Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

Cicada T-shirts

March 1, 2008

Brood XIV will be here soon enough

Filed under: Brood XIV — Dan @ 6:47 pm

Today is March 1st, and in a couple of months the Brood XIV cicadas will be here. I’ll work up a comprehensive article in the coming weeks. Historically speaking, Brood XIV has emerged in Long Island, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia. Some of Brood XIV pre-emerged in 2007, ands pictures of that on the site.

The first sign of an emergence is usually news articles. Here’s one of the first:

And here’s and NPR Story about eating bugs including cicadas.

January 13, 2008

Ever wonder how cicadas make that sound?

Filed under: Anatomy — Dan @ 11:28 am

Ever wonder how cicadas make the sound they make? Look no further than this article: What the buzz was all about: superfast song muscles rattle the tymbals of male periodical cicadas. You’ll final many paragraphs of information, but most importantly, macro photos, illustrations and even 3D models of working cicada muscles and membranes.

Thanks to Roy Troutman for this find.

January 4, 2008

Pretty Brazilian Cicada: the Carineta diardi

Filed under: Argentina | Brazil | Carineta | Carinetini — Dan @ 4:54 pm

Pia Öberg from Sweden took this cicada photo back in 2004 at Hotel do Ypê in Itatiaia NP in Brazil. Thanks to Roy Troutman and cicada expert Allen Sanborn we were able to ID this pretty cicada as a Carineta diardi (Guérin-Méneville, 1829). In addition to Brazil, C. diardi is also found in Argentina.

Carineta diardi

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Carinetini
SubTribe: Carinetiina
Genus: Carineta
Species: Carineta diardi (Guérin-Méneville, 1829)

Some more links for you:

More of Pia’s photos on Flickr.

What a fun way to start the New Year. Happy New Year cicada maniacs!

December 31, 2007

2007 Archive of Annual Cicada Sightings

Filed under: Annual | Brood XIII | Mail, Comments & Social — Dan @ 1:01 am

Although this post compiles Annual cicada sightings from 2007, is some Magicicada Brood XIII talk in the July-May comments. Comments are in reverse order.

I also live in an area of Australia where cicadas are hatching in droves. We’ve pulled dozens of casings off of the house alone, and today — so far- nearly a dozen have hatched. I’m rescuing lots off of my truck tyres. We have a rare type here, called the Orange Drummer. I’ve posted some pics on Flickr:

1_hatching_sm1

Comment by Jodi C. — November 26, 2007 [AT] 9:09 pm

Hi, I live in cicada heaven, which is in the Blue Mountains,west of Sydent in NSW Australia. Cicadas are found of all types and species. Any day in summer you can hear a chorus of cicadas which have been measured at over 150 decibels. You can literally walk up to any tree and pick them up off the trunk! Birds just fly up and eat them in front of you, but there are still cicada nymphs emerging in bright daylight (normally this only happens at night!) I think it has something to do with the unseasonally wet and cold weather we have been experiencing this summer. But anyway, I have loads of pics if you want to contact me: kevin [AT] padrepio.org.au
Blessings!

Comment by Fr Kevin Lee — November 15, 2007 [AT] 11:10 pm

It’s October. It has reached 92 degrees today (Aurora, Illinois) and I heard many, many cicadas.

A few days ago I also heard one in Naperville, Illinois.

I was actually surprised. But, I would understand since it is awfully warm out.

Comment by Daniela Barrios — October 7, 2007 [AT] 4:52 pm

A photo of a Masked Devil cicada that flew into my living room last night (in the Blue Mountains, New South Wales):
http://www.facebook.com/ph​oto.php?pid=341705&l=b46a1​&id=715264364

A shell I found a week ago:
http://www.facebook.com/ph​oto.php?pid=326996&l=2efbd​&id=715264364

Cheers!

Comment by Andrew Sweeney — October 3, 2007 [AT] 10:25 pm

Dan posted some of my videos of a singing cicada in Sacramento, CA recently. I also took still pictures of the cicada while shooting the video. Here are the links to the still shots:
http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicada6originalsizepic.jpg

http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicada2rightside.jpg

http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicada5originalsizepic.jpg

http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicada1originalsizepic.jpg

All I know is that it is some species of Okanagana.

Comment by Phoebe — September 14, 2007 [AT] 2:31 pm

I am not in anyway an expert ha ha , when it comes to cicatas , but from the pictures I have looked up I beleave I have found a common every year cicata its still emerging frome his exoskeliton ,I found him lieing on the ground on a sidewalk I knew he had fallin off of his resting spot and I knew if i left him their hed get step on or torchered by a human or something els so I plased him om my balcony and im worried he isnt emerging like normal , he is half way out and just stoped , I guess what Im trying to find out is how long would it normaly take the tibian cicada to leave the exoskelito ? hours , days ? or is it suposed to take a wile ,,, he obviously isnt in mutch ah hurry to go …. some one please help me understand this prosses better id be most gratfull to learn

Comment by edith — August 31, 2007 [AT] 12:05 am

I live just outside Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, and recently found a beetle that I’ve never seen in this area — someone suggested it might be a cicada. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to snap a picture, but haven’t seen any on your site that look like this. Do cicadas live in this area, and if so, would they feed from a Mountain Ash tree? My mountain ash trees seem to have some disease or pest they’ve never had before, and these bugs are also new.

Comment by Michelle — August 28, 2007 [AT] 1:46 pm

I live in Sacramento, CA. I have seen cicadas in trees several times in the past week, and I hear them all over the place. I took a few videos of them. You can see the best one here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ey5nMtPBjNs

I have several other videos, but YouTube’s search function hasn’t been working properly since July 25. When you search by “Date Added”, hardly any newer videos show up, including all my latest cicada sightings.

I also took a still picture of the cicada featured in my video link: http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/hardmf1/misc/?action=view&current=cicadainSacramentoCA7-25-07.jpg

Comment by Phoebe — July 30, 2007 [AT] 3:21 pm

Heard a strange noise. looked on the front screen. Found an incredibly strange insect I had never seen before. Finally figured out it was a cicada. We are in Northeast PA, and I think these are the 17-year deals. Crazy.

Comment by Eric — July 25, 2007 [AT] 7:14 pm

Hi guys,
I’m in Albuquerque for a conference, and last night around 8:30 heard what sounded like cicadas in a tree…where I grew up (Delaware) cicadas only call on hot afternoons. Was I really hearing cicadas? Or some other critter?
Thanks…

Comment by Melissa — July 20, 2007 [AT] 5:51 am

Hi Lindsey,
Those sound rather neat. If you can get a picture, post on this website and that could help identification

Comment by david — July 14, 2007 [AT] 4:09 pm

We live in Krum, Texas (near the Dallas/Fort Worth area) and for the past two years I have noticed some very tiny cicadas which come up from under our shrubs to sit on the porch screens. They are a mottled grey camouflage color, and measure only about 3/4 inch! They can almost be mistaken for horseflies. They do “buzz” like other cicadas if startled off the porch screen, but I don’t know what their particular song is like. I would like to know what they are, if anyone can tell me.

Comment by Lindsey Williams — July 14, 2007 [AT] 9:40 am

Hello all,

It has become very warm here in New York. For some reason the Tibicens are taking a while to come up. Possibly the unusually cool days may have delayed the emergence. I heard a Tibicen chloromera finally sing this AM. Caught an emerging nymph the night before, but none last night. The teneral adult is living amongst oak branches I have provided it and I am waiting for it to mature. Interested in seeing how long one could be kept in captivity (my record was 12 days for a periodical species) and if they would sing as well. (Had a septendecim that sang, the cassini did not). No T.lyricen heard as of yet. If anyone knows of any other species that inhabit the NY area let me know (Queens County and Long Island)

Comment by Elias — July 10, 2007 [AT] 7:49 am

Hello Dan,

Just recently purchased 25 cicadas rom Illinois. Unfortunatley due to the intervening Holiday (7/4), all dies except one. She is a septendecim female and still lives to today! I never knew periodicals could be found in July!! Here in Nassau county yesterday I heard a Tibicen Canicularis dsing at dusk and this morning in QUeens a Tibicen chlomera sang as well. Found an emerging nymph yesterday and placed him with the Magicada. Never thought I would see these two species side by side!!! Its been a great year for cicadas. Now its time for the Tibicens to take over.

Comment by Elias — July 9, 2007 [AT] 8:38 am

Amanda: if it’s a Tibicen cicada, then it’s perfectly normal. Tibicens emerge every year.

Comment by Dan Mozgai — July 3, 2007 [AT] 7:00 am

Apparantly one cicada is confused. We aren’t supposed to have a brood here within a couple of states this year, yet we found one hanging out with the June Bugs tonight. We are just outside Memphis, TN in North Mississippi. Not sure what’s up with that? TN is supposed to have a brood next year, maybe he came up a little early?

Comment by Amanda — July 2, 2007 [AT] 8:47 pm

Here in south Oak Park, Illinois, we just heard our first Annual Cicada, a Tibicen pruinosa singing about 45 minutes before sunset. Last year we heard our first T. pruinosa on June 27, although for several years before that we did not heard them until early July. We have been feeling seriously deprived of Periodical Cicadas in our neighborhood. We have to drive a few miles west, to the Des Plaines River floodplain, to see them in large numbers. At least we seem to be a bit ahead of the game with the Annual Cicadas!
Eric, Ethan, and Aaron Gyllenhaal
Kid’s Cicada Hunt

Comment by Eric Gyllenhaal — June 26, 2007 [AT] 6:12 pm

have there been cicada sightings in elkhorn Wisconsin? i’ll be there for a week and want to know how to prepare.

Comment by Peri — June 16, 2007 [AT] 7:37 pm

Interesting, I haven’t seen or heard(thank God) the little critters, but my man was driving to Tinley Park and while in traffic had the radio up quite a bit. He heards this high pitched sound, turned the radio off rolled the woindow down and he said it was like an invasion of millions of crickets. I laughed because 2 weeks before that I told him :The Cicadas are coming…” lol

Comment by Laurie and Mike — June 15, 2007 [AT] 10:44 pm

There’s plenty of cicadas in California, but they’re annual cicadas — they type that emerge every year in small numbers.

Comment by Dan — June 13, 2007 [AT] 4:46 pm

I don’t know what to make of it… this week, here in Santa Barbara, CA, I’ve heard that lovely, shrill singing of the cicadas. Not many of them & haven’t seen any, but I can hear them up in some trees. I travelled extensively through the South and lower Great Lakes in the summer of 2004, so I’m more than familiar with that distinctive sound. I wasn’t aware they lived in southern California, especially right on the coast like this… never have heard them before. Fluke of global warming or something? 🙂

Comment by C. Campbell — June 13, 2007 [AT] 4:42 pm

Over Memorial Day weekend we were at Railroad Park Campground, near Castle Crags, just south of Dunsmuir, California. We saw dozens of cicadas molting out of their nymph stage. They were mostly on the site marker posts for the campsites, but were also found on camp chairs, picnic tables and bicycle tires! I got a ton of photos of the emergence of the adults and the expansion and drying of the wings. I would gladly forward photos to someone who could identify the variety.

Comment by Rusty McMillan — June 11, 2007 [AT] 5:35 pm

P.S. SORRY, I LIVE IN CRYSTAL LAKE ILLINOIS.
LAURIE STEWART AGAIN!

Comment by LAURIE L. STEWART — June 11, 2007 [AT] 12:52 pm

HELP!!! I’M JUST TRYING TO FIND A MAP SHOWING WHERE THE CICADAS ARE. I WANT SO TO SEE THE MIRACLE OF THEM IN PROGRESS. I MAY NOT BE HERE IN 17 MORE YEARS. I FIND IT QUITE A SPIRITUAL EVENT.

THANK YOU SO MUCH,

LAURIE STEWART

Comment by LAURIE L. STEWART — June 11, 2007 [AT] 12:51 pm

Timberon, NM — After a brief email conversation with someone from this site, and sending him a photo of one of our local cicadas, it has been determined that the cicadas in the mountains of South Centeral New Mexico are Platapedia. Perhaps the ones in Santa Fe are of the same Genus.

Comment by Scott M. — June 10, 2007 [AT] 5:26 pm

I live in the suburbs around chicago and there were so many cicadas on one of my plants that it became smothered… I CAN’T WAIT FOR THESE GROSS BUGS TO GO BYE-BYE!!!!

Comment by Plant Luver — June 3, 2007 [AT] 11:44 am

I live just outside of Santa Fe, New Mexico and about a week and a half ago i was taking a walk in the woods and i noticed holes about an inch in diameter all over the place. I then noticed that they were housing some sort of beetle, but i didn’t know what kind. Well about three days ago i went outside and heard the forest alive with that unmistakable cicada song. The trees were crawling with them. I’ve never seen them this far west before and am wondering what kind they are?

Comment by Antonio mora — June 3, 2007 [AT] 11:16 am

I found thousands of cicadas up and down Chickaloon Drive in McHenry, Illinois. Some are up in the trees, under the trees leaves, and more are hatching as I write!! IT was fantastic and the niose was deafening!

Comment by Kathryn — May 30, 2007 [AT] 5:46 pm

I was camping in the Catskill Mountains of NY State (specifcally at Mongaup Pond in Livingston Manor)this Memorial Day weekend and cicada exoskeletons were all around. I heard they were Chicago area and was surprised to find them. We also had balck flies!!

Comment by Sonya — May 29, 2007 [AT] 8:24 am

My name is Kailey. I am 10 years old and live in Indiana. I just went outside in my backyard and counted 244 cicada moltings. And some live ones too.

Comment by Kailey — May 24, 2007 [AT] 8:49 am

Lake Forest, IL….First Cicada sighting Brood XIII at garden-goddess.blogspot.com

Comment by Carole Brewer — May 14, 2007 [AT] 7:18 am

We have an outdoor wedding planned in Lemont on June 16th. If the cicada’s emerge on May 22nd, what are we in for as far as “uninvited guests” to our wedding.

Comment by tryingtokeepasenseof humor — May 6, 2007 [AT] 10:53 am

Hello everyone. Long time, no see… Just wanted to share sometime indirectly cicada related that you may find of interest. I’m sure if anyone is a gamer, then you’re familiar with one of the most popular games currently on sale. Check out the “GEARS OF WAR” for the Xbox 360. You’ll learn of the big “Emergence Day” event within the game’s storyline. The enemy you’ll be fighting are called “Locusts” that actually come from the bowels of the earth! However, you’ll soon discover that these “Locusts” are not the little critters we know and love. Check it out. You may find if amusing like I did. Plus it is also a really fun game!!!
Check out http://www.gearsofwar.com

Comment by Les Daniels — January 5, 2007 [AT] 3:00 pm

2007 General Cicada Questions

Filed under: Brood XIII | Mail, Comments & Social — Dan @ 1:01 am

These questions come from the old General Cicada Questions message board. They are from 2007, so there is a good chance there are Magicicada Brood XIII questions interspersed. The questions and answers are in reverse order. URLs found in comments are old and likely do not work.

Tim,
I know the American species usually last 4 to 6 weeks. Rain won’t kill them, but it will silence them. And Australia doesn’t have 17 year cicadas — you’re just having a particularly hearty crop this year.

Comment by Dan — December 3, 2007 [AT] 9:05 pm

hi,

cicadas have invaded all of our gum trees on our property, it started about 5 days ago they just started up it’s strange because we have never had them before, The sound is horrific and they only stop at night then start up again about 9 am.

I live in Victoria, Australia in the north east and was wondering when will these things die ?
Does rain kill them ?
Am i experiencing a 17 yr cycle thing ?

thank you for your time

Comment by tim — December 3, 2007 [AT] 1:11 am

Hi.

I really new to the realm of cicadas and am really here just to ask a single question (though I have had fun perusing piccies).

I’m in Adelaide, South Australia, to the south of the Adelaide Plain, at the base of the foothills of the Adelaide Hills. For the first time in my memory, this year, we have had an abundance of cicadas of one particular type in the area. Calling from the tree tops in suburbia are these loud single click calls. And there are plenty of them. We’ve even seen a few flying around. The clicks occur all day during warm weather, but increase at dusk during those lovely warm summery evenings we get here.

I tend to associate the sound with coastal sand dunes and tend to think that this is where I’ve heard them before…just never near my house. (I live approximately 3 to 4 miles from the beach).

Now I can give you a pretty lousy description from a chance sighting one afternoon. The cicada we saw was black with orange or red eyes and an orange stripe on its abdomen. Sorry for the vagueness, but it was a chance sighting. If I had anything between my ears I would have grabbed the camera, because the identity of these insects have been bugging me ever since.

Now I’m hoping that someone can poke me in the right direction to identifying this cicada. As far as I can see online, there are very few cicadas in South Australia compared to the other states (Queensland seems to be a noisy place cicada-wise) so I’m hoping the search can be fairly narrow (in a huge family such as this one).

Any help greatly appreciated.

Best wishes,
Gumnut
(determined to discover that bug’s identity)

Comment by Gumnut — November 24, 2007 [AT] 6:29 pm

Sure it is okay for your kid to keep a cicada as a pet, though it won’t last long in captivity.

Comment by Dan — November 21, 2007 [AT] 6:02 am

Is it ok for my mature 12 year old daughter to have a cicada as a pet?

Comment by BJ — November 21, 2007 [AT] 1:31 am

Cicadas and Moonlight—

I too am an observer. Tell me if anyone else noticed that the Cicadas gravitate toward the moonlight when they come out of the ground for their first walk on the surface. The moment they emered from the ground, there was a uniformity, almost like soldiers, when the walked up our hill. The cicadas found on the trees and telephone poles were on the moomlit side…always. Anyone notice this as a pattern?

Comment by lynn — October 12, 2007 [AT] 4:54 pm

Lauren: red this FAQ https://www.cicadamania.com/faq.html#a15

Comment by Dan — September 5, 2007 [AT] 5:17 am

NYC has killed so many insects spraying for “west nile”!

It’s a total scam!

Comment by Billy — September 4, 2007 [AT] 11:42 am

Today I noticed that this is the first year I have not heard one cicada… and I strongly believe that NYC has killed them & alot of other vital insects necessary to our eco system… how can we stop this destructive spraying which is mainly to make money!

Comment by Billy — September 4, 2007 [AT] 11:41 am

My daughter would like to know how the cacada make it’s noise. Thanks

Comment by Lauren — September 4, 2007 [AT] 8:08 am

andyru712: yes, it’s called the New Forest cicada. http://www.ukbap.org.uk/ukplans.aspx?ID=216

Comment by Dan — September 3, 2007 [AT] 8:13 am

please can anyone tell me if england has cicada. i am having trouble finding any info!

Comment by andyru712 — September 3, 2007 [AT] 6:29 am

Some co-workers and I have been marvelling at the buzzing of the cicadas in the small forested area outside of our workplace. We hadn’t actually seen one until the other day when one appeared on the outside of the building. It did not move however and stayed there for three days. I figured it probably died so i nudged it gently with a stick. It fell to the ground where I gave it another poke and it moved its leg. Okay, so it is not dead but probably dying. A day later it was back on the wall. It had traveled about two feet on the ground and three feet up the building. What is it doing? Is it going into some sort of hibernation? For reference it is late August in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Thanks

Comment by Ben — August 20, 2007 [AT] 11:23 am

I am noticing a steady decline in the amount of cicada calls I hear daily. Recently they did aerial spraying of pesticides to kill the mosquitoes that carry the West Nile Virus. Is it possible that the pesticide is killing the cicadas, or is it normal for them to start dying off in August?

I live in Sacramento, California. Our cicadas seem to be Okanagana-something(rimosa?).

Comment by Phoebe — August 19, 2007 [AT] 1:23 pm

our litte buddies are gonme 🙁 🙁 what an incredible natural event….what a ethereal sound and so harmless…..I will miss them until next time…

Comment by Bill — August 16, 2007 [AT] 9:58 pm

The Cicadas have invaded NJ early according to the charts. These past few weeks we’ve noticed them and also holes in our yard (which we didn’t realize were from them-we thought they might have been moles or the like.) We’ve had enough problems trying to grow grass lately, and now we have these holes…what a mess! We had trees removed last year and I guess they’re feeding on the roots that are left.Looks like we’ll be having a project in the spring fixing up the damage. My dog & I have already hurt ourselves in the ruts. Glad they won’t be around for much longer.

Comment by Carmel — August 15, 2007 [AT] 8:09 am

Debbie — no they won’t hurt your house plants — cicadas like trees.

Comment by Dan — August 15, 2007 [AT] 5:02 am

A cicada landed on my leg on my back porch. I caught it and brought it inside to be able to show my grandkids, but it got away. Will it hurt my house plants? Will it lay eggs in them? I can’t find it anywhere.

Thank you, if you reply. I’ve been searching for someone who may be able to tell me.

Sincerely,

Debbie Nickerson

Comment by Debbie Nickerson — August 14, 2007 [AT] 10:37 pm

Hello, first I’d like to say, I never knew so many people liked Cicada’s. My question is this:

“Are there any rumors or legends about Cicadas?”

In times could they be seen as a bad omen? a good omen?

Comment by Nymph — August 8, 2007 [AT] 8:58 pm

Why hasen’t the editor of this site seen fit to post the news article (submitted & received by editor)that included a photo of the Cicada powered airplane my son & I built & tested?
Also, you might want to read an Internet site on Grasshopper Glacier in Montana & the giant gresshoppers that are found frozen into it!
Dick

Comment by Dick Bolt — August 2, 2007 [AT] 9:21 am

Hey Scott,
The photo on the front page are individual eggs taken from a small eggnest in an ash tree branch. Apparently cicada eggs get moisture from the live branches because these took about a week to dry up after being removed.

Thanks,
Roy

Comment by Roy troutman — July 28, 2007 [AT] 5:18 am

Are the eggs in the photo shown on your website indivdiaul egges, or is each one a sac/cluster of eggs?
Thanks for a great website!

Comment by Scott Williams — July 24, 2007 [AT] 1:00 pm

Hey…i have one of these little gems …i have the shell…and the bug…I live in Ontario Canada….Hamilton…
I am 45 years old…and have never seen one…im thrilled to finaly see what all the fuss is about!!

Comment by Nancy — July 21, 2007 [AT] 6:45 pm

Cicada Mania: I just wanted to say thanks and ask you one question is the magicicadas the cicadas that only come to north america?
– Thanks in advance,
Courtney.

Comment by Courtney — July 16, 2007 [AT] 10:31 am

Alex:
You found a magicicada over there? I could hear but not see any and didn’t find any exit holes; nothing. Just heard the singing, re-re-re-re-re-reeeeeee.

I live not too far from there and we have had the same type for about a week or two now. I’m enjoying the singing! =O)

Comment by Caerann — July 13, 2007 [AT] 9:46 am

Hey John,
What you ae seeing is the damage done by cicada females that have laid their eggs into each branch. They use a sharp needle like appendage called an ovipositor that will cut into a twig & deposit eggs. The act of piercing a branch will weaken the structure & sometimes stop the flow of sap causing broken branches & browned leaves.

Hope this helps, Roy T.

Comment by Roy Troutman — July 10, 2007 [AT] 1:40 pm

All the trees in our area, and we are next to a forest preserve, have large tips turned brown and are dead. The large dead branches fall from the trees onto the street and lawns, this especially during the storm of yesterday.
Some say the cicada have sucked the sap from these tips. What, in fact, is causing the tips to die like this?

Comment by John Powers — July 10, 2007 [AT] 8:41 am

Seems like the Kimball/Elston area is a late bloomer, huh. I found a lone one on the sidewalk near Kimball and Montrose today. Scurried up my arm looking for a place to emerge from it’s shell.

Put it in a fish tank with climbing twigs, and just as I finished it’s home the little thing checked out the branches and found one to settle on. It immediately began emerging.

Wow. I spent the last couple of hours watching it’s transformation.

Nature is wonderful. This is what life is about!

Now I must find a safe place with other cicadas so the cycle can continue.

Who still have some in their yard? Want another?

Comment by Alex — July 7, 2007 [AT] 8:59 pm

They are still plentiful and very active in Blue Star Memorial Forest Preserves on Lake Avenue in Glenview as of today, July 3rd. They seem to be a later group than those in Schiller Woods as there are barely any dead bodies in the Glenview preserve. Hurray!!!! Had much fun playing with the little darlings. =0)

Comment by Caerann — July 3, 2007 [AT] 2:21 pm

Is it possible our 17 Year friends are just emerging in the city near Kimball and Elston? I heard but didn’t see some kind of cicadas today, July 2nd in 3 or 4 very tall trees.

Cheerio then.

Comment by Caerann — July 2, 2007 [AT] 7:44 pm

I found a bug on the sidewalk in my backyard this evening, and it caught my attention b/c it looked just like a cicada. I thought they only came out every 17 years, stayed for a while, then died off. He was huge! Bigger than the average bettle and he was just slowly walking around. He seemed to be following the flashlight as we stared at him in aww. He looked very old didn’t appear to have any wings. Is it normal for them to still be around since the last time they were here? And if so, do they loose their wings and just walk around?

Comment by Briana — June 29, 2007 [AT] 9:15 pm

hey i am a student going into 9th grade and i have to find 6 legged bugs and if i get a rare one i will get an A+ and i think they will be around for a lil while longer

Comment by randie potter — June 29, 2007 [AT] 4:34 pm

I’m in Oak lawn and have only spotted a small handful of cicada’s by my house and it was only for one day.We had a storm that was blowing in from the south all day last week on tuesday the 20th and that’s the only time they were here.I took pictures,held them,and was just excited to see them again.I was only 4 years old the first time I experienced them way back in 1973 at Brookfield Zoo and at that time I was horrified of them.Now at 38 I’m fascinated by them but have to travel to other areas to find them.Does anyone know if more will emerge in Oak Lawn before they are gone?

Comment by Bob — June 28, 2007 [AT] 7:36 pm

I was surprized to see an cicada in Lillooet British Columbia this year, I never seen one before but maybe they could have been here all the time…. I would think i would have noticed them before as it was pretty big 26mm long. I have pictures and I will try and post at least one on this site.

Comment by Randy James — June 27, 2007 [AT] 10:43 am

I live in central Oak Park. I walked around the neighborhood on Memorial Day weekend several times in order to determine whether the nymphs were emerging. I saw one newly emerged adult cicada on 25 May on 200 block of N. Kenilworth-and then nothing for a couple of weeks. Now, in the past two weeks, I’ve seen quite a few cicadas-mostly confined to the parks, though-just a few in the neighborhoods. I wonder why the late-emergence here in Oak Park? River Forest and Maywood lie immediately to the west and they’ve had them for some time-now rapidly dying off. I think cicadas are fascinating as bugs go but I can empathize with folks who have to deal with that constant buzzing.

Comment by Rick — June 27, 2007 [AT] 8:44 am

Cathy,
Do a Google Image search “Cicadas Eggs”. There are a bunch of photos.

Comment by Lucy — June 26, 2007 [AT] 8:39 am

Many of the trees near me have brown leaves. I have read it’s because the females have laid eggs in those branches but why would the leaves turn brown? Do the eggs kill the tree branches? I would love to see a picture of the eggs in a branch but can’t seem to find one.

Comment by Cathy — June 23, 2007 [AT] 4:45 pm

Are all of the cicadas out or are there any areas that are still waiting for them to come out?

Comment by Peggy — June 20, 2007 [AT] 3:35 pm

Some of you will be happy. I just came back from the Lagrange woods. As I turned from joliet rd onto Lagrange rd, there was nothing but silence. I drove through the entrance into the woods, and to my surprise, there were only a few pockets in the woods, where the cicadas were still singing. There were many on the ground that were dying. I actually had 1 cicada drop on the hood of my car backwards on his back. I did try to turn him over on his feet so he could fly away, but he could not even stand. But the whole time he was watching me as if to say thanks for trying. Remember,we are ALL Gods creatures.

Comment by rob — June 20, 2007 [AT] 12:37 pm

Jill — Gerry Bunker says “An aggregation of cicadas.”

Comment by Dan — June 19, 2007 [AT] 1:42 pm

I know this group of cicadas are known as Brood XIII, but do groups of cicadas have a name like “gaggle of geese”, “murder of crows”, “pack of dogs”, etc.?

Comment by Jill — June 19, 2007 [AT] 12:34 pm

Living in the western suburbs near Lombard, cicada heaven. Work near Elmhurst, more cicado heaven.

Any idea when they will be gone? I am tired of running to the car and avoiding outside. I’ve had them landing in my food, on my shoulders, hit me in the eyes. I don’t mind the yearly ones, since they seem to stay in the trees.

Any idea? I know they are a wonder of nature, but enough already.

Comment by LL — June 18, 2007 [AT] 11:25 pm

In most places, the cicadas will die off by early July. The southernmost Illinois populations are already beginning to wane.

Comment by Dave Marshall — June 18, 2007 [AT] 8:52 pm

Is there any way I can get rid of these things? I own a 16 acre area in Wisconsin, and nearly all of it but our large yard is trees. Swarms of them make noises so loud I find it impossible to go outside because I get horrible headaches, and they swarm all over when I am out. How long until they naturally leave the aera (south WI)?

Comment by frank — June 18, 2007 [AT] 12:54 pm

I was amazed when a 17 year cicada landed on my leg. I have not seen any cicada’s in St. John until today, June 17, 2007

Comment by Sherry G. — June 17, 2007 [AT] 5:17 pm

At our Cub Scout Webelos overnighter, my son decided to spear, roast and eat a cicada. He told the other boys that it tasted like peanut butter. This encouraged other scouts to try them, including one boy who put one on a smore and ate it.

Comment by Colleen Gammon — June 17, 2007 [AT] 12:45 pm

Are female cicada’s bigger then male’s?

Comment by Diane — June 15, 2007 [AT] 5:08 pm

how long have the 17 year cicada been around northern illinois doing their ‘cycling’?

Comment by mike t — June 15, 2007 [AT] 1:20 pm

Just Arrived I live in Berwyn,il. There were none at all until today June 14 flag day. I travel these roads everyday,but today I was surpised when driving right by mcneal hospital,I saw several fly past. Then you could hear them. They are not as loud as in other areas, but I think they got a late start because it was so quiet.So this may extend their welcome far past july 1st.If Svengoulie reads these messages, then maybe he will do a show on Cicadas in Berwyn.

Comment by rob — June 14, 2007 [AT] 2:16 pm

WHEN WILL THEY BE GONE? So many people have asked and no answers. I’ve heard everything from 3 weeks to 10 weeks. It’s a total nightmare where I live and causes me great anxiety.

Comment by Cathy — June 14, 2007 [AT] 6:47 am

Patty,
Try this link. It shows maps where they’ve been sighted:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/specials/broadband/chi-cicada-map-html,0,1315785.htmlstory

Comment by Lucy — June 14, 2007 [AT] 5:36 am

I am in Aurora IL and have not seen a single cicada! I’m looking for an emergence map that shows abundant sightings as close to home as possible … Any suggestions?

Comment by Patty — June 13, 2007 [AT] 8:18 pm

When will they stop flying?!? I am fine with them cozied up in their trees but I can’t wear a windbreaker, hood pulled tight, for another 90 degree day. I think they’re cool and I like looking at them and learning about them, but… how many more days someone give me a countdown for my own state of mind. By the way… I live in Lombard (emerged May 21 in force in my yard) and I work in Hinsdale (cicada mecca) I need a break. Thanks and buzz on boys, buzz on.

Comment by Jenny — June 13, 2007 [AT] 4:42 pm

Perhaps with so many cicadas overcrowding certain trees, they move away from the competition to have a chance to get noticed and get the girl, so to speak. Who knows?

Comment by Lucy — June 13, 2007 [AT] 4:37 pm

Thanks Lucy. That’s what I was thinking too. It’s just weird. It seems more than just wind-blown randomness. There’s a lot, but not hordes. Almost like they’re purposely migrating. And I’m noticing increasing amounts everyday. At a time where I expected them to be dying, they seem pretty lively overhere all of the sudden. Thanks for responding.

Comment by Dan — June 13, 2007 [AT] 4:28 pm

I watched the “Return of the Cicadas” documentary a few weeks ago, and it said they can be blown around by strong winds/rain. We had a couple of really windy days a week of so ago; maybe some ended up in trees away from where they were “born? Or maybe they move to trees that are not so conjested. Just a guess.

Comment by Lucy — June 13, 2007 [AT] 4:12 pm

I work in Wheaton and live in Aurora. Both locations are ‘newer’ developments, where I didn’t expect to see Cicadas. Only since June 11th, have I started seeing/hearing Cicadas. I now see them constantly at work and they are buzzing in the trees all over by my house, and everywhere in between. I know they did not ’emerge’ here, but alas, here they are. I thought they didn’t fly very far. I’m wondering if anyone has any thoughts as to how/why they’ve arrived seemingly everywhere I go now. Any know?

P.S. I will miss them when they’re gone.

Comment by Dan — June 13, 2007 [AT] 3:59 pm

I just came back from the lagrange ill forest preserves. While I was driving down lagrange rd, I decided to turn in to the forest preserves. Although while driving in the area it was very loud,it was almost like a horror movie on tv when I turned into the woods.There must be millons in the woods.I plan on going back several times to hear and see this part of nature.I suggest if you can,go see and hear for yourself.It is truly a remakable part of nature and earth.PS dont be afraid because they are not.

Comment by rob — June 13, 2007 [AT] 1:05 pm

When is the madness going to end?? I have dead cicadas all over my patio and sidewalks yet there seem to be three times as many flying around then before. Everytime I leave my house and walk, more like run to my car I have to go through swarms of cicadas. For those of you who keep complaining about not seeing any you would have a different viewpoint if you had to live with it everyday and have fly into your face, hair, grocery bags, car, etc..

Comment by Kelli — June 13, 2007 [AT] 9:07 am

i just finally saw some cicadas in my neighborhood not to many but the sound was loud from what i heard i did not see them come out of the ground are they just flying near my house or are they getting a late start on it cause i heard they should be starting to die off soon

Comment by kev — June 12, 2007 [AT] 7:48 pm

I live on the North Side of Ottawa, Illinois, and I’ve seen only one cicada! He [or she] was on the ground on the side of my house. Marseilles, on the other hand, is full of them! I am so jealous. Where are they? Will we even get them here, or what? I’m not completely sure if there are cicadas on the other sides of Ottawa, though. I’ve heard the answer is no. Anyone enlighten me?

Comment by Courtney — June 12, 2007 [AT] 9:50 am

hey this rebecca i just wanted to know how long do cicadas live?

Comment by rebecca — June 11, 2007 [AT] 10:35 pm

I am so jealous of all the folks that have cicadas in their town. Wheaton has virtually none. I feel so left out. We actually went to Glen Ellyn to import some to our trees. I’m so sad…

Comment by Kirsten — June 11, 2007 [AT] 8:39 pm

at camp i saw a bout 1 thousang ciadas on one tree, it’s crasy

Comment by megan — June 11, 2007 [AT] 6:42 pm

at camp i saw a bout 1 thousang ciadas on one tree, it;s crasy

Comment by megan — June 11, 2007 [AT] 6:42 pm

Can Cicadas be born, well, mutaded like siamese twins? like a 2 headed cicada? or born without wings or somthin. or 15 legs??

Comment by Elijah — June 9, 2007 [AT] 8:16 pm

Jordan — I keep hearing they should be gone by July 4th.

Comment by Andie — June 9, 2007 [AT] 9:42 am

A couple more weeks.

Comment by Dan — June 9, 2007 [AT] 9:39 am

i live in Illinois. how long will the cicadas be around?

Comment by jordan cin — June 9, 2007 [AT] 9:37 am

I have a bunch of dead cicadas on my patio. Are these cicadas dead from other causes or are they the ones who have already mated? How long does it take for a cicada to die after it mates? I really, really hate these things but on the other hand I feel they should really live it up since it’s the last few weeks of their lives!

Comment by Andie — June 9, 2007 [AT] 6:09 am

Patti — they certainly don’t like cold, and torrential rains pouring into their holes. I hope they make it up to Milwaukee.

Comment by Dan — June 8, 2007 [AT] 10:10 am

Hey Cicada Guy — Love the website. I check it daily here at my corporate headquarters. We are so anxious for the cicadas to hit our town (Milwaukee). We had wicked weather last night. Heavy rains, winds and tornados all around us in the suburbs. Do you think this will keep the cicadas from visiting us? Is is possible they can die off before they ever get a chance to live?

Comment by Patti — June 8, 2007 [AT] 6:23 am

Put them up on Flickr!

Comment by Dan — June 8, 2007 [AT] 4:48 am

i have great pictures about cicada, i want to share them, how can i do that here?

Comment by Merci Yangco — June 7, 2007 [AT] 9:05 pm

It is just past dusk and I just returned from inspecting the fence pickets in my back yard. In years past the annual cicadas have used the pickets as much as the trees to pop out of their shells. But, alas, still no activity in northeast Oak Park. All the conditions for emergence have been met including temperature, moisture and expediency (time is running out). Does anyone know if the subterranean nymphs sometimes bump into one another down there and actually communicate? Might they be saying “two more days to D-Day” (actually yesterday June 6) or “the big break is tonight, pack your bags”?

Comment by Joseph Brady — June 7, 2007 [AT] 7:04 pm

I need to record the sound of cicadas somewhere near New York City, ideally somewhere accessible from public transportation. Any suggestions on where to do this?

Thanks.

Comment by Tom — June 7, 2007 [AT] 6:51 pm

I LIVE IN AN OLDER WOODED AREA IN ALGONQUIN IL…HAVENT SEEN 1 CICADA YET…WHATS THE DEAL ?

Comment by JAMES — June 7, 2007 [AT] 3:08 pm

We had a great emergence of Cicadas on our property in Midlothian on 5/23-24, but today 6/7, there appears to be a second emergence greater than the first! Scads of them on the trees and VERY active in the air. I know they are affected by tempurature and it’s hot today, but there are more cicadas today than in the last 3 weeks. Does anyone know what’s up?

Comment by Colleen — June 7, 2007 [AT] 2:21 pm

I too am terrified of them. I have daily panic attacks becuase they are EVERYWHERE. I live in Brookfield where they seem to live too. Can you tell me when this madness will end? Also, when will I stop seeing new ones? I cant handle it much longer. Though I found out if my fiance turns the sprinkler on….I can run to my car and I havnet been nailed yet.

Please, when will they stop?

Comment by Sue — June 7, 2007 [AT] 8:54 am

Do we have an end date for these little buggers? I’m terrified of this whole “phenomenon.” I live in a wooded area and there are massive amounts. They are all over the sidewalks, the trees right outside my door, my car etc. They fly and land on me, I’m having anxiety attacks, this is a nightmare.

Comment by Andie — June 7, 2007 [AT] 8:12 am

This morning on my way to work, i was driving with my window half way open, when all of a sudden i feel something hit me on the head. I looked to the backseat and happened to find a Cicada. The little fracker hit me on da head! lol….

Comment by Miguel A. Beltran — June 6, 2007 [AT] 4:22 pm

Depends on how old the plumb tree is. Older trees do just fine — in fact fruit trees are know to produce more fruit the following year after a cicada emergence.

Comment by Dan Mozgai — June 6, 2007 [AT] 3:17 pm

Texas, and most states, get annual cicadas every year. Texas has plenty of cicadas.

Comment by Dan Mozgai — June 6, 2007 [AT] 3:16 pm

In my Mothers’ purple leave plum tree there are little holes in straight lines going around the trunk and up several of the larger branches, are these cicadas, and will they kill the tree, if so how can we stop them? My Mother and Father planted that tree when we were small, now he’s gone and we are grown, she would hate to lose the tree

Comment by cassandra riddell — June 6, 2007 [AT] 3:03 pm

Here in South Texas, we comment about cicadas every summer. I saw what I thought was one a couple of days ago, but it doesn’t look like the cicadas I’ve seen on this site, and since they arrive every summer without fail, I am wondering whether or not they truly are cicadas. What can you tell me about their occurrence in South Texas, specifically San Antonio?

Comment by Christine — June 6, 2007 [AT] 1:57 pm

I BELIEVE IF THEY ARE NOT OUT YET I THINK THEY ARE NOT COMING

Comment by JOE PEPETONE — June 6, 2007 [AT] 8:51 am

As of June 5, I have only seen one cicada shell on my daily run throughout Northeast Oak Park. I mistakenly thought the full moon would pull them out, but I was wrong. In the last few days it has been either too cold or too rainy. Why OP is two weeks behind the western burbs and one week behind the north shore, I do not know. Maybe it is the collective concentration of people in Oak Park trying to will them into action. Then again, it may be Oak Park’s heavy clay soil that I suspect may be providing a cooler than ideal 64 degree emergence trigger. These are all just guesses.

Comment by Joseph Brady — June 5, 2007 [AT] 7:04 pm

THe cicadas emerged Sunday evening May 27th in our backyard in Glenview. We could see them come out of the grass and watch as the grass moved with them. We watched them crawl up anything including my leg as they began their ascent. It was truly amazing to see them crack their shells an transform before our eyes. THe next morning HUNDREDS were on hostas, tree trunks, fence posts, our deck. They crawled and practiced short flights. This ritual continues even tonight, eight nights later. The numbers may be slightly fewer but all in all, we can’t believe SO many keep appearing!!!!!!!

Comment by Sharon TIerney — June 4, 2007 [AT] 8:11 pm

Cicadas are prone to fungal infections. Sometimes the fungus expands until the abdomen falls off. I’ve seen walking cicada heads quite a few times. Male abdomens are also pretty much hollow, so that makes the situation more likely.

Comment by Dan Mozgai — June 4, 2007 [AT] 7:48 am

We were at The Grove in Glenview this past Saturday with our kids. We found about a dozen cicadas in the same location without bodies, just heads. They were alive and walking, and they were fully coordinated. I’m not talking about muscle twitches after an insect it killed, I’m talking fully alive cicadas walking with full motor coordination. They might have been able to fly, too, although I didn’t see them fly. They looked perfectly healthy and their wings were flawless, but they had no abdoman or thorax at all. We asked the experts at The Grove. They said that they had never seen cicadas like that, and said it must be a mutation of some sort. To me it didn’t look like they were born without bodies, and it didn’t look like an animal or insect ripped the bodies off because the wings were not torn up. It looked like they had simply dropped their bodies. You could see into their heads through their necks. There was dried light brown stuff that sealed the neck hole. The hole looked identical in all of the cicadas we found. Does anyone know if this is indeed a mutation or something else…perhaps a disease or parasite that makes the bodies fall off?

Comment by Amy Warlick — June 4, 2007 [AT] 6:27 am

Sugar Grove Il here,
about 40 miles west of Chicago.
I have not seen a single cicada as of yet. Even went to the forest preserve [bliss woods] not a darn cicada in sight. Are they not coming? I was planning on serving them to my inlaws for dinner this weekend, hee.. hee!

Comment by Deb — June 1, 2007 [AT] 11:43 am

Hey…um….Buster, just wait until the cicadas die off in a few weeks. You will get plenty of stinky “cicada mulch” then. BTW if anyone on the board fishes the nymphs are great fish bait. The kids & I caught a few dozen catfish with them several years back.

Comment by Roy troutman — June 1, 2007 [AT] 11:18 am

IF THEY ARE NOT AROUND BY NOW DOES THAT MEAN THEY ARE NOT COMING TO MY AREA

Comment by JOE PEPETONE — June 1, 2007 [AT] 9:36 am

Dan:
I wrote a couple of days ago, thanks for your comment regarding cicadas in Texas.
You said Texas does not have 13/17-year, can you tell what species (Dallas), problem being our condo has an open (wrought iron gate) facing a creek, one can literally hear right through the garage area up 2-3 levels, sounds coming through walls, earphones do not work. My reposed question, isn’t it unusual to hear 24/7? Also, how long before these non-13/17-hear species cease noise (most always hot, as you know, in Texas)…thanks again.

Comment by Pat — June 1, 2007 [AT] 7:19 am

I don’t get it. I live in the Western Suburbs of Chicago. The neighborhood is loaded with Cicadas. I went to the Forest Preserve (untouched for 40 years) and not one. Why?

Comment by Mitch — June 1, 2007 [AT] 7:15 am

I live in Roscoe (on the Wisconsin border, north of Rockford) and we have thousands and thousands of cicadas. We do live in the woods with many older oak trees. There is probably a 2 to 3 inch ring of “cicada mulch” around most of the trees, not to mention the driveway will need to be shoveled soon. The kids & dog are having a blast.

BH

Comment by Buster Hymen — May 31, 2007 [AT] 2:24 pm

I live in the south end of Glenview Illinois and there are 10′s of thousands of ciadias around our house. Not as many on the east side of our street as on the west side and even a few blocks away there are very few. It’s worse for us this time than last. The neighbors tree has so many at the base, that you could shovel them up into a small bucket. They are crawling up anything mostly dark… but even lighter objects, too. They seem to be selective where they choose to sit. Our two evergreen shrubs in front have few, while the small baby evergreen tree only 10 feet away is packed with the bugs on every spare spot. They started popping out a few days ago. So, I think they’ll be other reports coming soon from northern Illinois.

Comment by diane — May 31, 2007 [AT] 11:38 am

My blog below is about Cicada Powered air planes, not paper cicada look-ah-like planes!

Comment by Dick Bolt — May 31, 2007 [AT] 9:51 am

I like Cicadas. We had them here (Eastern MD) in 2004.None reported in Western MD as I remember.
I & my son built cicada powered air planes & got into the local newspapers with photo. I did engine tests (throwing cicadas forward to see if they flew & how hard)first & had kids collecting for me and working as if a science fair was going on. As I remember, females flew down & males flew up when released. So I chose only male engines. I built several 1 engine & two engine planes. Planes were from dollar store balsa cheep.I super glued the engines to the wings! I never got much out of flights. I guess if your but was glued to a board, you would not want to fly either! As I will not be alive next time around in 15 yrs, it might be another to hitch them correctly to fly! It was done with house flys, so why not cicadas.
*** in Bowie MD

PS, I have photos stored from 2004 somewhere.

Comment by Dick Bolt — May 31, 2007 [AT] 9:29 am

cicads are some wired creatuures!!!!!!!!!!!!

Comment by Myarra — May 30, 2007 [AT] 11:23 am

I wish cicadas were flooding my front porch! I haven’t seen one yet!

Comment by Anna in plainfield — May 30, 2007 [AT] 8:22 am

As of 5-29 at 12 noon no sightings yet on ten hundred block of Mapleton. Not many in the general area either, but pockets in River Forest.

Wednesday and Thursday will be the big days. The attraction of the moon, big right now, but full as can be on Thursday (5-31)may play a big part, but also may be a coincidence.

What do you think?

Have counted 2 to 3 mud patch holes per sq ft in between bricks on patio. But maybe these are from real big worms.

Comment by joseph brady — May 29, 2007 [AT] 10:43 am

Is it true that there are no cicadas, annual or otherwise, native to the Pacific Northwest?

Comment by Melanie Wilson — May 29, 2007 [AT] 9:24 am

I live in Huntley, IL and I have not seen one cicada yet!!
I am very sad becasue my daughter is 2.5 years old — the same age I was at my first Cicada year in 1973ish — Does any one know if they will be coming to McHenry Co??

Comment by Karen L — May 29, 2007 [AT] 8:11 am

Cicadas are flooding my front porch. Can anyone tell me of their dislikes. Something I can use to prevent them from infesting my home.

Comment by Cheryl Ferguson — May 29, 2007 [AT] 5:40 am

Wildlife should be seen, heard, but not fed by humans.

Comment by Dan — May 28, 2007 [AT] 9:07 am

Actually, Lake Michigan is probably cleaner than it used to be. In the past few years the gulls have moved inland. They can probably find more food in parking lots and garbage dumps than by Lake Michigan. I’ve even seen people feeding them in the parking lots. That’s probably why they are more abundant in the neighborhoods this year than 17 years ago.

Comment by Sue — May 28, 2007 [AT] 8:52 am

Texas doesn’t have periodic/17/13 year cicadas, but you do have other species. They should be making their presence heard soon enough if the weather stays hot.

Comment by Dan — May 28, 2007 [AT] 12:07 am

Are cicadas hitting Texas this year? If so, are these the 13-year or 17-year brood? Have never heard them here before. The noise has been truly incessant today, especially (hot, muggy) after recent storm. Have heard for the past two weeks (24/7), please advise your prediction how much longer before noise may cease, and isn’t it unusual to hear 24/7? Thanks.

Comment by Pat — May 27, 2007 [AT] 11:39 pm

I wonder why the gulls aren’t haging out by the lake? Maybe the lake is so polluted now, that they have to go inland for food — unfortunately for the cicadas.

Comment by Dan — May 27, 2007 [AT] 10:38 pm

The cicadas have been out in my neighborhood for a week now. We have had an enormous number of seagulls coming and eating them. Flocks of sometimes 50 gulls and more come down the street stopping to devour whatever they can. I know there were not this many gulls 17 years ago. Will this increase in the gull population affect the number of cicadas 17 years from now?

Comment by Sue — May 27, 2007 [AT] 5:57 pm

That’s a good question. They lay their eggs in the branches of trees. The females have an instrument called a terebra that that they use to dig out a slit in the branch and that’s where they lay their eggs. The eggs hatch and the cicada larvae flop to the ground, and start burrowing. They don’t die from the fall because they have a low terminal velocity — like cats and other small creatures.

The egg laying in the branches is what kills the branches.

Comment by Dan — May 26, 2007 [AT] 3:56 pm

You have a great site. I found it very informative.

I have been trying to find out where they lay their eggs? Do they climb trees to eat, then return to the ground to bury their eggs? Or are the eggs left in the trees and the larvae crawl down and into the ground?

I aplogize if you answered this question already. I looked and looked and looked and didn’t see anything about this.

Thank you.
Von

Comment by Von — May 26, 2007 [AT] 3:36 pm

kgmoney1 [AT] aol.com

Please don’t kill cicadas in order to find out if they’re sick. There’s plenty of dead ones lying around, you could dissect those instead.

Comment by Mike — May 25, 2007 [AT] 12:12 pm

I went out to my car and found a baby cicada sitting on the trunk. So i let it crawl on my finger and brought in side.

Comment by anita — May 25, 2007 [AT] 8:45 am

My husband and I were in Lombard a couple of days ago and saw many Cicada holes and a couple of live ones. I am out in Carol Stream and live behind a park and pond with many old tree, but not a single Cicada or even a hole yet from what I have seen. I am starting to doubt if we are going to get them in Carol Stream at all. I hope we do, I have been telling my daughter about it for weeks. Anyone know of an emeregence in Carol Stream or if they even emerge here at all?

Comment by Jess — May 24, 2007 [AT] 2:36 pm

Hi everybody,
I am a college student doing research on the 17 year cicada. I am trying to find out if the cicadas are parasitized by anything like pin worms, nematodes, or anything like that. I have collected some nymphs and dissected them to see if I can find any parasites. I have not found anything yet, but I plan to catch some adults as soon as they emerge. I was wondering if anyone knows anything about cicadas and parasites. If you do anything that may be able to help my research please send me an e-mail at kgmoney1 [AT] aol.com Thanks to all and have fun with the cicadas.

Comment by Kenny Glassman — May 24, 2007 [AT] 1:53 pm

I live in deerfield Illinois. I was walking around looking for cicada shells (in my yard) to look at in my microscope when I heard a buzzing noise. I looked over and saw a upside down cicada flapping its wings like crazy. I picked it up on a stick and took it over to a tree. Immediately, it started crawling up the tree until I couldn’t see it, so I climbed up myself (I made sure not to step on any other cicadas). Then, I saw it stop at nearly the top of the tree and then started laying its eggs! It was so cool!

Comment by Ethan — May 23, 2007 [AT] 6:15 pm

why do they come into certain areas? I haven’t seen any yet in my niegborhood but I know they are there.

Comment by Katie — May 23, 2007 [AT] 5:58 pm

why do they come into certain areas? I haven’t seen any yet in my niegborhood but I know they are there.

Comment by Katie — May 23, 2007 [AT] 5:58 pm

We’re aware of cicada in Arizona, but people rarely ask about them or contribute content, so there isn’t much mention on the site. You might disagree, but they aren’t as exciting as periodic cicadas. There is some Arizona info buried on the site, including this link http://bugs.bio.nau.edu/Homoptera/azhomoptera.htm
that lists dozens of species with pictures.

Comment by Dan — May 23, 2007 [AT] 4:49 am

I live west of Phoenix in Arizona in the desert. There is no mention of cicadas here even though we definately have the cicada visits. Annually.

Can you tell me why they don’t mention any in Arizona?

Their verticle burrow holes are very noticeable. Along with their music.

Our trees did suffer quite a bit of damage the last couple of years from them. My brother lost a number of small ones, where ours were larger ones. There are many trees here in the desert(palo verdes) for them.

I do not wish the cicadas any harm, but it you have a tree you would like to save from harm, I found a method that works. At the area where the bark is disturbed and sap is flowing, I use a stick to scrape of as much as possible. I then spray the area with a spray paint. The cicadas or other insects do not return to the spot and the tree is saved.

Thank you!

Comment by Lisa Bilinski — May 23, 2007 [AT] 12:09 am

I’ve never heard of them damaging conifers, but if they’re desperate enough, they might.

It’s safe to mow. The emergence in Michigan should be minimal.

Comment by Dan — May 22, 2007 [AT] 5:47 pm

Maybe 100 decibels or so.

Comment by Dan — May 22, 2007 [AT] 5:46 pm

how loud are they? like all of them together not just one?

Comment by Jenna — May 22, 2007 [AT] 4:26 pm

i live in the corner of southwest michigan, but have been out of state for a week. when i go home, the lawn is going to need tending- is it safe for me to mow? will i disturb 17 year cicadas beneath my lawn? will i harm them or start a swarm? when is it safest to mow?

Comment by kayla — May 21, 2007 [AT] 9:28 pm

Can Cicadas damage smaller conifers, or is it only small deciduous trees that we need to protect?

Comment by Angie — May 21, 2007 [AT] 7:42 pm

Cicadas drink tree fluids, and they do metamorphize. The final stage (instar) of their metamorphosis is called imagination, which is when the nymph becomes the adult (imago).

Comment by Dan — May 21, 2007 [AT] 5:31 pm

What do cicadas eat?
Do they have metamorphisis?

Comment by hailey — May 21, 2007 [AT] 4:32 pm

Hello Kristina,
I have a decent sound byte you can use of a Magicicada cassini.
I also have cicadas chorusing but don’t have good recordings of the other 2 species. e-mail me [AT] sbpstudios [AT] gmail.com.

Comment by Roy Troutman — May 15, 2007 [AT] 1:20 pm

My 7 year old is doing a project on cicadas for his 1st grade class. Is there a good sound byte of the cicada “songs” that he can play?

Comment by Kristina — May 15, 2007 [AT] 11:51 am

Hi Matt –

The key words in that text are “serious noise”. There will still be cicada sound after the choruses start to decline, perhaps still loud by many standards. It will be more like a month (after things first get loud) before things seem normal again. Those words are only a rough estimate.

It really depends on where you are too, in part because the chorusing centers tend to slowly shift location. If you get stuck with a really dense Magicicada cassini chorus in your backyard, in a tree right outside your favorite window, it will be longer than average before things seem quiet again.

Comment by David Marshall — May 14, 2007 [AT] 8:45 am

I’ve seen one specific reference about how long the cicada Brood XIII noise will last only 2 weeks (even though the cicadas may be around for longer than that). Can someone confirm? I’d like to know if the noise lasts longer or shorter so I can make travel plans, because the noise will drive me nuts after the novelty of it wears off.

Here’s the reference:

http://insects.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/fauna/michigan_cicadas/Periodical/magiFAQ.html

and an excerpt:

“How long will the cicadas be out in my yard/neighborhood/city?

About 4-6 weeks after they first start emerging. Most individual cicadas live only a few weeks, but since they emerge over a period of two weeks or so the whole event lasts longer. The serious noise will get going about a week and half after you first notice them and will last about two weeks more. After that things get a lot quieter.”

Comment by Matt — May 11, 2007 [AT] 5:14 pm

Do you know exactly the next emmergence or brood of magicicada in Illinois? Is it about 25 of May or later..
Thanks a lot for your answer

Comment by Gerard — May 3, 2007 [AT] 7:39 am

are you supposed to paint the exterior of your home during the cicadas? Will they spoil the paint job by attaching to the house? I would so appreciate an answer to this question!

Comment by iz reidy — April 30, 2007 [AT] 3:37 pm

They’ll aerate the areas around the trees, so you could still have the non-shaded areas done.

Comment by Dan — April 25, 2007 [AT] 2:13 pm

I was thinking of having my yard aerated this year, but since this is the year for cicada’s in my area, I wonder if I still need to. Will they do a good job of aerating the soil or should I hire someone to do this for me? Will this damage them if I do decide to aerate?

Comment by Beth in Chicago — April 25, 2007 [AT] 1:45 pm

My 10-year-old daughter has chosen the periodic cicadas as her school project subject. What she plans to do is attempt to calculate the number of cicadas that will emerge in our town. I am helping her with her math model, but she/we need a little help.

She needs to find the average number of cicadas that live under a single tree and a single bush. Also, the survival rates during the 17-year dormancy.

Any information source for this would be greatly appreciated.

Comment by scott johnson — April 24, 2007 [AT] 12:16 pm

Sir,
We intend to visit Chicago during June 2007. Please let us know whether we can joy our stay there? Whither Cicadas affect our stay & feel discomfort?
r.srinivasaraaghavan

Comment by R.SRINIVASARAAGHAVAN — April 17, 2007 [AT] 6:05 pm

the cicada is a japanes bug.

Comment by khalid — April 17, 2007 [AT] 8:53 am

I had a large tree removed down to the roots about 8 years ago. Will the cicadas still come out of the ground and, if so, where will they go?

Comment by Joe — April 10, 2007 [AT] 10:41 am

It’s 2 months away…we’re about to be hit in June with the 17 year breed here in the Chicago area. I plan to take many pictures and post them on http://www.seventeenyearcicada.com
This will be the third time I can remember seeing these creatures (I was four years old the first time and can’t recall 🙂
So stay tuned.

Comment by John — March 31, 2007 [AT] 3:55 pm

False alarm on cicadas in Fayetteville,NC. I went over to see what I could find, and it turned out to be thousands of frogs mating.

Comment by Laura — March 25, 2007 [AT] 9:51 am

March 25, 2007
I am in Fayetteville, NC and last night the buzz/chirping started across the lake. I’m walking over today to see if I can spot some cicadas.

Comment by Laura — March 25, 2007 [AT] 7:52 am

I have found in March 2007 a died couple (M & F) of cicada from the root of plant in desert of Thar(Pakistan)
http://www.colourthrophy.8m.com
rehman_azeemi [AT] yahoo.com

Comment by Anjum — March 22, 2007 [AT] 3:22 pm

hello all 5 pieces cicadas of 2 speces are avail able for reserchers contect rehman_azeemi [AT] yahoo.com

Anjum

Comment by Anjum — March 22, 2007 [AT] 3:15 pm

Cold blooded. All insects are cold blooded.

Comment by Dan — March 12, 2007 [AT] 7:59 pm

I have a question and answer sheet that i have to do for science and i was wondering if Cicadas are cold or warm blooded

Comment by Ari — March 12, 2007 [AT] 7:19 pm

The same questions on the life cycle and lifespan. please check FAQs on this website for ALL the answers

Comment by david — March 8, 2007 [AT] 6:52 pm

How long do cicadas live and what’s there lifecycle?

Comment by bob — March 5, 2007 [AT] 4:12 pm

That question again… Cicadas are cicadas and locusts are grasshopper. They are not the same.

Comment by Dan — March 1, 2007 [AT] 9:40 am

Are cicadas and locust the same or are they different and if they are how so?

Comment by billy — February 28, 2007 [AT] 5:57 pm

The advantage is predators don’t have time to adapt to their behavior.

Comment by Dan — February 25, 2007 [AT] 3:13 pm

What possible survival advantage can a 17 year life cycle have?

Comment by Chris Gladstone — February 25, 2007 [AT] 1:31 pm

hi all cicada lovers do you need any audio vedio or dry cicada of many speces for resersh only reserchers will be oblized
rehmany2k64 [AT] yahoo.com

Comment by Anjum — January 17, 2007 [AT] 1:10 pm

hi all cicada lovers do you need any audio vedio or dry cicada of many speces for resersh only reserchers will be oblized

Comment by Anjum — January 17, 2007 [AT] 1:08 pm

December 29, 2007

Noisy Australian cicadas more annoying that American cicadas

Filed under: Australia — Dan @ 11:16 am

After watching a news report (nine national news), it seems possible that Australian cicadas might be more annoying than American cicadas — annoying according to the ear of the beholder of course — I think they’re awesome.

The big difference between Australian cicadas and American cicadas is the loud & abundant American Magaicicada periodical cicadas only come around every 17 or 13 years, and annual species of American cicadas are loud but they aren’t found in large numbers or groups (aggregations). In Australia certain species of cicadas are noisy and abundant every year.

December 20, 2007

Diemeniana euronotiana

Filed under: Australia | David Emery | Diemeniana — Tags: — Dan @ 9:17 pm

Here’s yet another wonderful cicada photo from David Emery in Australia: the Diemeniana euronotiana. The cicada is a mere 20mm in length, and they are now just out in the bushland around 1000m.

Diemeniana euronotiana

The Diemeniana euronotiana can be found in eastern NSW, south-eastern Victoria and Tasmania. They are most common in late November to January. (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p. 112)

December 7, 2007

Misc. Cicada Stuff

Filed under: News — Dan @ 11:50 pm

There’s another copy of the Cicada Do Brazil Video on the Metacafe website.

tigerbeatlefreak has photos of Okanagana synodica, Tibicen lyricen, Beameria venosa and other cicadas on Flickr.

December 4, 2007

Green Grocer

Filed under: Australia | Cyclochila — Tags: — Dan @ 12:14 pm

Bron sent us this Green Grocer photo taken in Orange NSW Australia.

Green Grocer Cicada

The scientific term for Green Grocers is Cyclochila australasiae. The come in other varieties such as the yellow colored Yellow Mondays and blue Blue Moons.

Cyclochila australasiae can be found in eastern Queensland, NSW and Victoria, and most emerge in October and November (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p. 61.).

December 3, 2007

Orange Drummer cicadas

Filed under: Australia | Thopha — Tags: — Dan @ 12:53 pm

More Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata) photos from Jodi!

Orange Drummer

Orange Drummer

« Newer PostsMore »

Cicada T-shirts