Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

Cicada T-shirts

May 4, 2009

Magicicada septendecim emerging in Greensboro, NC

Filed under: Brood II | Brood XIV | Magicicada | Periodical — Tags: — Dan @ 5:56 pm

Tommy Joseph took these photos of Magicicada septendecim emerging Greensboro, North Carolina.

Update: looking at the maps, they probably aren’t brood XIV. Looks like they are Brood II accelerated 4 years, or Brood XIX accelerated 2 years (which would make them 13 year cicadas).

Big pile of skins:
Big pile of cicada skins

Magicicada with damaged wings:
Magicicada with damaged wings

Adult Magicicada:
Adult Magicicada

Exuvia/skin/shell:
Magicicada Exuvia

Male Magicicada septendecim:
Male Magicicada septendecim

Exuvia/skins/shells on leaves:
Exuvia/skins on leaves

April 24, 2009

Be on the lookout for Brood XIV stragglers?

Filed under: Brood XIV | Magicicada | Periodical Stragglers — Dan @ 6:23 am

Be on the lookout for Brood XIV stragglers. A few Magicicada that didn’t emerge in 2008 should appear in 2009! Keep your eyes and ears peeled.

April 18, 2009

Cicada Pull Toy

Filed under: Roy Troutman | Toys and Amusements — Dan @ 1:27 pm

Today I found this cicada-shaped toy in my mail.

Cicada Toy

Thanks Roy Troutman!

April 11, 2009

Fantastic Magicicada Tattoo

Filed under: Tattoos — Dan @ 7:46 am


3-22-2009-1, originally uploaded by Kate loves vee dubs.

Take a look at Kate’s Magicicada tattoo. It is fantastic!

March 16, 2009

New Cicada Photos from Santisuk Vibul in Thailand.

Filed under: Anatomy | Thailand — Dan @ 8:25 pm

New Cicada Photos from Santisuk Vibul in Thailand.

New cicada photos from Santisuk Vibul’s in Thailand.

February 28, 2009

Cicada Products

Filed under: Pop Culture — Dan @ 1:21 pm

Thanks to Roy for this link to wholesale manufacturers and their cicada-related goods. My favorite is the Canned Jinchan.

JINCHAN

February 19, 2009

Cyphonia trifida (Membracidae), Venezuela

Filed under: News — Dan @ 10:23 pm

This is not a cicada, but it looks like one, right? Like a cicada from Mars. This is a Treehopper (Membracidae). They belong to the same Order/Suborder & Infraorder as Cicadas (more info on the Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Membracidae)

January 19, 2009

Bagpipe Cicada

Filed under: Australia | David Emery | Lembeja — Tags: , — Dan @ 6:35 pm

This is a photo of the amazing Bagpipe cicada (Lembeja paradoxa) was taken by Timothy Emery (David Emery’s son).

Attached is a photo taken by my son, Timothy Emery from Thursday Island, Torres Strait off Cape York, Queensland. This a male “bagpipe cicada” (Lembeja paradoxa) singing for his female. These guys at rest look like dead leaves with wings folded under stems of grass, but when singing at dusk, rush up the stems and can expand their abdomens incredibly up to 5-10 x resting size (hence the bagpipe bit) and emit a very loud droning sound for their size. A great emergence of these on Thursday Island in the first 2 weeks of January.

Lembeja paradoxa (Karsch, 1890)

The Bagpipe cicada can be found in the Northern tip of Queensland, from October to February, but they’re most common during January. (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p. 178)

delicious cicadas

Filed under: Eating Cicadas — Dan @ 1:17 pm


delicious cicadas, originally uploaded by istolethetv.

Cicadas: it’s what’s for dinner!

January 15, 2009

Versatile Aggressive Mimicry of Cicadas by an Australian Predatory Katydid

Filed under: Australia | David Marshall | Kathy Hill — Dan @ 10:34 pm

David Marshall and Kathy Hill have discovered that a particular species of katydid mimics the wing-flick of female cicadas to lure male cicadas to their certain doom.

We have found that predatory Chlorobalius leucoviridis katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) can attract male cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) by imitating the species-specific wing-flick replies of sexually receptive female cicadas. This aggressive mimicry is accomplished both acoustically, with tegminal clicks, and visually, with synchronized body jerks. Remarkably, the katydids respond effectively to a variety of complex, species-specific Cicadettini songs, including songs of many cicada species that the predator has never encountered.

Read the entire research article: Versatile Aggressive Mimicry of Cicadas by an Australian Predatory Katydid.

« Newer PostsMore »

Cicada T-shirts