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December 17, 2014

Behold a molting Tibicen

Filed under: Tibicen — Tags: — by @ 5:48 am

Walter Abington sent us this series of photographs of a molting Tibicen cicada. I believe the cicada is a Tibicen pruinosus based on this guide to identifying teneral Tibicen.

A molting Tibicen

November 20, 2014

Watch a Tibicen nymph emerge from the ground

Filed under: Roy Troutman,Tibicen,Video — by @ 5:38 am

This video by Roy Troutman shows a Tibicen cicada nymph emerge from the ground.

Annual cicada nymph emerging from burrow. from Roy Troutman.

A Tibicen cicada breathing

Filed under: Cicada Anatomy,Roy Troutman,Tibicen,Video — by @ 5:31 am

Cicadas breathe through apertures along the side of their body called spiracles. This video of a Tibicen by Roy Troutman shows the opening and closing of a spiracle.

Adult Cicada breathing from Roy Troutman on Vimeo.

August 24, 2014

It is possible to identify Tibicen just after they have molted

Paul Krombholz has come through with an awesome guide to identifying Tibicens just after they have molted. Click the image below for an even larger version.

It is possible to identify Tibicen species just after they have molted

Notes on the species from Paul:

T. pruinosus [formerly T. pruinosa]—Newly molted adult has darker mesonotum (top of mesothorax) than the very common T. chloromera. Abdomen is a golden orange color. Older adult has dark olive on lateral sides of mesonotum, lighter green below the “arches”.

T. pronotalis (formerly walkeri, marginalis)—Quite large. The reddish brown color can be seen on the mesonotum of newly molted adult. Older adult has solid green pronotum (top of prothorax) and red-brown markings on sides of mesonotum. Below the “arches” the mesonotum color can range from carmel to green. Head is black between the eyes.

T. tibicen [T. chloromerus, T. chloromera]—has large, swollen mesonotum, quite pale in a newly molted adult and almost entirely black in an older adult. Individuals from east coast can have large russet patches on sides of mesonotum. The white, lateral :”hip patches” on the anteriormost abdominal segment are always present, but the midline white area seen in my picture is sometimes absent.

T. davisi—Small. This is a variable species, but all have an oversized head which is strongly curved, giving it a ‘hammerhead’ appearance. Newly molted individuals are usually brown with blueish wing veins that will become brown, but some have more green in wing veins. Some may have pale mesonotums that will become mostly black. Older adults vary from brownish to olive to green markings on pronotum and mesonotum.

T. figuratus [formerly T. figurata]—a largish entirely brown cicada. Newly molted adult has a pink-brown coloration with some blueish hints. Older adult has chestnut-brown markings and no green anywhere. Head is not very wide in relation to the rest of the body. The small cell at the base of the forewing is black.

T. auletes—a large, wide-bodied cicada. Newly molted adult is very green, but the older adult loses most of the green, usually retaining an olive posterior flange of the pronotum. The dorsal abdomen of the adult has a lot of powdery white on the anterior and posterior segments with a darker band inbetween.

Here’s an update for this article (8 years later).

This is a series of photos of a T. tibicen tibicen as it gets darker in color (photo by Cicada Mania). This cicada will retain the green color in its eyes and pronotum, but its back will turn almost entirely black.

Teneral transition of a Tibicen tibicen tibicen cicada

August 1, 2014

A teneral female Tibicen tibicen tibicen

Filed under: Tibicen — Tags: , — by @ 4:19 am

Earlier this week I was lucky enough to find a cicada nymph at a local park in Middletown, New Jersey. I took the cicada home, took some photos and then released it the next day. The cicada turned out to be a female Tibicen tibicen tibicen (formerly T. chloromera) aka a Swamp Cicada.


Teneral female Tibicen tibicen tibicen cicada


Teneral transition of a Tibicen tibicen tibicen cicada

July 28, 2014

Tibicen of the Day

Filed under: Tibicen — by @ 6:22 pm

Over on Facebook and Twitter I’ve been doing a “Tibicen of the Day” series of posts, as it is summer in North America, when Tibicen are active.

We’re counting down to end of the Dog Days of Summer when the star Sirius first makes it’s appearance in the pre-dawn sky, which happens around August 11th. Here is a tool to figure out when Sirius will rise in your area. Update! we reached the 11th and we’re going to keep going!

For folks who aren’t on FB or Twitter, here are the Tibicen of the Day so far:

Last post: this is a list of all Tibicen north of Mexico. This is the final Tibicen of the Day post…

August 17: Photos of a Tibicen canicularis. Tiny with brown eyes.

August 16: Tibicen auriferus (Say, 1825) aka the Plains Dog-day Cicada.

August 15: Tibicen resh (Haldeman, 1852) aka the Resh Cicada.

August 15: Tibicen resonans (Walker, 1850) aka Southern Resonant/Great Pine Barrens Cicada.

August 14: Tibicen lyricen engelhardti aka the Dark Lyric Cicada.

August 13: Tibicen figuratus (Walker, 1858) aka the Fall Southeastern Dusk-singing Cicada.

August 12: Tibicen duryi Davis, 1917.

August 11: Tibicen canicularis, the Dog Day cicada.

August 7: Tibicen davisi davisi (Smith and Grossbeck, 1907) aka Davis’ Southeastern Dog-Day Cicada.

August 6: Tibicen dealbatus (Davis, 1915) aka “What’s the deal, with dealbatus”.

August 5: Tibicen dorsatus (Say, 1825) aka Grand Western or Giant Grassland Cicada.

August 4: Tibicen tremulus Cole, 2008 aka Bush Cicada.

August 1: Tibicen pronotalis walkeri Metcalf, 1955 (formerly Tibicen marginalis) aka Walker’s cicada.

July 31: Tibicen latifasciatus (Davis, 1915) aka the Coastal Scissor(s) Grinder Cicada.

July 30: Tibicen pruinosus pruinosus (Say, 1825) aka Scissor(s) Grinder.

July 29: Tibicen winnemanna (Davis, 1912) aka Eastern Scissor(s) Grinder cicada.

July 28: Tibicen linnei (Smith and Grossbeck, 1907) aka Linne’s cicada.

July 28: BONUS! Cicada Killer Wasps.

July 25th: Tibicen tibicen tibicen (Linnaeus, 1758) aka Tibicen chloromera aka the Swamp cicada.

Bonus: a video of a Swamp Cicada calling by Elias Bonaros.

July 24th: Tibicen auletes (Germar, 1834) aka the Northern Dusk Singing Cicada.

July 23rd: Tibicen lyricen lyricen (De Geer, 1773) aka the Lyric Cicada.

Bonus: T. auletes exuvia:

July 22nd: Tibicen superbus (Fitch, 1855) aka the Superb Cicada.

May 26, 2014

Tibicen superbus videos

Filed under: Tibicen,Video — Tags: — by @ 9:40 am

YouTube has lots of videos of cicadas. Here is a playlist of one of the prettiest North American cicadas, Tibicen superbus:

Tibicen superbus, aka the Superb Cicada, can be found in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

January 1, 2014

North American Cicada Websites

These sites contain information about both periodical and annual cicada species:

  1. Visit Tim McNary’s Bibliography of the Cicadoidea for many, many cicada papers and articles.
  2. Insect Singers. A new site from David Marshall and Kathy Hill featuring dozens of cicada song samples from North America.AUDIO PHOTOS
  3. "http://hydrodictyon.eeb.uconn.edu/projects/cicada/">Cicada
    Central
    (uconn.edu) One of the premier cicada sites. Many pictures, maps and information. Superb Magicicada information. PHOTOS MAPS
  4. Singing Insects of North America (ufl.edu) A large site featuring lists of North American species and audio files. PHOTOS AUDIO
  5. Bug Guide (bugguide.net) A massive site devoted insect identification, including an abundance of cicada photos and information. You’ll find Cacama, Diceroprocta, Magicicada (Periodical Cicadas), Neocicada, Neoplatypedia, Okanagana, Pacarina, Platypedia, Tibicen, Beameria and Okanagodes. PHOTOS
  6. >Massachusetts Cicadas (www.masscic.org) tremendous cicada site packed with information
    and photos. Dozens of pages of information. Tibicens, Magicicada, Cicada Killer wasps. PHOTOS
  7. Gene Kritsky’s Web Site (msj.edu) Gene Kritsky is one of the worlds foremost cicada researchers. Book him for your next cicada event.
  8. Cicadas of the Mid-Atlantic (cicadas.info) Sighting information for Magicicada and annual cicadas in the Mid-Atlantic region. Yearly cicada reports are available. PHOTOS
  9. Cicada
    Hunt
    (saltthesandbox.org) Lots of information and photos. Cicada Hunt is a great site for families interested in cicada hunting and study. PHOTOS
  10. Checklist of Cicadas of Kansas (windsofkansas.com) A list of species you’ll find in Kansas, references, photos and illustrations. PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONS
  11. Guide
    d’identification d’insectes du Quebec
    (lesinsectesduquebec.com) En Francais. Canicularis and Okanagana rimosa info and photos. PHOTOS AUDIO
  12. "http://alpha.fdu.edu/~boyer/Entomology_folder.html/Entomology.html">Professor Paul S. Boyer’s Cicada page (fdu.edu) Features Magicicada photos, information and audio files. ILLUSTRATIONS AUDIO
  13. Homoptera: cicadas, hoppers, & aphids (ltreadwell.ifas.ufl.edu) Information about the Homoptera order, photos and illustrations. PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONS
  14. Insect Images (insectimages.org) About 150 North American cicada photos, including Magicicada, Tibicen, Okanagana, and Cacama. PHOTOS
  15. Gordon’s Cicada Page (earthlife.net) A photo and about 10 printed pages worth of solid cicada information. PHOTOS
  16. "http://insects.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/fauna/michigan_cicadas/">The University of Michigan Cicada Pages (ummz.lsa.umich.edu) The premier North America cicada site, until Cicada Central and Magicicada.org came around. Magicicada, Tibicen, Okanagana, Diceroprocta. PHOTOS AUDIO MAPS

Magicicada

  1. Magicicada.org is devoted to monitoring emergences and providing Magicicada information. AUDIO PHOTOS MAPS
  2. "http://www.biosurvey.ou.edu/okwild/misc/percicada.html">Periodical Cicada (biosurvey.ou.edu)
    A few photos. PHOTOS
  3. Periodical Cicada (umassgreeninfo.org) Many nice photos depicting the cicada’s life cycle, and good information. PHOTOS
  4. Periodical Cicadas (biology.clc.uc.edu) A fun and informative periodical cicada page with many excellent photos, recipes and 19 paragraphs of information. PHOTOS
  5. Return of the Cicada! Serious information mixed with humor and silly illustrations. (whyfiles.org) PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONS
  6. Seventeen Year Cicada (seventeenyearcicada.com) Dozens of Magicicada photos and info. PHOTOS

Tibicen

  1. Annual Cicadas of Arkansas (angelfire.com) Photos and information about Tibicen robinsonianus (formerly T. robinsoniana), Tibicen dorsatus (formerly T. dorsata), Tibicen pruinosus (formerly T. pruinosa), Tibicen lyricen, Tibicen davisi, Tibicen auletes, & Tibicen aurifera. PHOTOS

Diceroprocta

  1. Apache cicada, Diceroprocta apache (fireflyforest.net) A photo and 3 paragraphs of information. PHOTOS
  2. This page features a summary of the Diceroprocta species

Platypedia

  1. "http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05590.html">Colorado State Univerity Extension cicada
    page
    (colostate.edu) Includes a picture of Putnam’s cicada and a paragraph of information within 3 pages of various information about cicadas. PHOTOS

November 7, 2013

New Species of Tibicen: Tibicen neomexicensis

Filed under: Tibicen — Tags: — by @ 6:19 am

A new species of Tibicen cicada, Tibicen neomexicensis, has been described by Brian J. Stucky.

Read more about Morphology, bioacoustics, and ecology of Tibicen neomexicensis sp. n., a new species of cicada from the Sacramento Mountains in New Mexico, U.S.A. (Hemiptera, Cicadidae, Tibicen).

Thanks to David Marshall for the tip.

August 9, 2013

August is a great time to look for Tibicen cicadas in North America

Filed under: North America,Tibicen,Video — Tags: — by @ 9:33 am

Now is a great time to look and listen for Tibicen cicadas in North America. Tibicen are the medium to large sized annual cicadas. Typically they are well camouflaged – with colors like black, white, green & brown.

During the day you can listen for them, of course, and spot them that way. Try Insect Singers for cicada songs. You can also look for their exuvia (skins), and if you’re lucky you can catch on on a low branch.

Last night I started looking around 10pm and found three Swamp Cicadas (T. tibicen tibicen) shedding their skins on trees around the yard. I also collected about 30 exuvia (skins). All in a quarter acre yard. Take a look at this video:

Swamp Cicada shedding its nymphal skin from Cicada Mania on Vimeo.

Swamp Cicada

Teneral Swamp Cicada

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