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July 19, 2014

A Diceroprocta apache (Davis, 1921) from Las Vegas

Filed under: Diceroprocta — Tags: — by @ 3:11 pm

One cool thing about being a cicada fan is your friends will send you cicadas from their part of the world. This male Diceroprocta apache cicada is courtesy of my friend Shannon, who lives in Las Vegas, NV. They’re out in large numbers from June to July.

Dorsal view of a male Diceroprocta apache from Las Vegas, NV.

Ventral view of a male Diceroprocta apache from Las Vegas, NV.

Diceroprocta apache, aka the Citrus cicada, is the only member of the Diceroprocta genus that lives in Nevada. It can also be found in Arizona, California, Colorado and Utah.

Here is a playlist of YouTube videos to watch if you want to hear what they sound and look like when they’re still alive:

If you’re in Las Vegas and hear an electrical buzzing sound, it might be a Citrus cicada.

January 1, 2014

North American Cicada Websites

These sites contain information about both periodical and annual cicada species:

  1. Visit Tim McNary’s Bibliography of the Cicadoidea for many, many cicada papers and articles.
  2. Insect Singers. A new site from David Marshall and Kathy Hill featuring dozens of cicada song samples from North America.AUDIO PHOTOS
  3. "http://hydrodictyon.eeb.uconn.edu/projects/cicada/">Cicada
    Central
    (uconn.edu) One of the premier cicada sites. Many pictures, maps and information. Superb Magicicada information. PHOTOS MAPS
  4. Singing Insects of North America (ufl.edu) A large site featuring lists of North American species and audio files. PHOTOS AUDIO
  5. Bug Guide (bugguide.net) A massive site devoted insect identification, including an abundance of cicada photos and information. You’ll find Cacama, Diceroprocta, Magicicada (Periodical Cicadas), Neocicada, Neoplatypedia, Okanagana, Pacarina, Platypedia, Tibicen, Beameria and Okanagodes. PHOTOS
  6. >Massachusetts Cicadas (www.masscic.org) tremendous cicada site packed with information
    and photos. Dozens of pages of information. Tibicens, Magicicada, Cicada Killer wasps. PHOTOS
  7. Gene Kritsky’s Web Site (msj.edu) Gene Kritsky is one of the worlds foremost cicada researchers. Book him for your next cicada event.
  8. Cicadas of the Mid-Atlantic (cicadas.info) Sighting information for Magicicada and annual cicadas in the Mid-Atlantic region. Yearly cicada reports are available. PHOTOS
  9. Cicada
    Hunt
    (saltthesandbox.org) Lots of information and photos. Cicada Hunt is a great site for families interested in cicada hunting and study. PHOTOS
  10. Checklist of Cicadas of Kansas (windsofkansas.com) A list of species you’ll find in Kansas, references, photos and illustrations. PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONS
  11. Guide
    d’identification d’insectes du Quebec
    (lesinsectesduquebec.com) En Francais. Canicularis and Okanagana rimosa info and photos. PHOTOS AUDIO
  12. "http://alpha.fdu.edu/~boyer/Entomology_folder.html/Entomology.html">Professor Paul S. Boyer’s Cicada page (fdu.edu) Features Magicicada photos, information and audio files. ILLUSTRATIONS AUDIO
  13. Homoptera: cicadas, hoppers, & aphids (ltreadwell.ifas.ufl.edu) Information about the Homoptera order, photos and illustrations. PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONS
  14. Insect Images (insectimages.org) About 150 North American cicada photos, including Magicicada, Tibicen, Okanagana, and Cacama. PHOTOS
  15. Gordon’s Cicada Page (earthlife.net) A photo and about 10 printed pages worth of solid cicada information. PHOTOS
  16. "http://insects.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/fauna/michigan_cicadas/">The University of Michigan Cicada Pages (ummz.lsa.umich.edu) The premier North America cicada site, until Cicada Central and Magicicada.org came around. Magicicada, Tibicen, Okanagana, Diceroprocta. PHOTOS AUDIO MAPS

Magicicada

  1. Magicicada.org is devoted to monitoring emergences and providing Magicicada information. AUDIO PHOTOS MAPS
  2. "http://www.biosurvey.ou.edu/okwild/misc/percicada.html">Periodical Cicada (biosurvey.ou.edu)
    A few photos. PHOTOS
  3. Periodical Cicada (umassgreeninfo.org) Many nice photos depicting the cicada’s life cycle, and good information. PHOTOS
  4. Periodical Cicadas (biology.clc.uc.edu) A fun and informative periodical cicada page with many excellent photos, recipes and 19 paragraphs of information. PHOTOS
  5. Return of the Cicada! Serious information mixed with humor and silly illustrations. (whyfiles.org) PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONS
  6. Seventeen Year Cicada (seventeenyearcicada.com) Dozens of Magicicada photos and info. PHOTOS

Tibicen

  1. Annual Cicadas of Arkansas (angelfire.com) Photos and information about Tibicen robinsonianus (formerly T. robinsoniana), Tibicen dorsatus (formerly T. dorsata), Tibicen pruinosus (formerly T. pruinosa), Tibicen lyricen, Tibicen davisi, Tibicen auletes, & Tibicen aurifera. PHOTOS

Diceroprocta

  1. Apache cicada, Diceroprocta apache (fireflyforest.net) A photo and 3 paragraphs of information. PHOTOS
  2. This page features a summary of the Diceroprocta species

Platypedia

  1. "http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05590.html">Colorado State Univerity Extension cicada
    page
    (colostate.edu) Includes a picture of Putnam’s cicada and a paragraph of information within 3 pages of various information about cicadas. PHOTOS

April 9, 2013

Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico

Download the PDF here: www.cicadamania.com/downloads/diversity-05-00166.pdf.

We are excited to announce the availability of a document by Allen F. Sanborn and Polly K. Phillips titled Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico. This document features distribution maps for North American cicada species! This document is an excellent companion to The Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea: Cicadidae) of North America North of Mexico by Allen F. Sanborn and Maxine S. Heath (link to that book).

Abstract: We describe and illustrate the biogeography of the cicadas inhabiting continental North America, north of Mexico. Species distributions were determined through our collecting efforts as well as label data from more than 110 institutional collections. The status of subspecies is discussed with respect to their distributions. As we have shown over limited geographic areas, the distribution of individual species is related to the habitat in which they are found. We discuss the biogeography of the genera with respect to their phylogenetic relationships. California is the state with the greatest alpha diversity (89 species, 46.6% of taxa) and unique species (35 species, 18.3% of taxa). Texas, Arizona, Colorado and Utah are the states with the next greatest alpha diversity with Texas, Arizona and Utah being next for unique species diversity. Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island are the states with the least amount of cicada diversity. Diversity is greatest in states and areas where there is a diversity of plant communities and habitats within these communities. Mountainous terrain also coincides with increases in diversity. Several regions of the focus area require additional collection efforts to fill in the distributions of several species.
Keywords: cicada; distribution; Diceroprocta; Tibicen; Okanagana; Okanagodes; Cacama; Magicicada; Platypedia; Cicadetta

An example of a map from the document:

Example Map

May 24, 2010

Diceroprocta olympusa calling

Filed under: Diceroprocta,Joe Green,Video — Tags: — by @ 5:48 pm

Joe Green reported that the Diceroprocta olympusa have started calling in Southwest Florida (Lehigh Acres).

Here’s some video featuring their song:

D. olympusa cicada stops when approached in Lehigh by Joe Green

D. olympusa cicada stops when approached in Lehigh by Joe Green.

D. olympusa starting call by Joe Green

D. olympusa starting call by Joe Green.

D. olympusa chorus from cage by Joe Green

D. olympusa chorus from cage by Joe Green.

D. olympusa pre ticks before calling by Joe Green

D. olympusa pre ticks before calling by Joe Green.

January 9, 2010

Diceroprocta alarm call

Filed under: Diceroprocta,Joe Green,Video — by @ 3:15 pm

D. olympusa alarm call by Joe Green

D. olympusa alarm call by Joe Green.

D. olympusa cicada alarm call by Joe Green

D. olympusa cicada alarm call by Joe Green.

January 8, 2010

Diceroprocta olympusa (Walker, 1850)

Filed under: Diceroprocta — Tags: — by @ 5:11 am

Diceroprocta olympusa aka the Scrub Cicada can be found in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

Diceroprocta olympusa

Diceroprocta viridifascia (Walker, 1850)

Filed under: Diceroprocta,Video — Tags: — by @ 5:01 am

Diceroprocta viridifascia aka the Salt Marsh Cicada can be found in AL, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.

These videos feature the call of the D. viridifascia.

May 27, 2008

New galleries: Neocicada hieroglyphica, Diceroprocta olympusa and Tibicen resonans

Thanks to Cicada Mania friend Joe Green we now have 3 new cicada galleries featuring cicadas we didn’t have before one the site: Neocicada hieroglyphica, Diceroprocta olympusa and Tibicen resonans.

This is a Neocicada hieroglyphica:
Neocicada hieroglyphica by Joe Green, 2007

Hang in there, we’ll be back to the 17 Year Cicadas tomorrow.

July 11, 2007

New Adam Fleishman’s Diceroprocta apache gallery

Filed under: Diceroprocta — Tags: — by @ 7:30 pm

Enjoy this gallery of Diceroprocta apache photos by Adam Fleishman.

Diceroprocta apache

May 28, 2007

Diceroprocta vitripennis. out in Mississippi

Filed under: Diceroprocta,Paul Krombholz — Tags: — by @ 9:34 am

Here’s a break in the Magicicada mania: a Diceroprocta vitripennis. This photo was taken by Cicada Mania regular Paul Krombholz in Jackson Mississippi just last week. Cicadas like Diceroprocta vitripennis are annual cicadas: they emerge each year in small numbers, and as you can see, they rely on camouflage for survival. Annual cicadas are also quite shy compared to the periodic Magicicadas — they have very different life strategies. American annual cicadas rely on stealth and cunning to survive while searching for a mate. Periodic cicadas rely on the fact that there are so many of them, that some will always survive to carry on the species.

Diceroprocta vitripennisDiceroprocta vitripennis

Notes from Paul:

I am continuing this season to try to get pictures of all the cicadas in the
Jackson, Mississippi area. I just got a female specimen of Diceroprocta
vitripennis. I found it in low vegetation on a sand bar next to the Pearl
River. Thanks to John Davis and the collectors at the Mississippi Museum of
Science for the tip on where to look for them! From head to wing tips, it
is 38 mm, but the wings of this species are longer in relation to body
length than those of Tibicens. Body length of this vitripennis was only
22mm.

More Diceroprocta vitripennis photos from Paul.

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