Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

July 23, 2023

Summer of Neotibicen tibicen tibicen – July 23rd, part 1

Filed under: Molting | Neotibicen | Photos & Illustrations | Teneral — Tags: — Dan @ 7:43 pm

Enjoy the Summer of Neotibicen tibicen tibicen gallery for July 23rd, part 1.

A recently molted male Neotibicen tibicen tibicen
July 23 (small) 1

Two recently molted Neotibicen tibicen tibicen. Male in the foreground, Female in the background.
July 23 (small) 2

A fully sclerotized female Neotibicen tibicen tibicen
July 23 (small) 3

A recently molted male Neotibicen tibicen tibicen
July 23 (small) 4

A recently molted male Neotibicen tibicen tibicen. I don’t know how it got around that spruce sap!
July 23 (small) 5

July 23 (small) 6

A molting Neotibicen tibicen tibicen
July 23 (small) 7

A molting Female Neotibicen tibicen tibicen:
July 23 (small) 8

SoNtt Calendar: July 16th, July 22nd, July 23rd part 1, July 23rd part 2, July 24th, July 26th, July 27th, July 28th, July 29th, July 30th part 1, July 30th part 2, August 1st, August 4th, August 9th, August 11th, August 13th.

July 22, 2023

Summer of Neotibicen tibicen tibicen – July 22nd

Filed under: Neotibicen | Photos & Illustrations | Teneral — Tags: — Dan @ 7:44 pm

This is the July 22nd edition of the summer of Neotibicen tibicen tibicen photo series.
Take a look at July 16th edition.

Trivia: an older name of this cicada was Tibicen chloromera. Chloromera means green thighs.

Note the green thighs of these molting (formerly known as) chloromera:
July 22nd Neotibicen tibicen tibicen

July 22nd Neotibicen tibicen tibicen

SoNtt Calendar: July 16th, July 22nd, July 23rd part 1, July 23rd part 2, July 24th, July 26th, July 27th, July 28th, July 29th, July 30th part 1, July 30th part 2, August 1st, August 4th, August 9th, August 11th, August 13th.

July 16, 2023

Summer of Neotibicen tibicen tibicen – July 16th

Filed under: Neotibicen | Photos & Illustrations | Teneral — Tags: — Dan @ 7:09 pm

In my town, Neotibicen tibicen tibicen cicadas, commonly know as Morning Cicadas (because they sing in the morning) or Swamp Cicadas (not a good name because they live in a variety of habitats), are the dominant annual cicada species. Each summer they emerge in good numbers and molt on spruce trees, where I observe and photograph them. Each year is different, but usually they arrive the first week of July and continue to emerge until the second or third week of August.

This post will be one of many featuring night and some daytime photo, with one or two posts devoted to a single day.

Molting Neotibicen tibicen tibicen. Note the blue color of the wings and green eyes:
July 16th Neotibicen tibicen tibicen

One of the more interesting aspects of their transformation is when their head separates from the rest of the body so it can widen, and then is pulled back onto the rest of the body.

A different Neotibicen tibicen tibicen. Note the blue color of the wings, green eyes and green legs:
July 16th Neotibicen tibicen tibicen

SoNtt Calendar: July 16th, July 22nd, July 23rd part 1, July 23rd part 2, July 24th, July 26th, July 27th, July 28th, July 29th, July 30th part 1, July 30th part 2, August 1st, August 4th, August 9th, August 11th, August 13th.

July 11, 2023

Lyric Cicada Nymph and Adult Comparison

Filed under: Neotibicen — Tags: — Dan @ 11:15 am

The Lyric Cicada (Neotibicen lyricen) is found in most states west of the Rocky Mountains.

This is what a Lyric Cicada nymph looks like before it molts:
Neotibicen lyricen nymph

This is what it looks like as an adult:
Neotibicen lyricen adult

Hardened Lyricen 02(large)

Note that the Lyric Cicada’s eye color (brown), wing vein color (green), and foreleg color (orange-brown) are visible as a nymph and adult.

Here’s the in-between teneral phase:

Lyric Cicada Teneral

June 30, 2023

2023 North American Annual Cicadas Location Project on iNaturalist

Filed under: Annual | Proto-periodical — Dan @ 6:19 am

There are 3 types of cicada lifecycles:
1) Periodical: cicadas with a life cycle set to a specific number of years, with a predictable series of emergence years. Magicicada, for instance, emerges every 17 or 13 years depending on the species, and we have a calendar of years when and where they will emerge. Some “stragglers” do emerge each year.
2) Annual: cicadas that emerge every year without fail.
3) Proto-periodical: cicadas that emerge in small numbers every year (annual), but the size of the emergence varies significantly from year to year. Examples include Platypedia (see Platypedia putnami survey at Horsetooth Mountain Open Space by Tim McNary) and Okanagana (see Predator avoidance leads to separate emergence cycles in the protoperiodical Okanagana magnifica).

Considering there would only be Periodical stragglers in 2023, it was a perfect year for an iNaturalist project focusing on cicadas that emerge annually: 2023 North American Annual Cicadas Location Project.

2023 Project

This project includes all of North America, which includes Mexico, the United States, and Canada. iNaturalist determines the geographical footprint. It seems like most of the folks using the iNaturalist app are in the United States.

Typically cicadas in the southernmost, warmest areas (Mexico, Texas) emerge first. Cicadas that have black bodies like Platypedia can tolerate colder temperatures because the sun warms them up, so they’ll emerge in northern areas before other types of cicadas.

As of September 2nd
#1 Morning Cicada, #2 Superb Dog-day cicada, #3 Resh Cicada, #4 Northern Dog-Day Cicada, and #5 Lyric Cicada. My prediction is that the Northern Dog-Day cicada will surpass Resh in a week or so.

Screen Shot 2023-09-02 at 10.42.25 AM

As of August 25th

#1 Superb Dog-day cicada, #2 Morning Cicada, #3 Resh Cicada, #4 Northern Dog-Day Cicada, and #5 Lyric Cicada.

As of August 11th

#1 Superb Dog-day cicada, #2 Resh Cicada, #3 Morning Cicada, #4 Lyric Cicada, and #5 Northern Dog-Day Cicada.

Scissor(s) Grinder slipped to 6th place.

As of August 6th

#1 Superb Dog-day cicada, #2 Resh Cicada, #3 Morning Cicada, #4 Lyric Cicada, and #5 Scissor(s) Grinder.

As of July 30th

#1 Superb Dog-day cicada, #2 Resh Cicada, #3 Morning Cicada, #4 Lyric Cicada, and #5 Hieroglyphic Cicada.

As of July 23rd,
#1 Superb Dog-day cicada, #2 Resh Cicada, #3 Morning Cicada, #4 Hieroglyphic Cicada, and #5 Little Mesquite Cicada.

The Texan cicada hunters are dominating…

As of July 18th,#1 Superb Dog-day cicada, #2 Resh Cicada, #3 Hieroglyphic Cicada, #4 Little Mesquite Cicada, and #5 Morning Cicada.

As of July 7th, the top 5 cicadas are: The Superb Dog-day Cicada, the Resh Cicada, Hieroglyphic Cicada, the Little Mesquite Cicada, and the Lyric Cicada.

As of June 30th, the top 5 cicadas are: The Superb Dog-day Cicada, the Resh Cicada, the Little Mesquite Cicada, Hieroglyphic Cicada, and Putnam’s Cicada (a Platypedia).

Screen Shot 2023-06-30 at 9.14.13 AM

May 27, 2023

2023 Magicicada straggler update

Filed under: Brood X | Brood XIII | Brood XIV | Brood XIX | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 6:49 am

Updated for June 7th!

Here’s a map of 2023 Magicicada straggler sightings from 2023 Magicicada stragglers iNaturalist project and the Cicada Safari app. Dr. Gene Kritsky compiled the map.

Kritsky map June 7

It looks like there are plenty of stragglers from these broods:

Learn about Magicicada stragglers.

May 22, 2023

The Lucky Cicada Keychain as sold in Japan

Filed under: Japan | Lucky Cicada Key Chain — Dan @ 4:31 pm

If you’ve visited this website over the past 27 years, you might be familiar with the saga of the lucky cicada key chain.

In this latest chapter, we’ve obtained a version of the noisy toy as was sold in Japan (images below). Note that it does not include a keychain/ring, and sadly no longer makes a sound. Thanks to Roy for finding this on eBay.

The Lucky Cicada Keychain as sold in Japan

The Lucky Cicada Keychain as sold in Japan

Related articles:

April 13, 2023

Brood XIII and Brood XIX Magicicada will both emerge in 2024

Filed under: Brood XIII | Brood XIX | Periodical — Dan @ 9:42 am

News! A Brood XIX straggler has emerged in Georgia! More stragglers have been sighted in Hartselle AL, Pittsboro, NC, Chattanooga, TN, Asheboro, NC, and Chapel Hill, NC.

2024 will be a “magical” year for cicada fans because the periodical cicada broods XIII and XIX will emerge in 2024. These broods co-emerge every 221 years (13 X 17). The last time they co-emerged was in 1803, the same year as the Louisiana Purchase (the same year the U.S. got Brood XIX states Louisiana, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma). Coincidence? Perhaps.

Thomas Jefferson thinking of the cicadas he just bought.

Brood XIII (13) has a 17-year lifecycle and is found in the states of IA, IL, IN, MI, and WI. This brood features the species Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini, and Magicicada septendecula.

People (cicada tourists) have begun to ask “Where is the best place to see Brood XIII in 2024?”. I can recommend the Ryerson Conservation Area in Deerfield, IL. See photos and videos from my trip there in 2007. Illinois has both Brood XIII and Brood XIX, and all 7 Magicicada species. So you could spend a week in southern Illinois for Brood XIX and then travel north to Deerfield for Brood XIII.

Brood XIX (19) has a 13-year lifecycle and is found in the states of AL, AR, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, and VA. This brood is also known as the Great Southern Brood and features the species Magicicada tredecim, Magicicada neotredecim, Magicicada tredecassini, and Magicicada tredecula.

Do these broods overlap? If they do, it’s in the Springfield, Illinois area. Springfield is a good place for your cicada sightseeing “basecamp”. Take a look at these maps on the UCONN Cicadas website: Brood XIX and Brood XIII.

Your next chance to see and hear two broods co-emerge will be in 2037 when Brood XIX and Brood IX (9) emerge.

February 28, 2023

Free book about the cicadas of Brazil: Cigarras do Brasil

Filed under: Brazil — Dan @ 10:27 pm

Get yourself a free book about the cicadas of Brazil: Cigarras do Brasil. Visit this link and download the PDF!

The books was made by:
Vera L. Nunes
Tatiana P. Ruschel
Douglas B. H. Maccagnan
Paula C. Simões
Ruler C. Acosta

Cigarras do Brasil

December 31, 2022

2023 Cicada Forecast

Filed under: Brood XXII | Cicada Mania — Dan @ 10:34 am

This is the Cicada Forecast for 2023. Visit the cicada forecast for 2024.

UPDATE CICADA

Periodical cicadas: No periodical cicadas in the United States, India, or Fiji are expected to emerge in 2023.

There is a chance of Brood XXII Magicicada stragglers emerging 4 years early in parts of Ohio, Kentucky, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Read the paper Evolution and Geographic Extent of a Surprising Northern Disjunct Population of 13-Year Cicada Brood XXII (Hemiptera: Cicadidae, Magicicada). Spurious (small, unmapped) broods of Magicicada are possible.

Protoperiodical cicadas: Emergences of protoperiodical cicadas depend on multiple factors including species, location, and cumulative rainfall. Protoperiodical species belonging to the genera Okanagana and Platypedia have years of great abundance but are not as predictable as Periodical cicadas like Magciciada. We can’t say exactly when they’ll emerge in your location.

Scientists like Tim McNary track Platypedia putnami looking for a pattern in their emergences. Certain Okanagana emerge depending on factors like proximity to other species and rainfall accumulations (read Chatfield-Taylor 2020).

Both Periodical and Protoperiodical lifecycles appear to help these cicadas avoid total consumption by above-ground predators by overwhelming them in great numbers (too many to eat them all, so some always survive).

Annual cicadas: Most cicadas appear annually, so we expect most cicadas that emerged in 2022 to emerge in 2023.

Somewhat related: Dog-day cicadas (Neotibicen) are named for the time of year when the Dog-start Sirius first appears in sky. Depending on where you are in the U.S., latitudinally speaking, Sirius should enter the pre-dawn sky between July 29th (Key West, FL) and August 15th (Bangor Maine) give or take a day.

We can expect to see Cacama, Diceroprocta, Hadoa, Megatibicen, Neocicada, Neotibicen, and Quesada in North Amercia. Europe can expect Cicada orni, Lyristes, and Many other species. Japan can expect Auritibicen, Hyalessa, and many other species.

Countries in the southern hemisphere experience cicada-friendly weather September-March, so most locations in South America, Africa, southern Asia, Australia, and New Zealand that experience cicadas are in the midst of their cicada seasons at the start of 2023. Keep an eye on the latest cicada observations on iNaturalist.

While there are highs and lows in abundance, at least some annual emerge every year. Looking at how often people in Australia search for cicadas & cicada gives us a hint at how abundant cicadas are each year. Do you see a pattern?

Google Trends searches for Cicada & Cicadas in Australia:
Australia Data from 2012 to 2022

The future of cicadas on Earth: with each year the number of cicadas grows less and less. Cutting forests for giant warehouses, new neighborhoods, and even solar farms destroys cicada habitat. Spraying pesticides for invasive and nuisance insects eliminates cicadas as well as less desirable insects. Splitting woodland and meadows with new roads sub-divides cicada habitats and reduces their chance to meet and reproduce. If you see and hear fewer cicadas with each passing year, you know why.

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