically beginning in mid-May and ending in late June. These cicadas will begin to emerge approximately when the soil 8" beneath the ground reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit (Heath, 1968). A nice, warm rain will often trigger an emergence.

Other tips: these cicadas will emerge after the trees have grown leaves, and, by my own observation, around the same time Iris flowers bloom.

Where:

  • Virginia municipalities: Blacksburg, Bland, Callands, Christiansburg, Covington, Dry Pond, Ferrum, Martinsville, Roanoke, Salem, Vinton, and more.
  • Virginia counties: Allegheny, Bland, Franklin, Henry, Montgomery, Patrick, Pittsylvania, Roanoke.
  • North Carolina municipalities: Chestnut Hill, Ennice, Francisco, Hays, Kernersville, McGrady, Millers Creek, Mt Airy, North Wilkesboro, Purlear, Thurmond, Westfield, and more.
  • North Carolina counties: Ashe, Alleghany, Forsyth, Stokes, Surry, Wilkes.
  • West Virginia municipalities: Camp Creek, Elmhurst, Hinton, Jumping Branch, Spanishburg, and more.
  • West Virginia counties: Fayette, Greenbrier, Mercer, Monroe, Pocahontas, Summers.

A quick tip using data from the Cicada Safari app team:

Cicadas in the north-west areas are Brood IX (red). Cicadas south & east of that area (purple) are Brood XIX emerging early.

Maps, Apps, and Tips:

Why: Why do they stay underground for 17-years? The prevailing research suggests they’ve evolved a long, 17-year lifecycle to avoid predators that can sync up with their lifecycle & emergence. Why are there so many?! Research suggests that their huge numbers allow them to overwhelm predators, so enough of them will live on to breed and perpetuate the brood.

More facts and fun:

1907 Map from Marlatt, C.L.. 1907. The periodical cicada. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology.

The larger dots are valid. Tiny dots, no. See a modern map, or the Live Map from the Cicada Safari app.
Marlatt 1907 09 Brood IX

Brood XIII (13) will emerge in 2024 in Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin and Indiana

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 1:02 am

Periodical cicada Brood XIII (13) will emerge in the spring of 2024 in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and possibly Michigan. The last time this brood emerged was in 2007.

Special note: Brood XIX (19) will also emerge in 2024. While the two broods do not overlap, they come closest in the Springfield, Illinois area.

What, when, where, and why:

What:

Millions of these:
Adult, Nymph, Molting Cicada

Videos from 2009:

When: Typically beginning in mid-May and ending in late June. These cicadas will begin to emerge approximately when the soil 8 inches beneath the ground reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit. A nice, warm rain will often trigger an emergence.

Other tips: these cicadas will emerge after the trees have grown leaves, and, by my own observation, around the same time Iris flowers bloom.

Where:

Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org) has the most up-to-date maps.

  • Illinois places: Belvidere, Brookfield, Channahon, Chicago, Des Plaines River Trail, Downers Grove, Egermann Woods County Forest Preserve, Elmhurst, Flossmoor, Geneva, Glen Ellyn, Highland Park, Hinsdale, Homewood, La Grange, Lagrange Woods, Lake Forest, Lansing, Lincolnshire, Lisle, Lombard, MacArthur Woods Forest Preserve, Marseilles, McHenry, McKinley Woods, Morton Arboretum, Naperville, Northbrook, Ogden, Ottawa, Palos Heights, River Forest, River Grove, Romeoville, Ryerson Woods, Schiller Park, Thornton, Vernon Hills, Villa Park, Weaton, Western Springs, Westmont, Wonder Lake, and more.
  • Illinois counties: Bureau, Carroll, Cass, Cook, DuPage, Fulton, Grundy, Henderson, Henry, Jo Daviess, Kankakee, Lake, LaSalle, Livingston, Logan, Marshall, Mason, McHenry, McLean, Menard, Peoria, Putnam, Sangamon, Stark, Tazewell, Whiteside, Will, Winnebago, Woodford.
  • Iowa places: Atalissa, Solon, and more.
  • Iowa counties: Benton, Black Hawk, Bremer, Cedar, Dubuque, Henry, Iowa, Johnson, Jones, Linn, Louisa, Muscatine, Scott, Tama.
  • Wisconsin locations: Aurora University, Big Foot Beach State Park, Lake Geneva, Moraine Nature Preserve, and more.
  • Wisconsin counties: Crawford, Grant, Green. Rock, Walworth.
  • Indiana locations: Crown Point, Portage, Purdue-North Central, Valparaiso, and more.
  • Indiana counties: LaPorte, Porter, Lake.
  • Michigan: According to Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org), Magicicada have been found along the border of Michigan and Indiana.

More Location Tips:

Local Events

Lake County Forest Preserve in Illinois: 1) A cicada exhibit opening at the Dunn Museum in Libertyville, IL on April 27th. 2) Cicadas of Lake County on 5/2. 3) Celebrating Cicadas on 5/16. 4) On Sunday, June 9th, they plan to hold CicadaFest at Ryerson Woods. Insects, and of course, cicadas will be featured.

Why: Why do they stay underground for 17-years? The prevailing research suggests they have evolved a long lifecycle allowing them to avoid predators that would sync up with their lifecycle & emergence. Why are there so many?! Research suggests that their huge numbers allow them to overwhelm predators, so enough of them will live on to breed and perpetuate the brood.

More facts and fun:

1907 Map from Marlatt, C.L.. 1907. The periodical cicada. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology.

See a modern map, or the Live Map from the Cicada Safari app.
Marlatt 1907 13 Brood XIII

What was the emergence in 2007 like?

April 15, 2020

Common Cicadas of North America

Filed under: Canada | North America (Continent) | United States — Dan @ 6:34 pm

This is a list of the most well-known cicadas in North America.

See one of these cicadas in 2023?
Join this 2023 North American Annual Cicada Location Project on iNaturalist and report it.

Annual Cicada Species

These cicadas appear ever year.

Cacama valvata (Uhler, 1888)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - valvata - Adam Fleishman
©Adam Fleishman.

  • Short Name: C. valvata
  • Common Name: Common Cactus Dodger
  • Locations: AZ, CA, CO, KS, NV, NM, OK, TX, UT
  • When: May-June, peaking in June.
  • Eyes: beige and black mix
  • Collar: black with gold highlights
  • Description: Black with gold highlights and white pruinose.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Cicadettana calliope calliope (Walker, 1850)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - calliope - Paul Krombholz
©Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: C. calliope calliope
  • Common Name: Southern Grass Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CO, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MS, MO, NE, NC, OH, OK, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA
  • When: May-August, peaking in July.
  • Eyes: pink, beige, green
  • Collar: rust, brown
  • Description: Small. Black and brown.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Diceroprocta apache (Davis, 1921)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - apache - Adam Fleishman
© Adam Fleishman


Diceroprocta olympusa (Walker, 1850)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - olympusa - Joe Green
© Joe Green.

  • Short Name: D. olympusa
  • Common Name: Olympic Scrub Cicada
  • Locations: AL, FL, GA, MS, NC, SC
  • When: June-August. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: brown?
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Black, brown and green with white pruinose.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Diceroprocta vitripennis (Say, 1830)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - vitripennis - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: D. vitripennis
  • Common Name: Green Winged Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MI, MS, MO, NE, OK, TN, TX, WI
  • When: June-August. Peaks in July.
  • Eyes: green
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Black with green and brown and white pruinose.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen auletes (Germar, 1834)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Auletes - Dan

  • Short Name: M. auletes
  • Common Name: Northern Dusk Singing Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MA, MI, MS, MO, NE, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV, WI
  • When: June-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: gray / beige
  • Collar: olive or rusty brown
  • Description: The largest North American cicada. Olive green to rusty brown with black, tan, and white coloring. Heavy white pruinose. M on mesonotum is typically partially occluded by pruinose. Sings at dusk.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen dealbatus (Davis, 1915)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - dealbatus - Bill Reynolds collection

  • Short Name: M. dealbatus
  • Common Name: Plains Cicada
  • Locations: CO, IA, KS, MT, NE, NM, ND, OK, SD, TX, WY
  • When: June-October. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: beige
  • Collar: light orange or olive
  • Description: Primarily either orange/rust or pea green, brown, or black with heavy pruninosity which forms distinct markings on the dorsal side of the body. The dorsal side has two black stripes framed by three areas of pruinosity. Sounds like N. pronotalis.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen dorsatus (Say, 1825)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - dorsatus - Bill Lesar
© Bill Lesar

  • Short Name: M. dorsatus
  • Common Name: Bush Cicada or Grand Western or Giant Grassland Cicada
  • Locations: AR, CO, ID, IL, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE, NM, OK, SD, TX, WY
  • When: July-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: beige to brown
  • Collar: light orange
  • Description: Rust/orange, black & white pruinosity, which forms distinct markings, such as a line of white dots down the dorsal side of the abdomen. Sounds like N. tremulus. Has a call that sounds like a rapid series of clicks.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen figuratus (Walker, 1858)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - figuratus - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: M. figuratus
  • Common Name: Fall Southeastern Dusk-singing Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX, VA
  • When: August-October. Peaks in September.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: brown
  • Description: Black and browns. White pruinosis.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen pronotalis walkeri Metcalf, 1955

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Walkers - Roy Troutman
© Roy Troutman

  • Short Name: M. pronotalis walkeri
  • Common Name: Walker’s Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NC, ND, OH, OK, SD, TN, TX, VA, WV, WI, WY
  • When: July-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: gray
  • Collar: green or brown
  • Description: Tan or pea green, brown, black, and sometimes white pruinose. Wing color matches the dominant color of the body. Typically lacks a black marking on its pronotum.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen resh (Haldeman, 1852)

©Insect Singers.
Thumbs - Resh - Bill Reynolds collection

  • Short Name: M. resh
  • Common Name: Resh Cicada
  • Locations: AR, KS, LA, MS, NE, OK, SC, TN, TX
  • When: May-October. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: varies
  • Collar: olive
  • Description: Black, green and brown camo pattern. White pruinosis. Resh Hebrew character pattern on mesonotum.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Megatibicen resonans (Walker, 1850)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - resonans - Joe Green
© Joe Green

  • Short Name: M. resonans
  • Common Name: Southern Resonant/Great Pine Barrens Cicada
  • Locations: AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX, VA
  • When: May-October. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: brown
  • Description: Brown, black & white pruinosity distinctively present within curves of the cruciform elevation.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neocicada hieroglyphica hieroglyphica (Say, 1830)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - hieroglyphica - Joe Green
© Joe Green

  • Short Name: N. hieroglyphica hieroglyphica
  • Common Name: Hieroglyphic Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MS, MO, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA
  • When: May-August. Peaks in June.
  • Eyes: varies
  • Collar: varies
  • Description: Black, brown and green patterns.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen canicularis (Harris, 1841)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Dog Day - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: N. canicularis
  • Common Name: Dog-day Cicada
  • Locations: AR, CT, DC, IL, IN, IA, KS, ME, MB, MD, MA, MI, MN, MO, NE, NB, NH, NJ, NY, NC, ND, NS, OH, ON, PA, PE, QC, RI, SC, SD, TN, VT, VA, WV, WI
  • When: July-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: varies
  • Collar: varies
  • Description: Typical black, brown, beige and green Tibicen camo patterns. The primary color varies from brown to green. The collar is often a mix of green & black. Sounds like an angle grinder tool and like N. auriferus & N. davisi.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen davisi davisi (Smith and Grossbeck, 1907)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - davisi - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: N. davisi davisi
  • Common Name: Davis’ Southeastern Dog-Day Cicada
  • Locations: AL, DE, DC, FL, GA, LA, MD, MA, MS, NJ, NY, NC, PA, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV
  • When: August-December. Peaks in September.
  • Eyes: varies
  • Collar: brown or green
  • Description: The davisi comes in a wide variety of colors: from rusty browns to greens. A crown-like pattern on the mesonotum. Sounds like an angle grinder tool, & sounds like N. auriferus & N. canicularis.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen latifasciatus (Davis, 1915)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Latifasciatus - Bill Reynolds collection

  • Short Name: N. latifasciatus
  • Common Name: Coastal Scissor(s) Grinder Cicada
  • Locations: FL, MD, NJ, NC, VA
  • When: August-October. Peaks in September.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: brown or green
  • Description: If the cicada has a white X on its back, it is a latifasciatus. Repetitive, rhythmic, call like someone repeatedly running a scissor over a grinding wheel.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen linnei (Smith and Grossbeck, 1907)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Linnei - Tom Lehmkuhl
© Tom Lehmkuhl

  • Short Name: N. linnei
  • Common Name: Linne’s Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NJ, NY, NC, OH, ON, PA, SC, TN, VT, VA, WV, WI
  • When: July-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: dark brown
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Black, green and some brown camo pattern. Prominent M. Bend in its wing. Sounds like N. tibicen.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen lyricen engelhardti (Davis, 1910)

Thumb - Dark Lyric - Roy Troutman
© Roy Troutman

  • Short Name: N. lyricen engelhardti
  • Common Name: Dark Lyric Cicada
  • Locations: AL, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IN, IL, KY, MD, MA, MS, NJ, NY, NC, OH, PA, RI, SC, TN, VA, WV
  • When: July-September. Peaks in July.
  • Eyes: black
  • Collar: black
  • Description: The Dark Lyric Cicadas have the darkest coloration of all the Lyric cicadas. Their mesonotum is almost entirely dark brown/black. They have a “soda-pop pull-tab” or keyhole shape on their pronotum.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen lyricen lyricen (De Geer, 1773)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Lyric - Dan

  • Short Name: N. lyricen lyricen
  • Common Name: Lyric Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MA, MI, MS, MO, NE, NH, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, ON, PA, RI, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV, WI
  • When: June-August. Peaks in July.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: black
  • Description: The Lyric cicada, like most small Neotibicen, has a green, black & brown camouflage look, but the key is Lyric cicadas typically have black collars. Its sound is like an angle grinder tool steadily grinding a slightly uneven surface.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen pruinosus pruinosus (Say, 1825)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Pruinosa - Paul Krombholz
© Paul Krombholz

  • Short Name: N. pruinosus pruinosus
  • Common Name: Scissor(s) Grinder
  • Locations: AL, AR, CO, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NC, OH, OK, PA, SC, SD, TN, TX, WV, WI
  • When: June-October. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: black
  • Collar: green
  • Description: The Scissor Grinder looks a lot like Linne’s Cicada but its wing doesn’t have the bend that Linne’s Cicada has. The Scissor Grinder also seems to have more of an orange coloration to the ‘arches’ on its mesonotum.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen superbus (Fitch, 1855)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Superb - Sloan Childers
© Sloan Childers

  • Short Name: N. superbus
  • Common Name: Superb Dog-Day Cicada
  • Locations: AR, KS, LA, MO, NM, OK, TX
  • When: June-August. Peaks in July.
  • Eyes: black
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Green with black mask and yellow arches on back.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen tibicen tibicen (Linnaeus, 1758)


Thumb - Chloromera - Dan

  • Short Name: N. tibicen tibicen
  • Common Name: Swamp Cicada, Morning Cicada
  • Locations: AL, AR, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MA, MI, MS, MO, NE, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OK, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, VT, VA, WV, WI
  • When: June-September. Peaks in August.
  • Eyes: black or dark green
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Swamp Cicadas are are known for their rounded, humped back. Their coloration varies from mostly black & some green to black, brown, and green. Their collar is usually black but can include green.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Neotibicen winnemanna (Davis, 1912)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - winnemanna - Dan

  • Short Name: N. winnemanna
  • Common Name: Eastern Scissor(s) Grinder
  • Locations: DE, DC, GA, MD, NC, NJ, PA, SC, VA
  • When: June-September. Peak in September.
  • Eyes: dark green
  • Collar: green
  • Description: Like the Scissor Grinder, the Eastern Scissor Grinder seems to have more of an orange hue to the arches on its mesonotum, perhaps even more so than the Scissor Grinder.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Okanagana bella Davis, 1919

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Bella - Matt Berger
© Matt Berger

  • Short Name: O. bella
  • Common Name: Mountain Cicada
  • Locations: AB, AZ, BC, CA, CO, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, SD, UT, WA, WY
  • When: June-July. Peaks in June.
  • Eyes: black
  • Collar: orange
  • Description: Black with orange highlights.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Okanagana canadensis (Provancher, 1889)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - canadensis - Les Daniels
© Les Daniels

  • Short Name: O. canadensis
  • Common Name: Canadian Cicada
  • Locations: AB, BC, CA, CO, ID, ME, MB, MI, MN, MT, NB, NH, NY, NT, OH, ON, OR, PA, QC, SK, SD, UT, VT, WI
  • When: June-July. Peaks in June.
  • Eyes: dark gray
  • Collar: black and beige
  • Description: Black with beige highlights.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Okanagana rimosa rimosa (Say, 1830)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Rimosa - Natasha
© Natasha

  • Short Name: O. rimosa rimosa
  • Common Name: Say’s Cicada
  • Locations: AB, BC, CA, CT, ID, IL, IN, IA, ME, MB, MD, MA, MI, MN, MT, NV, NB, NH, NJ, NY, ND, OH, ON, OR, PA, QC, SD, UT, VT, VA, WA, WI, WY
  • When: May-July. Peaks in June.
  • Eyes: n/a
  • Collar: n/a
  • Description: n/a
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Pacarina puella Davis, 1923

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Puella - John Beard
© John Beard


Quesada gigas (Olivier, 1790)

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - Gigas - Leonardo Milhomem
© Leonardo Milhomem

  • Short Name: Q. gigas
  • Common Name: Giant Cicada
  • Locations: TX
  • When: Always out somewhere in the Americas. Peaks in July.
  • Eyes: brown
  • Collar: brown to green
  • Description: The second largest North American cicada. Black, green, and brown camo patterns.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Periodical Cicadas

These cicadas have 17 or 13-year life cycles. Visit the Periodical Cicada Information Page for when and where.

Magicicada cassinii (Fisher, 1852)


Thumb - cassini - Dan

  • Short Name: M. cassini
  • Common Name: Cassini Periodical Cicada or 17-Year Cicada
  • Locations: GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MD, MO, NC, NE, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, TN, TX, VA, WI, WV
  • When: May-June. Peaks in June. Every 17 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000

©Insect Singers.
Thumb - neotredecim - Dan

  • Short Name: M. neotredecim
  • Common Name: 13 Periodical Cicada or 13-Year Cicada or John and David’s Cicada
  • Locations: AR, IA, IL, IN, KY, MO, TN
  • When: May-June. Peaks in June. Every 13 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on the abdomen. Orange between eye and wing.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758)


Thumb - Septendecim - Dan

  • Short Name: M. septendecim
  • Common Name: Decim Periodical Cicada or Linnaeus’s 17-Year Cicada or 17-Year Cicada
  • Locations: CT, DC, DE, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MA, MD, MI, MO, NC, NE, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, SC, TN, VA, WI, WV
  • When: May-June. Peaks in June. Every 17 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on the abdomen. Orange between eye and wing.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

© Joe Green.
Thumb - septendecula - Dan

  • Short Name: M. septendecula
  • Common Name: Decula Periodical Cicdada or 17-Year Cicada
  • Locations: GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MO, NC, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, TN, VA, WV
  • When: May-June. Peaks in June. Every 17 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on the abdomen.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962


Thumb - tredecassini

  • Short Name: M. tredecassini
  • Common Name: 13-Year Cicada or 13-Year Cassini
  • Locations: AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA
  • When: May-June. Peaks in June. Every 13 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868)

©Insect Singers
Thumb - tredecim - Dan

  • Short Name: M. tredecim
  • Common Name: 13-Year Cicada or 13-Year Decim
  • Locations: AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA
  • When: May-June. Peaks in June. Every 13 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on the abdomen. Orange between eye and wing.
  • More info, photos, sounds, video and references


Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962


Thumb - tredecula - Dan

  • Short Name: M. tredecula
  • Common Name: 13-Year Cicada or 13-Year Decula
  • Locations: AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA
  • When: May-June. Peaks in June. Every 13 years.
  • Eyes: reddish orange
  • Collar: black
  • Description: Black body with orange wings and legs. Orange stripes on the abdomen.
  • >More info, photos, sounds, video and references



Related Resources

Most sound files are Copyright of Insect Singers.

Maps: Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico [PDF]

Didn’t find what you’re looking for? Try these websites about the cicadas of North America, or these blog posts about United States and Canada.

Click the images for larger versions, the species name, and the name of the photographer.

April 14, 2020

Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

Filed under: Lamotialnini | Magicicada | Periodical | United States — Tags: — Dan @ 8:50 pm

Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

Magicicada tredecula 2014 Ohio

Song type: Chorus


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. tredecula

Song type: Call


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. tredecula

Song type: Call


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. tredecula

Identification Tips

Smaller than M. neotredecim & M. tredecim. Orange stripes on its abdomen, through not as much as M. neotredecim & M. tredecim. Its chorus sounds like a ticking clock. Very similar to the 17-year M. septendecula.

Video Playlist

Playlists contain multiple videos found on YouTube.

Brood Chart

Magicicada tredecula has a 13-year lifecycle.

Brood Year States
XIX (19) 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024 AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, VA
XXII (22) 1975, 1988, 2001, 2014, 2027 KY, LA, MS, OH
XXIII (23) 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028 AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, TN

Name, Location and Description

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Subtribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org).
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al.A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification.Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1—64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868)

Filed under: Lamotialnini | Magicicada | Periodical | United States — Tags: — Dan @ 8:30 pm

Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868).

Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868)
Photo credit: by Dan Mozgai. Ohio.

All Magicicada tredecim information and images on cicadamania.com.

Song type: Call


Source: ©Insect Singers | Species: M. tredecim

Identification tips:

Similar to M. neotredecim, but the abdomen is typically more orange — these species overlap in limited areas, in which M. tredecim maintains the normal pitch of its call, and M. neotredecim raises its pitch. Read more on Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org). Larger than M. tredecassini and M. tredecula.

Brood chart

Magicicada tredecim has a 13-year life cycle.

Brood Year States
XIX (19) 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024 AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, VA
XXII (22) 1975, 1988, 2001, 2014, 2027 KY, LA, MS, OH
XXIII (23) 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028 AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, TN

Name, Location and Description

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Subtribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868)

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org)
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al.A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification.Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1—64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962

Filed under: Lamotialnini | Magicicada | Periodical | United States — Tags: — Dan @ 8:09 pm

Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962.

Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962
Photo credit: by Dan Mozgai

All Magicicada tredecassini information and images on cicadamania.com.

Song type: Call


Source: ©Cicada Mania | Species: M. tredecassini

Identification Tips

Its abdomen is black. Its chorus sounds like hissing static. It is smaller than M. neotredecim and M. tredecim. It is very similar to the 17-year M. cassinii species.

Brood Chart

Magicicada tredecassini has a 13-Year lifecycle.

Brood Year States
XIX (19) 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024 AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, VA
XXII (22) 1975, 1988, 2001, 2014, 2027 KY, LA, MS, OH
XXIII (23) 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028 AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, TN

Name, Location and Description

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Sub-Tribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org).
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al.A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification.Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1—64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000

Filed under: David Marshall | John Cooley | Lamotialnini | Magicicada | Periodical | United States — Tags: — Dan @ 7:36 pm

Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000.

Maybe a Magicicada neotredecim in Illinois

Song type: Call


Source: ©Insect Singers | Species: M. neotredecim

Video Playlist

Playlists contain multiple videos found on YouTube.

Identification Tips

Thick orange stripes on the abdomen. Orange between the eye and wing insertion. In the few areas it overlaps with M. tredecim, M. neotredecim sings with a higher pitch. Read more on Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org). It is similar to the 17-year species M. septendecim.

Brood Chart

Magicicada neotredecim has a 13-year life cycle.

Brood XIX (19)

XIX (19)
Years: 1972, 1985, 1998, 2011, 2024
Locations: AR, IL, IN, KS, KY, MO, OK

XXIII (23)

XXIII (23)
Years: 1976, 1989, 2002, 2015, 2028
Locations: AR, IL, IN, KY, MO

Name, Location and Description

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Lamotialnini
Subtribe: Tryellina
Genus: Magicicada
Species: Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org).
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.
  5. Tribe information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al.A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification.Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1—64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

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