Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

February 4, 2021

Aside from Brood X, what else is happening with cicadas in the U.S.

Filed under: Magicicada | Periodical | Periodical Stragglers — Dan @ 9:21 pm

Aside from Brood X, what else is happening in terms of Periodical cicadas?

  • Expect some early-emerging cicadas from Brood XIV, showing up 4 years early. Brood XIV exists in Georgia, Kentucky, Indiana, Massachusettes, Maryland, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia.
  • There might be some 1-year stragglers form Brood IX. Brood IX is in North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.
  • There might be some 4-year stragglers from Brood VI. Brood VI is found in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Oklaholma. And Ohio?Brood VI is a weird one.

January 24, 2021

70,000 Magicicada cicadas = one adult American?

Filed under: Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 11:12 pm

I was wondering how much an adult Magicicada weighs. According to Richard Karban’s paper “Transient habitats limit development time for periodical cicadas,” a female Magicicada septendecim weighs approximately 1.2 grams. (Karban, R. (2014), Transient habitats limit development time for periodical cicadas. Ecology, 95: 3-8. https://doi.org/10.1890/13-1518.1)

According to the CDC website, the average adult American human weighs 84051 grams.

That means the average adult weighs as much as 70,043 Magicicada cicadas.

Image unrelated:
Godzilla vs Cicada

Cicadas @ UCONN, a new Cicada website

Filed under: John Cooley | Magicicada | Periodical | United States — Dan @ 9:12 pm

Magicicada.org was an amazing website filled with information about Magicicada periodical cicadas and backed by cicada expert, John Cooley.

The site now has a new address and look: Cicadas @ UCONN (https://cicadas.uconn.edu/). Bookmark it in preparation for the 2021 Brood X emergence.

Cicadas @ UCONN

UCONN (University of Connecticut) has other cicada websites such as The Simon Lab and Cicada Central.

January 16, 2021

Three new species of cicadas from Meghalaya, India

Filed under: Dundubiini | India | Mata | Vivek Sarkar — Dan @ 9:45 pm

Three new species of cicadas have been discovered in Meghalaya, India:
Mata meghalayana, Mata lenonia, and Mata ruffordii.

Mata cicadas  Vivek Sarkar
Photo courtesy of Vivek Sarkar.

Access the paper on Research Gate or Zootaxa Vol 4908, No 1.

Paper title: Description of three new species of the genus Mata Distant, 1906 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Oncotympanini) with notes on their natural history from the Indian state of Meghalaya, India

Authors: Vivek Sarkar, Cuckoo Mahapatra, Pratyush P. Mohapatra, Manoj V. Nair, Krushnamegh Kunte

Abstract: “Three new species of the Asian genus Mata Distant, 1906 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) viz. Mata lenonia sp.nov.; Mata ruffordii sp.nov. and Mata meghalayana sp.nov. are described from the Indian state of Meghalaya. Keys and taxonomic descriptions of these species are provided with detailed accounts of their natural history and acoustics.”

January 9, 2021

Periodical cicada Brood X (10) will emerge in 15 states in 2021

Filed under: Brood X | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 1:01 am

Brood X 2021

Brood X emerged in Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York (not yet extinct), Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington D.C. Report them with the Cicada Safari app. Use the hashtag #BroodX or #BroodXCicadas on social media.

LATEST NEWS:

Enjoy this video from 2021:

12/27/21: Dr. Gene Kritsky’s retrospective on the 2021 Brood X emergence has been published on the America Entomologist website.

In the news:

Interesting merch:

Articles about Brood X, a retrospective:

What, when, where, and why:

What are these cicadas?

Billions of these insects:

Adult, Nymph, Molting Cicada

  • Black, orange and red Cicada insects with a 17-year life cycle.
  • Some people call them “locusts” but they’re really cicadas.
  • Which species: All three 17-year species, Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini and Magicicada septendecula. How to tell the difference between the species.
  • NOT the green ones that arrive annually.

When will these cicadas emerge:

Typically beginning in May and ending in late June. These cicadas will begin to emerge approximately when the soil 8" beneath the ground reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit. A nice, warm rain will often trigger an emergence. Back in 2004, people began reporting emergences around May, 13th, but if the weather is warmer, it might start in late April. Update: in 2021, they started in Tennessee on 4/27.

Other tips: these cicadas will emerge after the trees have grown leaves, and, by my own observation, around the same time Iris flowers bloom:

Magicicada on an iris flower in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi

Magicicada on an iris flower in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi

Where will these cicadas emerge:

Cicadas @ UCONN has the most up to date map. If you see a cicada and want to report it, the Cicada Safari App is available for Android and Apple devices .

Here’s my list from 2004. Green highlight means adults have emerged in 2021!

Delaware:

Delaware counties: Kent, New Castle, Sussex.

Delaware places: Newark, Wilmington.

Georgia:

CICADAS CHORUSING IN GEORGIA

Georgia counties: Gilmer, Murray, Union, White, .

Georgia places: Blairsville, Blue Ridge, Chatsworth, Ellijay, Fort Mountain State Park, Norcross.

Illinois:

Brood X Illinois

Illinois counties: Edgar, Clark, Cook, Crawford, Vermilion.

Illinois places: Marshall, Park Forest, University Park.

Indiana:

Brood X Indiana

Indiana counties: Brown, Clark, Clay, Columbus, Crawford, Daviess, Dearborn, Dubois, Fountain, Gibson, Greene, Jackson, Jefferson, Jennings, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Orange, Owen, Parke, Perry, Pike, Ripley, Spencer, Sullivan, Vanderburgh, Vigo, Warrick, Waveland, Washington.

Indiana places: Aurora, Bloomington, Brookville, Clinton Falls, Dillsboro, Fishers, French Lick, Henryville, Indianapolis, Lawrenceburg, Lexington, Martinsville, McCormick’s Creek State Park, Nashville, New Pelkin, North Vernon, Salem, Skiles Test Park, Spencer.

Kentucky:

Brood X 2021 Kentucky

Kentucky counties: Boone, Breckenridge, Bullitt, Carroll, Daviess, Gallatin, Grayson, Hardin, Henry, Jefferson, Livingston, La Rue, McLean, Muhlenberg, Nelson, Ohio, Oldham, Trimble.

Kentucky places: Big Bone Lick State Park, Covington, Dayton, Dry Ridge, Eastview, Florence, Ft. Thomas, Georgetown, Grand Rivers, Hebron, Highland Heights, Louisville, Newport, Villa Hills.

Maryland:

Brood X 2021 Maryland

Maryland counties: Allegany, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, Garrett, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince Georges, Washington.

Maryland places: Abingdon, Annapolis, Aspen Hill, Baltimore (learn about the Baltimore Cicada Art project), Bel Air, Beltsville, Berwyn Heights, Bethesda, Bowie, Brooklandville, Brooklyn Park, Catonsville, Chevy Chase, Clarksville, Clinton, Colesville, College Park, Columbia, Cockeysville, Crofton, Cumberland, District Heights, Eldersburg, Elkridge, Elkton, Ellicott City, Fair Hill, Fallston, Forestville, Four Corners, Gaithersburg, Gambrills, Germantown, Glen Burnie, Glenelg, Greenbelt, Gwynn Oak, Hagerstown, Hanover, Havre De Grace, Hillcrest Heights, Hunt Valley, Hyattsville, Hydes, Jessup, Kensington, Landover Hills, Laurel, Linthicum, Loch Raven watershed, Lutherville, Odenton, Oella, Onley, Owings Mills, Pikesville, Potomac, Randallstown, Reisterstown, Riverdale, Rockville, Severna Park, Sharpsburg, Silver Spring, Takoma Park, Timonium, Towson, Travilah, Wheaton, Woodbine.

Want a FREE cicada book? In the DC area? Visit Lulu Florist, 4801 St. Elmo Ave., Bethesda, MD, and ask for a free copy of Cicada: Exotic Views by Davy Shian.

Michigan:

Michigan counties: Hillsdale, Washtenaw.

Michigan places: Ann Arbor, Canton, Quincy.

New Jersey:

Brood X 2021 New Jersey

New Jersey counties: Burlington, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Salem, Somerset, Warren.

New Jersey places: Alexandria, Allerton, Annandale, Asbury, Belle Mead, Bethlehem Township, Berkeley Heights, Bloomsbury, Browns Mills, Carpentersville, Clinton, Clinton Township, Cranbury, Delaware Township, East Amwell Township, Flemington, Franklin Park, Franklin Township (Somerset), Franklin Township (Warren), Frenchtown, Greenwich Township, Grover’s Mill, Hampton, Harmony, Hillsborough Township, Holland Township, Hopewell Township, Kendall Park, Kingston, Kingwood Township, Lambertville, Lawrence, Lebanon, Merrill Creek Reservoir, Milford, Montgomery, Monmouth Junction, Morristown, Mt. Rose, Pennington, Perryville, Phillipsburg, Plainsboro Township, Pittstown, Pohatcong Township, Princeton, Princeton Junction, Princeton Meadows, Prallsville, Raritan Township, Raven Rock, Readington Township, Ringoes, Rosemont, Rocky Hill, Skillman, Sourland Mountain, South Brunswick Township, Stanton, Stewartsville, Stockton, Union Township (Hunterdon), Voorhees Corner, West Windsor Township.

There’s an abundance of large parks and natural areas around Princeton.

New York (Long Island):

New York counties: Suffolk (but extinct, or nearly so, but still look for themNewsday article).

New York places: All on Long Island, but based on the 2004 emergence, they might be extinct. Some were seen in East Setauket, Connetquot River State Park, Ronkonkoma, Stony Brook. In 1987 they were seen in Shirley, Ronkonkoma, Bohemia, Connetquot River State Park, Oakdale, and Setauket.

In Long Island? Please read this article!.

North Carolina:

North Carolina counties: Buncombe, Cherokee, Surry, Wilkes.

North Carolina places: Apex, Elkin, Morganton, Murphy, Roaring River, Weaverville.

Ohio:

Brood X 2021 Ohio

Ohio counties: Butler, Clermont, Defiance, Franklin, Greene, Hamilton, Logan, Montgomery.

Ohio places: Amelia, Anderson Twp, Battelle Darby Park, Batavia, Bellbrook, Camden, Centerville, Cincinnati, Columbus, Defiance, Delaware, Delhi Twp, Dublin, Fairfield, Galloway, Hamilton, Kettering, Lewisburg, Lockland, Miamisburg, Olmsted Falls, Oxford, Paint Creek State Park, Springfield, St. Bernard, West Carrollton, West Chester.

Pennsylvania:

Brood X 2021 Pensy
Pennsylvania counties: Adams, Bedford, Berks, Bucks, Chester, Columbia, County, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Lancaster, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Mercer, Montgomery, Northampton, Perry, Schuylkill, Somerset, York.

Pennsylvania places:Archbald, Artemas, Bedford, Carroll Valley, Coopersburg, Dinosaur Rock, Downingtown, Erwinna, Gettysburg, Green Lane, Kintnersville, Lake Nockamixon, Lancaster, Lititz, Lumberville, Malvern, Mertztown, Metal Township, Mohnton, Mt Gretna, New Hope, Oaks, Oley, Perkasie, Perkiomenville, Phoenixville, Pipersville, Pittston, Plumstead Township, Point Pleasant, Quakertown, Red Lion, Roaring Spring, Solebury Township, Spring Mount, Stewartstown, Tinicum Township, Topton, Uhlerstown, Upper Black Eddy, Warwick Park, Williams Township.

Special note for folks in the Philly area: Is Philly Being Snubbed Again?.

Tennessee:

Tennessee

Tennessee counties: Blount, Greene, Hamblen, Hamilton, Jefferson, Knox, Polk, Roane, Sumner, Washtington, Wilson.

Tennessee places: Benton, Copperhill, Farragut, Fayetteville, Knoxville, Oak Ridge, Powell, Signal Mountain.

Virginia:

Virginia is for Cicadas.

Virginia counties: Arlington, Clarke, County, Dulles Smithsonian National Aircraft and Space Museum, Fairfax, Fauquier, Frederick, Loudoun, Shenandoah, Warren, Winchester.

Virginia places: Alexandria, Annandale, Arlington, Ashburn, Centreville, Chantilly, Clearbrook, Del Ray, Doswell, Dunn Loring, Fairfax, Falls Church, Franconia, Gore, Hampton Roads, Haymarket, Herndon, Lorton, Lovettsville, Manassas, McLean, Merrifield, Oakton, Reston, Springfield, Sterling, Vienna, White Post, Winchester.

West Virginia:

Brood X 2021 West Virginia800

West Virginia counties: Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, Morgan.

West Virginia places: Inwood, Martinsburg, New Creek, Paw Paw.

Washington D.C.

DC Brood X

Washington D.C. places: Washington D.C.

Want a FREE cicada book? In the DC area? Visit Lulu Florist, 4801 St. Elmo Ave., Bethesda, MD, and ask for a free copy of Cicada: Exotic Views by Davy Shian.


More Location Tips:

Example Emergence Timeline

This is an example of a typical cicada emergence. The exact dates will depend on the weather and density of the emergence in your location. Hot weather means an early start and quicker finish to the season — cool weather means a later start, and a protracted season.

Example Emergence Timeline

Here’s an Excel version of the chart. Feel free to use it and adjust it to match your experience.

Or watch the video version:

Some interesting things to look for

Adult Brood II Magicicada septendecim from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi Lean why many cicada wings are striveled up or damaged.
Massospora Learn about the Massospora cicadina fungus they share.
white eyes Look for cicadas with blue, white or other colored eyes.
Mosaic pigment Look for Mosaic pigment disorders.

Why do cicadas:

Why do they stay underground for 17-years? The prevailing research suggests they’ve evolved a long, 17-year lifecycle to avoid predators that can sync up with their lifecycle & emergence. Why are there so many?! Research suggests that their huge numbers allow them to overwhelm predators, so enough of them will live on to breed and perpetuate the brood.

Should you plant?

If you’re planting trees, wait until July. If your yard doesn’t get cicadas by the first week of June, it’s probably safe to plant in June. It’s the egg-laying that does damage. Talk to an arborist or tree expert if you’re actually concerned. I can’t answer your questions.

More facts and fun:

1907 Map from Marlatt, C.L.. 1907. The periodical cicada. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology.

Things have changed since 1907. See the modern UConn Cicada Map, or the Live Map from the Cicada Safari app.
Marlatt 1907 10 Brood X

Leave a comment below, or join the Cicada Discussion & Science Group on Facebook.

January 1, 2021

The Philacicada Society

Filed under: Charles Remington | Chris Simon | Cicada Mania | Folklore | Gene Kritsky | Ivan Huber — Tags: — Dan @ 12:38 pm

The Philacicada Society existed for a brief time (to my knowledge) in the 1990s. There was at least one mail (NOT email) newsletter (I’ll eventually photocopy it).

The information here is over 20 years old — don’t try to join. ūüôā

Here’s the original information:

I’m excited to announce the formation of the Philacicada Society. Cicada maniacs, please read on! (Special thanks to Dr. Ivan Huber and Charles Remington.)

“The huge scientific and public enthusiasm for Magicicada Brood II this year included some queries about a simple organization (and newsletter) devoted toMagicicada and perhaps other cicadas (around 4,000 species are known worldwide).In response, I agreed to do some initial organizational work, and Professor IvanHuber, of Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey, volunteered to edit a cicada newsletter.”

“You are hereby invited to become a charter member of this relatively informal society. You will join by sending to Treasurer Kritsky $5.00 as dues, to cover any minimal expenses.”

“The Newsletter would be perhaps quarterly and would contain anything appropriate, certainly including:”

  1. suggestions for observations and experiments
  2. brief reports of interesting findings (full scientific papers to be published of course in the usual formal journals)
  3. suggestions and plans for producing greatly needed book(s) on cicadas for the respected “intelligent layman”, including children, and for the entomological world (maybe a rush Magicicada Manual with a few different specialists doing different chapters); Gene Kritsky, Tom Moore, and Monte Lloydhave books moving toward publication; Magicicadais arguably the most biologically remarkable insect (even animal or organism?) in the world; the superb new Williams & Simon review is a basic reference and bibliography
  4. requests for research help — livestock, etc.
  5. planning for observing forthcoming hatches– Brood III, IV, etc.

“To emphasize a serious commitment to the Society and to organize mutual input, there is a need for informal charter officers and directors. I took the liberty of asking leading Magicicada workers to serve on such a Board, and they agreed. Sucha Board is as follows:

Chairman: Chris Simon
Treasurer: Gene R. Kritsky
Editor: Ivan Huber

Directors:
James & Maxine Health
Edward Johnson
Richard Karban
Monte Lloyd
Chris T. Maier
Thomas E. Moore
Charles L. Remington
Allen F. Sanborn
Kimberly G. Smith
Kathy S. Williams

In the future, more formality may be wanted in choosing officers and directors, including some cicada workers outside the U.S.A.

Please send Gene Kritsky names and addresses of possible members, to be circularized.

Cordially,
Charles Remington

Here is the form for joining the society. Print it out and mail it in.

old Philacicada society form

Dan’s Cicada Diary for 1996

Filed under: Brood II | Cicada Mania | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 12:05 pm

Here’s something I wrote in 1996 to chronicle the Brood II cicada emergence in 1996. It’s probably meant to be semi-humorous.

Dan’s Cicada Diary for 1996.

Sunday, May 19th: Metuchen, New Jersey; I found the first desiccated cicada nymph exoskeleton on my patio. My cat disappears.

Tuesday, May 21st: I found about 40 nymph exoskeletons on my patio, a pine tree, and a maple tree. I also spotted an adult climbing the maple and two crippled adults rolling about the base of the tree.

Wednesday, May 22nd: Bonanza! I found about 500 adults perched on just about everything in my yard: trees, patio furniture, the foundation of my home, the garden hose, garbage cans, the missing cat’s water dish, my hair…just plain everywhere! Gruesome!

Saturday, May 25th: Avenel, New Jersey; Party at the Ritzow’s. Literally, hundreds of adult cicadas perched high above in oak trees sneer at decadent humans sipping martini’s, playing croquet. Bourgeois homo sapiens…bah humbug!

Thursday, May 30th: Metuchen, New Jersey; Still no sign of the cat. Sitting outside on my patio around 8:30 pm I hear a “snap”, “crackle” and “popping” sound. Rice Crispies? No. More like cicadas nymphs crawling out of their holes and onto my garden wall to molt into adulthood. Not the loveliest sight.

Saturday, June 1st: Westfield, New Jersey; Dave Wilson and Claire Adas’ wedding. A beautiful ceremony and reception, with the exception of the 9000 uninvited cicadas: crawling up people’s legs, crunching underfoot, landing in refreshments…a moment to cherish and remember!

Tuesday, June 4th: North Edison, New Jersey; The cicadas have begun to sing! All together they sound like a Boeing 767 is circling 40 feet overhead. The sound is that awesome. 10 inch deep piles of dying post-coitus adults litter the base of trees. The invasion has only begun!

Wednesday, June 5th – Monday, June 17th: Metuchen, North Edison, Colonia, Avenel, New Jersey; The invasion is in full effect! Homeowners in North Edison and Colonia report having to haul away the dying bodies of cicadas inwheelbarrows! Residents describe the cicadas’ combined mating screams as “loud as a UFO” [how do they know what a UFO sounds like?] and “like a Mack Truck was floating ten foot above your head”! Someone even told me cicadas taste like shrimp! I guess they made the best of a bad situation.

Wednesday, June 26th: Metuchen, New Jersey; It appears the invasion is over. All that remains is the dismembered, rotting corpses and the memories, sweet, sweet, memories. But remember, They’ll be back…in the year 2013!

Saturday, August 3rd: Metuchen, New Jersey; Looking out my second-story window I can clearly see the damage done by the 17-year cicadas. Brown patches of dead leaves speckle local oak and maple trees, revealing the branches where the female cicada has chosen to lay her eggs; an interesting “natural disaster”, but, not as heart-breaking as an earthquake or a flood. Clearly, the most provocative news regarding cicadas is the current hatch of annual cicadas, which are larger than the “17-year” cicadas (thoroughly illustrated within this web page) and greener. Another dissimilarity is the difference in their respective mating calls: while the “17-year” cicada makes a whirring sound somewhere between the motor of a vacuum cleaner and a car alarm, the “annual” cicada sounds more like a lawn sprinkler or maybe a sewing machine. Although I can clearly hear hundreds of “annual” cicadas and I have found their shells, I haven’t visually located a single one! Another cicada-related event has been the recent hatch of “cicada killer” wasps. These two-inch long giant wasps only prey upon, our friend, the defenseless cicada. I haven’t located these creatures either, but, they are definitely out there. Cicadas beware!

Wednesday, August 26th: Metuchen, New Jersey; the Tibicen cicadas continue to sing…

Wednesday, November 6th: Metuchen, New Jersey; they are all dead or sucking on roots underground.

The 17-Year Cicada – Something I wrote in 1997

Filed under: Cicada Mania | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 12:00 pm

This is from my “Cicada Humor” page from 1996-1997. It’s semi-humorous. For serious information visit the facts-only 17-year cicada page.

The 17-Year Cicada

Every 17 years a fearsome biological monstrosity drags its way to the surface of the earth. It comes only to mate and spawn; however, it imparts terror and disgust in the hearts and minds of every man, woman, child, and beast unfortunate enough to cross its path. This is no Hollywood fantasy, ladies and gentlemen, this creature is real, horribly real! Cast your trembling eyes upon mother nature’s most disturbing insectoid aberration…T

he Cicada a.k.a. “The 17-Year Locust”
July 17th, 1997

Seriously, folks, the cicada isn’t a locust, it’s, well, a cicada (a member of the Homoptera order of insects). These charming creatures are best known for their intense mating call, which sounds more or less like a lawn sprinkler, or a miniature AH-64 Apache Black Helicopter. When 10,000 or so of these suckers start screaming in your neighborhood you’ll think you’re in the middle of Apocalypse Now. Nowisthe time! Depending on where you live, these heinous herbivores should be dive-bombing your friends and family any day now.

Actually, they are more likely tofallout of a tree thanfly, but, rest assured, they will be landing somewhere on your body sometime soon.

Ilive in central New Jersey and right now we are up to our mandibles in a plague of these sap slurping oddities. Some breeds, including the green/yellow striped cicadas, rear their ugly heads every year, but, fortunately not in great numbers. The “periodic”, black-bodied, red-eyed, spawn of Beelzebub cicadas only present themselves once every 17 years;unfortunately,there are literally millions of them. Worst of all, they have a face, just like you or me!

Periodic cicadas live to be 17 years old (13 years in southern states), which means they’re the only insect that qualifies for a driver’s license in New Jersey. Actually, these creatures only spend two to four weeks of their lives as an adult. They spend the first 17 years underground sucking on roots! Exciting! Once the adults have mated, the female drills a hole in a tree branch with her butt (technically her ovipositor) and lays her eggs. The eggs soon hatch and the “nymphs” fall to the ground where they feed on root sap. As soon as the adults mate they croak and drop to the ground where they will decay and stink. If I were you I wouldn’t hang out under any trees this year. In the end, your best offense will be a shovel and a bucket, or, a hungry golden retriever.

December 28, 2020

Cicada Research Published in 2020

Filed under: Papers and Documents — Dan @ 11:46 pm

2020 was quite a year. In spite of everything going on in the world, plenty of cicada research was published. Around 40 in all.

Below you will find a list organized by month. If I missed any, please email me at cicadamania@gmail.com. Here are the pages for 2019, 2018, and 2017.

December

Title: Cytogenetic characterization of periodical cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Magicicada)
Authors: Gayane Karagyan, Natalia Golub, Teiji Sota
Journal: Eur. J. Entomol. 117: 474-480, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14411/eje.2020.050

Title: Phylogeography of Ryukyu insular cicadas: Extensive vicariance by island isolation vs accidental dispersal by super typhoon
Authors: Soichi Osozawa, Kenichi Kanai, Haruo Fukuda, John Wakabayashi
Journal: bioRxiv
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.12.10.419127
Notes: Not peer reviewed yet.

November

Title: A new genus and three new species of South African Cicadettini (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae)
Authors: Allen F. Sanborn, Martin H. Villet.
Journal: Zootaxa, Vol 4885, No 4.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4885.4.7

Title: The cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of Ecuador including the description of five new species, a new subtribe, four new synonymies, and fifteen new records
Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Zootaxa Vol 4880, No 1
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4880.1.1

Title: The cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of Suriname including the description of two new species, five new combinations, and three new records
Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Zootaxa Vol 4881, No 3
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4881.3

October

Title: A revision of the Australian cicada genus Punia Moulds, 2012 (Cicadidae: Cicadettinae: Cicadettini) with the description of four new species.
Author: M.S. Moulds.
Journal: Zootaxa, Vol 4860, No 1.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4860.1.5

Title: A new species of Okanagana from the Walker Lane region of Nevada and California (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae)
Author: Will Chatfield-Taylor, Jeffrey A. Cole
Journal: Zootaxa, Vol 4868, No 4
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4868.4.3

Title: A New Species of Herrera Distant, 1905 (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae: Carinetini) from Panama with New Records for Two Additional Species
Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, 122(4):907-915 (2020).
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4289/0013-8797.122.4.907

Title: Checklist and provisional atlas of singing cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of Bulgaria, based on bioacoustics
Author: Tomi Trilar, Ilia Gjonov, Matija Gogala
Journal: Biodiversity Data Journal, 8.e54424
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.8.e54424

September

Title: N-Acetyldopamine derivatives from Periostracum Cicadae and their regulatory activities on Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation
Authors: Punam Thapaa, Ye Gua, Yun-Seo Kil, Su Cheol Baek, Ki Hyun Kim, Ah-Reum Han, Eun Kyoung Seo, Hyukjae Choi, Jae-Hoon Chang, Joo-Won Nam
Journal: Bioorganic Chemistry, Volume 102
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bioorg.2020.104095

Title: Two new species of Neotropical cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae) from southeastern Brazil
Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Journal of Insect Biodiversity, Vol 19, No 1
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12976/jib/2020.19.1.3

Title: Predator avoidance leads to separate emergence cycles in the protoperiodical Okanagana magnifica Davis, 1919 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae)
Author: Will Chatfield-Taylor
Journal: The Pan-Pacific Entomologist, 96(3):135-141 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3956/2020-96.3.135

Title: Cicadas of Portugal, those musicians which give joy during summer: towards a better knowledge of their Natural History and Conservation
Author: J. A. Quartau
Journal: Naturae Digital, Revista de Cultura Cient√ɬ≠fica do Museu Virtual da Biodiversidade da Universidade de √Čvora, 10 Setembro de 2020.
Link: Cigarras de Portugal, esses m√ļsicos estivais que animam o ver√£o com as suas melopeias: para um melhor conhecimento da sua hist√≥ria natural e conserva√ɬß√£o.

August

Title: Ecological indices of phytophagous Hemiptera and their natural enemies on Acacia auriculiformis (Fabales: Fabaceae) plants with or without dehydrated sewage sludge application in a degraded area
Authors: Luan Rocha Dourado, Germano Le√£o Demolin-Leite, Marcus Alvarenga Soares, Gustavo Leal Teixeira, Farley William Souza Silva, Regynaldo Arruda Sampaio, Jose Cola Zanuncio, Jesusa Crisostomo Legaspi
Journal: PLoS ONE 15(8): e0237261
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0237261

Title: The cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of Trinidad and Tobago including the description of three new species and seven new records, with new records for several additional Caribbean Islands
Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Zootaxa Vol 4838, No 4
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4838.4

Title: Reassessment of the cicada fossil Oncotympana lapidescens Zhang, 1989 with the description of a new genus (Hemiptera, Cicadoidea, Cicadidae)
Author: M.S. Moulds
Journal: Palaeoentomology, Vol 3, No 4
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/palaeoentomology.3.4.1

Title: Standardisation of bioacoustic terminology for insects
Author: Edward Baker, David Chesmore
Journal: Biodiversity Data Journal, 8:e54222
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.8.e54222

Title: Four new species of cicadas in the Yoyetta abdominalis (Distant) species group (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae) from southeastern Australia
Author: Lindsay W. Popple, David L. Emery
Journal: Records of the Australian Museum, 72(4): 123—147
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3853/j.2201-4349.72.2020.1765

July

?

June

Title: Behavioral betrayal: How select fungal parasites enlist living insects to do their bidding
Authors: Brian Lovett, Angie Macias, Jason E. Stajich, John Cooley, J√ɬłrgen Eilenberg, Henrik H. de Fine Licht, Matt T. Kasson
Journal: PLoS Pathog 16(6): e1008598
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1008598

Title: Look closely and listen carefully: unexpected cicada diversity in northern Sardinia, with the description of a new species (Cicadidae: Tibicina)
Author: Thomas Hertach
Journal: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, zlaa047
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlaa047

Title: Additions to the cicada (Insecta: Hemiptera: Cicadidae) fauna
of India: first report and range extension of four species with notes on their natural history from Meghalaya

Authors: Vivek Sarkar, Cuckoo Mahapatra, Pratyush P. Mohapatra & Manoj V. Nair
Journal: Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol. 12 | No. 9 | Pages: 16021—16042
DOI: 10.11609/jot.5668.12.9.16021-16042

May

Title: The cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of Peru including the description of twenty-four new species, three new synonymies, and thirty-seven new records
Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Zootaxa Vol 4785, No 1
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4785.1

Title: Molecular and Topographical Organization: Influence on Cicada Wing Wettability and Bactericidal Properties
Authors: Jessica Rom√°n-Kustas, Jacob B. Hoffman, Julian H. Reed, Andrew E. Gonsalves, Junho Oh, Longnan Li, Sungmin Hong, Kyoo D. Jo, Catherine E. Dana, Nenad Miljkovic, Donald M. Cropek, Marianne Alleyne
Journal: Advanced Material Interfaces, Volume7, Issue10
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/admi.202000112

Title: True cicadas (Cicadidae) as prey for the birds of the Western Palearctic: a review
Author: Pere Pons
Journal: Avian Research volume 11, Article number: 14 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40657-020-00200-1

Title: Evolutionary relationships among Massospora spp. (Entomophthorales), obligate pathogens of cicadas
Authors: Angie M. Macias, David M. Geiser, Jason E. Stajich, Piotr Lukasik, Claudio Veloso, DeAnna C. Bublitz, Matthew C. Berger, Greg R. Boyce , Kathie Hodge & Matt T. Kasson
Journal: Mycologia, Volume 112, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/00275514.2020.1742033

April

Title: New genus and species of Leptopsaltriini (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae) from China and Vietnam, with colour-changing behaviour reported for the first time in Cicadoidea
Authors: Cong Wei, Siyue Wang, Masami Hayashi, Miao He, Hong Thai Pham
Journal: Zootaxa Vol 4759, No 2.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4759.2

Title: Replacement name for the cicada genus Pycnoides Sanborn, 2020
(Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Platypleurini) and sixteen new combinations

Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Zootaxa Vol 4759, No 4
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4759.4

Title: Eight new species and three new records of Neotropical cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) from Venezuela
Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Journal of Insect Biodiversity, Vol 16, No 1
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12976/jib/2020.16.1.2

March

Title: Redefinition of the cicada tribe Hemidictyini Distant, 1905, status of the tribe Iruanini Boulard, 1993 rev. stat., and the establishment of Hovanini n. tribe and Sapantangini n. tribe (Hemiptera: Cicadidae)
Authors: Allen F. Sanborn, David C. Marshall, Maxwell S. Moulds, Stéphane Puissant, Chris Simon
Journal: Zootaxa, Vol 4747, No 1.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4747.1.5

Title: On the morphology and evolution of cicadomorphan tymbal organs
Authors: Leonidas-Romanos Davranoglou, Beth Mortimer, Graham K.Taylor, Igor Malenovsk√ɬĹ
Journal: Arthropod Structure & Development, Volume 55
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asd.2020.100918

Title: A new species of the genus Tanna Distant (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Leptopsaltriini) from Vietnam, with notes on taxonomic changes in Tanna
Authors: Young June Lee, David Lyall Emery
Journal: Journal of Asia-Pacific Biodiversity, Volume 13, Issue 1
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.japb.2019.09.007

Title: Evaluation of Organically Acceptable Methods to Control Periodical Cicada (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) Oviposition Injury on Nonbearing Apple Trees
Author: Daniel L. Frank
Journal: J. of Entomological Science, 55(2):210-218 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.18474/0749-8004-55.2.210

February

Title: Automated acoustic detection of a cicadid pest in coffee plantations
Authors: Jo√£o Paulo Lemos Escola, Rodrigo Capobianco Guido, Ivan Nunes da Silva, Alexandre Moraes Cardoso, Douglas Henrique Bottura Maccagnan, Artur Kenzo Dezotti
Journal: Computers and Electronics in Agriculture, Volume 169.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2020.105215

Title: Quality consistency evaluation on four origins of Cicadae Periostracum by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis
Authors: Xin-Ci Cao, Xiao-Ya Zhang, Jin-Di Xu, Hong Shen, Shan-Shan Zhou, He Zhu, Ming Kong, Wei Zhang, Gui-Rong Zhou, Yi He, Qian Mao, Song-Lin Li
Journal: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, Volume 179
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpba.2019.112974

Title: Afromelampsalta, a new genus, a new species, and five new combinations of African cicadettine cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae)
Authors: Allen F. Sanborn, Martin H. Villet
Journal: Zootaxa, Vol 4731, No 4.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4731.4

Title: Emergence of a novel interaction between brown bear and cicada due to anthropogenic habitat modification
Authors: Kanji Tomita, Tsutom Hiura
Journal: bioRxiv
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.02.22.960583
Notes: Not peer reviewed yet.

Title: Dyticodopoea and Pygmaeodopoea, New Genera for the Central American Cicada Species Previously Assigned to Odopoea Stål, 1861 (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea: Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Zammarini)
Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, 122(1):117-126 (2020).
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4289/0013-8797.122.1.117

January

Title: A new species of Oligoglena Horv√°th, 1912 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) from Mediterranean Turkey
Author: Abbas Mol.
Journal: Zoology in the Middle East
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/09397140.2020.1711624

Title: Not all cicadas increase thermal tolerance in response to a temperature gradient in metropolitan Seoul
Authors: Hoa Quynh Nguyen, Hortense Serret, Yoonhyuk Bae, Seongmin Ji, Soyeon Chae, Ye Inn Kim, Jeongjoo Ha & Yikweon Jang
Journal: Sci Rep 10, 1343 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-58276-0

Title: Redescription of the cicada genus Pycna Amyot & Audinet-Serville, 1843 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Platypleurini) with the formation of two new genera, one new species, one revised species status and twenty-four new combinations
Author: Allen F. Sanborn
Journal: Zootaxa, Vol 4722, No 2
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4722.2.3

No month

Title: Rapid authentication of the Cicadidae Periostracum using a COI sequence-based SCAR markers
Authors: Pureum Noh, Wook Jin Kim, Sungyu Yang, Inkyu Park, Jun-Ho Song, Goya Choi, Byeong Cheol Moon
Journal: Integrative Medicine Research, Volume 9, Supplement 1
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.imr.2020.100580

Data

Magicicada septendecim & Magicicada septendecula genome datasets including genome, transcript and protein sequence, annotation and a data report
Site: National Library of Medicine
Link: Magicicada genome datasets

Cicada Research Wordcloud

September 13, 2020

Australian Cicada Names

Filed under: Australia | David Emery | L. W. Popple | Nathan Emery — Dan @ 1:01 am

This page features information about common cicadas of Australia researchers, and websites dedicated to the cicadas of Australia. Australia has the best cicada names!

News

Bladder Cicada (Cystosoma saundersii)

The Bladder Cicada can be sound in eastern Queensland & NSW1, can be found September-January, peaking in October2.

Bladder cicadas (Cystosoma saundersii)
Photo by David Emery.

Cyclochila australasiae

Cyclochila australasiae can be found in eastern Queensland, NSW and Victoria, and most emerge between September & December1, but peaking in November2.

All Cyclochila australasiae info on this site.

Green Grocer morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae) photo by Bron
Photo by Bron.

Green Grocer morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Kevin Lee's Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by Kevin Lee. Yellow-Green Green Grocer with Mask.

Yellow Monday morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Yellow Monday (Cyclochila australasiae) photos by Tom Katzoulopolopoulous.
Photo by Tom Katzoulopolopoulous.

Blue Moon morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Cyclochila australasiae, Blue Moon, by David Emery
Photo by David Emery.

Masked Devil morph of Cyclochila australasiae

Masked Devil cicada (Cyclochila australasiae). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Bagpipe Cicada (Lembeja paradoxa)

The Bagpipe cicada can be found in the Northern tip of Queensland1, from October to February, but they’re most common during January2.

Lembeja paradoxa (Karsch, 1890). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Cherrynose or Whiskey Drinker (Macrotristria angularis)

The Cherry Nose cicada can be found in Eastern Queensland, NSW, and a small part of South Australia, and is found November-February1, but is most common in December2.

Cherry Nose cicada (Macrotristria angularis). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)

The Double Drummer can be found in parts of eastern Queensland and Eastern NSW, from November to early March1. Peaks in December.

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)
Photo by Dan.

White Drummer (Arunta perulata)

The White Drummer cicada can be found in eastern Queensland and NSW, from November to April, but they are most common during December and January1.

White Drummer cicada (Arunta perulata). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Redeye cicada (Psaltoda moerens)

The Redeye cicada can be found in eastern NSW, Victoria, and Tasmania, and are most abundant in late November and December1, but can be found until February2.

Redeye cicada (Aleeta curvicosta). Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Diemeniana Distant, 1906

The Diemeniana euronotiana can be found in eastern NSW, south-eastern Victoria, and Tasmania. They are most common from late November to January1.


Diemeniana euronotiana. Photo by David Emery.

Golden Emperor (Anapsaltoda pulchra)

When is it out: Nov-Jan.

Anapsaltoda pulchra - Golden Emperors. Photo by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Floury Baker (Aleeta curvicosta)

The Floury Baker can be found along the coast of Queensland & NSW. Adults are most common in late December and January1.

Floury Baker by Michelle Thompson
Photo by Michelle Thompson.

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata)

When: January.

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata) photos by Jodi from 2007. Australia.
Photo by Jodi.

Tettigarcta White, 1845

Out: January-May.

Tettigarctidae sp.
Tettigarcta tomentosa.

More interesting names:

  • Brown Bunyip (Tamasa tristigma) [Brown Bunyip]
  • Typewriter (Pauropsalta extrema) [picture]
  • Sandgrinder (Arenopsaltria fullo) [picture]

Black Prince/Silver Knight (Psaltoda plaga)

Tiger Prince (Macrotristria godingi)

Date and location:
1 Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990.
2 iNaturalist.com.

Researchers & resources:

David Emery

David Emery is a cicada researcher and has contributed many of the images you see on this website.

Use this amazing image by David Emery to identify some of the most well-known Australian cicada species:

Aussie cicadas 1 (3)

Nathan Emery

Nathan Emery released a cicada book called “A photo guide to the common cicadas of the Greater Sydney Region”. You can buy it online.
A photo guide to the common cicadas of the Greater Sydney Region

Dr. Popple

M.S. Moulds

Websites

  • Common names of Australian insects.
  • Atlas of Living Australia Cicada page.
  • Brisbane Cicadas.
  • Narelle Power’s Cicada Photos.
  • Scribbly Gum’s The Summer of Signing Cicadas.
  • Morwell National Park Online.
  • Laura Imbruglia sings songs that mention Green Grocers and Yellow Mondays on her album “It Makes a Crunchy Noise”.
  • (more…)

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