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December 15, 2018

Diceroprocta alacris & Diceroprocta apache

Diceroprocta alacris & Diceroprocta apache are two cicadas, both found in Mexico. I’m covering them both in the same post because they were both formerly refrered to as Cicada transversa.

Diceroprocta apache

D. apache was formerly known as Cicada transversa.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genera: Diceroprocta
Species: Diceroprocta apache (Davis, 1921)

D. apache, aka Citrus Cicada, is also found in the southern United States. Visit this page to listen to its song.

D. apache have triangle-shaped opercula.

Cicada transversa illustration from Insecta. Rhychota. – note the shape of the triangular shape of the opercula:

A photo of D. apache from my collection. Same/similar cicada? Maybe, maybe not. Note the opercula:

Diceroprocta alacris

There are two subspecies: D. alacris alacris (Stål, 1864) and D. alacris campechensis Davis, 1938.

Diceroprocta alacris was formerly known as Cicada alacris as well as Cicada transversa.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
SubFamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
SubTribe: Cryptotympanina
Genera: Diceroprocta
Species: Diceroprocta alacris
Subspecies: D. alacris alacris (Stål, 1864)
Subspecies: D. alacris campechensis Davis, 1938

Two varieties of Cicada alacris – note the rounded shape of the operculum:

References:

  1. The illustration comes from Biologia Centrali-Americana. Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Vol. 1. By W. L. Distant F.E.S. and The Rev. Canon W. W. Fowler, F.L.S. (1881-1905). Read it on the Biodiversity Heritage Library website.
  2. Species name verification comes from Allen Sanborn’s Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha).

August 23, 2018

Cordyceps infected Citrus Cicadas

Filed under: Cordyceps,Diceroprocta — Tags: — Dan @ 9:44 am

Here’s another fungi story coming from the WVU Kasson Lab: Cordyceps infected Citrus Cicadas (Diceroprocta apache).

The story goes like this: because of Ed Yong’s article about the Massospora fungus that infects cicadas, someone sent the Kasson Lab photos, and then samples, of Diceroprocta apache (Citrus Cicadas) infected with a different type of fungus: Cordyceps. Looks like the lab is going to study this fungus, and I’m sure they’ll produce a paper.

July 19, 2014

A Diceroprocta apache (Davis, 1921) from Las Vegas

Filed under: Diceroprocta — Tags: — Dan @ 3:11 pm

One cool thing about being a cicada fan is your friends will send you cicadas from their part of the world. This male Diceroprocta apache cicada is courtesy of my friend Shannon, who lives in Las Vegas, NV. They’re out in large numbers from June to July.

Dorsal view of a male Diceroprocta apache from Las Vegas, NV.

Ventral view of a male Diceroprocta apache from Las Vegas, NV.

Diceroprocta apache, aka the Citrus cicada, is the only member of the Diceroprocta genus that lives in Nevada. It can also be found in Arizona, California, Colorado and Utah.

Here is a playlist of YouTube videos to watch if you want to hear what they sound and look like when they’re still alive:

If you’re in Las Vegas and hear an electrical buzzing sound, it might be a Citrus cicada.

July 11, 2007

New Adam Fleishman’s Diceroprocta apache gallery

Filed under: Diceroprocta — Tags: — Dan @ 7:30 pm

Enjoy this gallery of Diceroprocta apache photos by Adam Fleishman.

Diceroprocta apache

August 2, 2006

It’s an Apache, not a Magicicada… or mabe an semicinta

Filed under: Diceroprocta — Tags: , — Dan @ 6:10 pm

Update: Gerry from Massachusetts Cicadas site said that this is a Diceroprocta semicinta, not an apache.

Kathy Hill had this to say

It could be apache or it might be semicincta, depending on where he got it from. But from the pics/specimens we have I think it does look more like apache. We’ve never noticed one with red eyes either but then Dave and I have only collected apache and semicincta once in 2003, so we haven’t seen very many. I don’t know of any other Diceroproctas that it could be. Apache/semicincta are very common in parts of Arizona. I think they are parapatric.

Bill Sheridan has contributed this excellent photo of an Apache cicada, often confused with Magicicadas because of the red eyes and black body.

Apache