Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

March 19, 2020

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri

Filed under: Brood XIX | Magicicada | Molting — Dan @ 5:02 pm

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri. 2011. Brood XIX.

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri.

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri.

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri.

March 13, 2020

Gina Scarborough’s Florida Cicada Photos

Filed under: Cryptotympanini | Molting — Dan @ 7:55 pm

This is a series of photos of a cicada molting by Gina Scarborough taken in Florida. It appears to be a Neotibicen sp, and definitely a cicada belonging to the tribe Cryptotympanini.

The pink color is amazing. Click the photos to get to larger versions.

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Nymph

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Splitting the skin

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Head coming through

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Mesonotum is out

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Wings start to expand

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

Gina Scarborough's Florida Cicada molting

March 8, 2020

Brood X Magicicada photos by Nate Rhodes

Filed under: Brood X | Magicicada | Molting | Teneral — Dan @ 9:07 am

Brood X Magicicada photos by Nate Rhodes from 2004.

Recently molted Magicicada, still hanging from its nymphal skin:
Brood X Magicicada photos by Nate Rhodes from 2004.

Molting Magicicada:
Brood X Magicicada photos by Nate Rhodes from 2004.

Two adult Magicicada:
Brood X Magicicada photos by Nate Rhodes from 2004.

Recently molted Magicicada hanging from its nymphal skin:
Brood X Magicicada photos by Nate Rhodes from 2004.

Molting Magicicada:
Brood X Magicicada photos by Nate Rhodes from 2004.

Magicicada stuck in its nymphal skin

Filed under: Brood XIII | Magicicada | Molting — Dan @ 8:47 am

Occasionally cicadas get stuck in their nymphal skins (exuvia) during the molting process (ecdysis). The reasons why might be external forces like temperature, rain, wind, interference by other cicadas or other insects like ants, or something wrong with the cicada itself.

This is a photo sent to us by Liz G back in 2007 during Brood XIII from Peoria, Illinois.

Liz G Brood XIII

March 7, 2020

Gerry Bunker’s Neotibicen Gallery

Filed under: Cryptotympanini | Gerry Bunker | Molting | Neotibicen | United States — Dan @ 11:50 am

Photos of a molting or molted Neotibicen by Gerry Bunker from 2005.

Teneral Neotibicen photos by Roy Troutman

Two Teneral Neotibicen photos by Roy Troutman. Teneral means soft. These cicadas have recently molted so their bodies are soft. The photos were taken in 2004, probably in Ohio.

This one looks like a Neotibicen tibicen tibicen:

Teneral Neotibicen

This one looks like a Neotibicen linnei or pruinosus.

This one looks like a Neotibicen linnei or pruinosus.

Molting Neotibicen cicada photos by Roy Troutman

Filed under: Cryptotympanini | Molting | Neotibicen | Roy Troutman | United States — Tags: , — Dan @ 11:09 am

Molting Neotibicen cicada photos by Roy Troutman from 2004. Probably Ohio. Looks like a Neotibicen tibicen tibicen.

March 2, 2020

Male Neotibicen tibicen molting

Filed under: Cryptotympanini | Molting | Neotibicen — Tags: — Dan @ 7:39 pm

Male Neotibicen tibicen molting. Other names for this cicada include: Morning Cicada, Swamp Cicada and formerly Tibicen chloromera or chloromerus.

February 29, 2020

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald

Filed under: Japan | Molting | Photos & Illustrations | Teneral — Dan @ 8:25 am

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald. Taken in 2004.

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald. Taken in 2004.

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald. Taken in 2004.

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald. Taken in 2004.

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald. Taken in 2004.

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald. Taken in 2004.

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald. Taken in 2004.

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald. Taken in 2004.

Molting cicada photos from Japan by John McDonald. Taken in 2004.

August 26, 2018

Tips for making a time-lapse video of a cicada molting

Filed under: Community Science | Molting | Neotibicen — Tags: — Dan @ 8:51 am

Molting Morning Cicada

Time-lapse videos of insects molting can be as visually fascinating as they are scientifically important. Cicadas are amongst the best insect subjects for time-lapse because they’re relatively large, and depending on where you live, easy to find.

Equipment you’ll need for your time-lapse video:

  1. Lights. I use cheap LED and fluorescent lights. Not enough light and you’ll end up with a grainy video. Too much light and you’ll over-expose the subject and miss some important details. You’ll need a stand or tripod for your lights as well.
  2. A tripod for your camera. You want your camera to be as steady as possible. Hand-holding the camera is not recommended. The molting process takes hours.
  3. A camera. Some cameras have a Time-Lapse mode, but you could also take a photo every 30 seconds or so and use software to assemble the photos into a video. A camera with a large view screen is recommended so you can make adjustments to the lighting and framing of the insect.
  4. A platform for your cicada/insect. If you film outside use the tree the insect decides to molt on. If you film inside, build a structure using tree branches, or other materials the nymph can anchor onto.
  5. Video editing software. Free software works fine, as long as it lets you compile a series of photos into a single video.

I made my own platform out of some driftwood and a 2×4 I had lying around. Cheap but effective. Cicadas need to hang perpendicular to the ground so their wings will properly expand, so your creation needs to allow for that. A lot of people simply use a roll of paper towel.

Rig for Filming cicadas

Skills you’ll need to practice

  1. Patience. Unless you’re a pro who films wildlife all the time, you might need a few tries to get it right.
  2. Learn how to use the Time-Lapse feature of your camera.
  3. Learn how to light a small subject like a cicada.
  4. The ability to stay up late. The entire molting process can take up to 5-6 hours, especially if you want to let the cicada’s wings and body harden a bit. Coffee or tea helps (you, not the cicada).

If you’ve never tried filming a cicada molting before, you can practice lighting, focusing and using the time-lapse features of your camera with a paper model of a cicada. Just draw a cicada onto a small piece of paper, and pin it to a tree. If you know origami, even better.

Finding a specimen

I begin looking for cicada nymphs about 15 minutes after sunset. I find them at the base of trees, or ascending tree trunks. If you plan on filming indoors, or on a custom platform, treat the cicada with care. Be very gentle, and place the cicada nymph in a spacious enclosure — preferably one that allows it to grip, and hang off the side. I transport cicadas in a pop-up butterfly pavilion/habitat — these portable enclosures are made for butterflies, but they work well for other insects, like cicadas. Don’t forget to release the cicada the following day as well.

The overall process for shooting indoors

  1. Set up your rig: platform, lights, camera. Make sure your camera has an empty memory card in it and is charged/plugged in. Make sure all the lights are working. Place a towel or something soft at the base of the platform, in case the cicada falls (it happens).
  2. Collect your specimen. Bring a flashlight and a butterfly pavilion (or similar container). Gently grab the cicada nymph with your fingers and place in the container. do not collect a cicada that has already begun molting. Take some (not a lot) of tree branches with you. You can use the branches to augment your platform.
  3. Place the cicada at the base of the platform. Let it explore and become comfortable. Place it back at the base of the platform if it falls or wanders off.
  4. Once the cicada is ready to molt, it will stay still for a while. This is a good time to get your camera in focus and lights in the right position.
  5. The skin of the back of the nymph will split — look and listen for that. Start time-lapse filming. Example.
  6. Re-frame the camera as necessary to capture the cicada’s wings as they inflate.
  7. An hour after the cicada’s wings move into place (see that happen), you can stop filming, and place the cicada into the safety of the butterfly pavilion — or on a tree outside.
  8. Return the cicada to the outdoors within 12 hours.
  9. Use video editing software to compile the time-lapse frames into a video. I set each frame to 0.2 seconds — experiment with the times.
  10. Add the species of the cicada, the location where you found it, and other comments to the video.
  11. Share your video with friends, family and the world.

More tips:

  • The process takes a long time — you might be up until 1 or 2 am in the morning. Be prepared for that.
  • Film some non-time-lapse video as well. There are key moments during the molting process that happen quickly, like when the cicada pulls its abdomen from its old skin. Having a video of that is nice.
  • Be prepared to adjust the framing and focus a few times during the shoot. Don’t adjust too much though — just if the cicada’s wings fall out of frame.
  • The cicada will double its overall size. Its wings will hang downward. Be prepared for that when you frame the shot.

Some results:

My latest time-lapse video:

Notice how I frame the video.

A non-time-lapse detail:

A video where I used a tree branch to make the molting look more natural

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