Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

April 13, 2011

It’s on! The first Brood XIX Magicicada cicada sightings

Filed under: Brood XIX — Dan @ 5:13 am

Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org) reported on Facebook that they’ve received their first two Brood XIX sightings. You can see where on their site (check their 2011 Brood XIX sightings map).

Have you seen a cicada, and not reported it yet?

Here’s what to look for to get ready:

Look for holes in soil. Holes about the diameter of man’s finger. This is a sign that nymphs have dug their way to the surface in preparation to emerge:

Cicada holes

Magicicada holes

Magicicada holes

Also Look for cicada chimneys, aka turrets. These are similar to holes in that the nymphs are coming to the surface in preparation to emerge. The cicadas build these structures out of soil where their tunnels meet the surface.

Magicicada chimneys

Look for cicada nymphs. This is what Magicicada nymphs look like. They’re golden-brown, they have six prominent legs, and red eyes.

Magicicada nymphs

Look for adults. The guy at the top-right side of every Cicada Mania page is a Magicicada. You’ll also find hundreds of Magicicada photos in our gallery on this site.

April 7, 2011

Magicicada nymph 12 day transformation before final molt!

Filed under: Magicicada — Dan @ 7:16 pm

Roy Troutman provided this video featuring a Magicicada nymph 12 day transformation before final molt. It’s an excellent view of what nymphs look like right before they emerge from the ground and become adults.

Magicicada nymph 12 day transformation before final molt! from Roy Troutman on Vimeo.

April 5, 2011

The Cicadidae of Japan. Cicada book of the year?

Filed under: Books | Japan — Dan @ 4:37 am

It’s too early to say, but The Cicadidae of Japan might end up being the cicada book of the year. The book was authored by Dr. M. Haysashi and Dr. Yasumasa Saisho (of the incredible Cicadidae of Japan website), and it includes photos and a CD of cicada song.

The book is currently available from Amazon.co.jp.

Information from Dr. Yasumasa Saisho:

Hello. I inform you that “The Cicadidae of Japan” by Dr. M.Hayashi and
myself is published. This book consists of taxonomic exposition, ecological
information, distribution, acoustic attribute of calling songs,
morphological features of Japanese cicadidae with many photos and CD
(including all songs of Japanese species, about 70min).

———-
M. Hayashi and Y. Saisho (2011). The Cicadidae of Japan,
224 pp., Seibundo-shinkosha, Tokyo.
ISBN978-4-416-81114-6
4,600yen

M. Hayashi and Y. Saisho (2011). The Cicadidae of Japan

March 22, 2011

Cicada Mania Twitter

Filed under: Cicada Mania — Dan @ 3:22 pm

I’ve been “tweeting” the latest cicada news on Twitter. Follow Cicada Mania on Twitter

March 19, 2011

Wanted: Brood XIX Cicadas

Filed under: Brood XIX — Dan @ 11:00 am

The temperature got into the 80s for a few days in a row in Georgia. I’m wondering if a few Magicicadas made an appearance.

Cicadas Wanted!

March 12, 2011

A Brood XIX Periodical Cicada Primer

Filed under: Brood XIX | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 4:45 pm

Brood XIX (19) will next emerge in 2024.

This page has last updated in 2011.

What are they?

Magicicada is a genus of periodical cicadas known for emerging in massive numbers in 17 or 13-year cycles/periods. The cicadas emerging in 2011 have 13 year life-cycles. Magicicada cicadas are also organized into broods. There are 3 broods of 13-year cicadas, and the brood emerging in 2011 is Brood XIX (nineteen).

There are 4 species of 13-year Magicicada: M. tredecim, M. neotredecim, M. tredecassini and M. tredecula. The adults of all four species have black bodies with orange markings and red-orange eyes. M. tredecim and M. neotredecim are very similar, and you can only tell them apart by their song in areas where their ranges overlap (or by looking at DNA). They are, however, larger than M. tredecassini and M. tredecula, and have a noticeably different song.

Visit this Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org) species page for detailed information, including photos and audio.

Here is some video and audio of 17 year Magicicada, which look and sound remarkably similar to the 13 year variety. This will give you an idea of what to expect:

Cicada Mania, best of 2007, part 1 by Dan from Cicada Mania on Vimeo.

Note: some folks call these cicadas “locusts”, but they are not true locusts.

When will they emerge?

The Brood XIX Magicadas will emerge this spring. When they emerge depends on the weather. Generally speaking, once the ground temperature gets to 64º Fahrenheit (18º C) around 8″ (20 cm) deep they will emerge. There’s an emergence formula too. Brood XIX cicadas in Georgia will most likely emerge before the cicadas in Illinois, for example, because Georgia is typically warmer than Illinois.

Where will they emerge?

Historically, Brood XIX has emerged in as many as 14 states. The emergence will cover the most area in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Missouri, and Tennessee. Other states like Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, and South Carolina should have strong emergences in limited areas, and states like Indiana, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Virginia will have very limited emergences.

Important: Magicicadas won’t emerge everywhere you see on the map below. They might not exist in your town or neighborhood (particularly if there’s lots of new construction, which removes trees). The key to seeing them if they don’t emerge in your neighborhood is communication: networking with friends and family, checking the interactive maps on magicicada.org, checking sites like Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

Marlatt 1907 19 Brood XIX
1907 map from Marlatt, C.L.. 1907. The periodical cicada. Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology.

States:

  1. mid to northern Alabama
  2. Arkansas
  3. northern Georgia
  4. mid to southern Illinois
  5. south-western Indiana
  6. west Kentucky
  7. northern Louisiana
  8. Missouri
  9. mid to northern Mississippi
  10. North Carolina
  11. western Oklahoma
  12. north-west South Carolina
  13. Tennessee
  14. random places in Virginia

Why?

Why do Magicadas wait 13 years and why do they emerge in such large numbers? There are many theories why, but the primary reason could be that they’re trying to beat the predators. Since they emerge only once every 13 years, no species can anticipate their emergence (except man), and emerging in large numbers ensures that at least some of them will survive to reproduce.

Who?

People have many reactions to Magicicada including: fear, disgust, panic, mild curiosity, fascination, and fanaticism. We hope that YOU will find them fascinating, and get involved by helping to map the emergence, upload your cicada photos and videos to sites like YouTube and Flickr, and participate in discussions on Twitter and discussion forums.

More information:

March 10, 2011

More Cicadas from Brazil to ID

Filed under: Brazil | Video — Dan @ 10:37 am

A few more mystery cicadas from Jairo from the Cigarras do Brasil — Brazilian Cicadas website. These cicadas are from Brazil. This time with videos featuring their song.

Cicada A:

“Now i’m sending you a video of a strange cicada song, very highly pitched, and two blurry photos of it. Sorry i couldn’t take better pictures (they’re very small and hard to catch), but i hope it can help you.
As far as i could see, this cicada seems to belong to the genus Taphura. I saw some cicadas of this genus and it really loks like them (if only the pictures showed that…). They have a green head and mesonotum, but the abdomen has a different color, probably beige or brown. Their belly seem to be white, with beige legs. Their song starts with clicks from a male, then another male responds to it, and then all males in the place sing together a very fast buzz. Probably i recorded here their “alarm call”, to warn the others about the presence of a stranger, ’cause their song was very erratic.”

Images of this cicada (yeah, they’re not the best quality):

Jairo

Jairo

Cicada B:

“This one really gets me intrigued! Never saw the cicada (that’s why i don’t have pics), but i’ve heard it a lot! Very low sound, this song is a succession of short calls (ki-ki-ki-ki). Males singing together seem to be duelling. All i can say is it seems to be from genus Dorisiana, but without pictures i cannot prove this.
This one is really a challenge.”

Cicada C:

“I made this recording in October 5th 2010 (spring), and you can hear the second part of a cicada song (i couldn’t record the first part). The song starts with a slow sequence of short calls (ki-ki-ki), and then it accelerates and becomes a fast sequence of zizizi sounds. People will say that it sounds like Fidicina mannifera or F. torresi, but i know these two species enough to say that it wasn’t any of them, along with the fact that they don’t sing in trees as high as the one in the footage. Could it be Majeorona aper??? They appear in springtime, and i don’t know their song!”

March 9, 2011

Help identify these Cicadas from Brazil

Filed under: Brazil — Dan @ 5:51 pm

Jairo from the very cool Cigarras do Brasil – Brazilian Cicadas website asked us to help identify five cicadas from Brazil.

Updated on 3/19 with new images.

If you can ID any of them, let us know in the Comments.

Image 1:

002: Green cicada with size about 1,5cm, probably genus Carineta. No song recorded

“002: Green cicada with size about 1,5cm, probably genus Carineta. No song recorded:”

New image

Jairo Green Cicada

“people said this is not Carineta (even if it seems to be it for me), so i’m sending a photo from another angle (same green cicada). Sure this is not a Fidicina. Photo taken in brazilian late summer (march 04, 2011).”

Image 2:

SL370390: This one was found singing in the grass (its song sounds like a Tibicen auriferus). Its size is about 1,7cm (3/4 in). Color dark green with yellow spots (including the veins in the wings).

“SL370390: This one was found singing in the grass (its song sounds like a Tibicen auriferus). Its size is about 1,7cm (3/4 in). Color dark green with yellow spots (including the veins in the wings).:”

New Image:

SL370390: This one was found singing in the grass (its song sounds like a Tibicen auriferus). Its size is about 1,7cm (3/4 in). Color dark green with yellow spots (including the veins in the wings).

“SL370343: People said this is Proarna, but are they sure? This cicada didn’t finish the molting process. If it’s so, the grass cicada is Proarna too. October 04, 2010.”

Image 3:

SL370337: This one has just left its exuvia, so it was not molted yet. But it sings like a Tibicen davisi, and its size is about 2cm. They usually sing high up in trees

“SL370337: This one has just left its exuvia, so it was not molted yet. But it sings like a Tibicen davisi, and its size is about 2cm. They usually sing high up in trees”

New image:

SL370387: got terrible pictures of this tiny cicada, but i can say the "M" mark on the back of it is yellow, same as the wing veins. Its belly is white, except in the middle of the abdomen, which is light brown. Same as SL370390, sings on the grass. Check the date on the picture (mid spring).

“SL370387: got terrible pictures of this tiny cicada, but i can say the “M” mark on the back of it is yellow, same as the wing veins. Its belly is white, except in the middle of the abdomen, which is light brown. Same as SL370390, sings on the grass. Check the date on the picture (mid spring).”

Image 5:

020: Not sure, but could probably be the same as SL370337 (with the difference that this one is dead).

“020: Not sure, but could probably be the same as SL370337 (with the difference that this one is dead).”

New image

004: dorsal view - better angles for the dead cicada, so you can check the belly. If the two previous cicadas are Proarna, this one should be too, i'm sure they belong to the same genus.

“004: dorsal view – better angles for the dead cicada, so you can check the belly. If the two previous cicadas are Proarna, this one should be too, i’m sure they belong to the same genus.”

New image:

005: better angles for the dead cicada, so you can check the belly. If the two previous cicadas are Proarna, this one should be too, i'm sure they belong to the same genus.

“005: better angles for the dead cicada, so you can check the belly. If the two previous cicadas are Proarna, this one should be too, i’m sure they belong to the same genus.”

Image 4:

DSF0993: gray color with black spots, excellent camouflage, size about 1 inch (2,5cm), song starts with clicks and then sounds like a plane turbine (i'll send you video later). It lasts about 20 seconds

“DSF0993: gray color with black spots, excellent camouflage, size about 1 inch (2,5cm), song starts with clicks and then sounds like a plane turbine (i’ll send you video later). It lasts about 20 seconds”

January 11, 2011

Greek Entomythology by Artemis Ippotis

Filed under: Books | Pop Culture — Dan @ 9:55 pm

Here’s something fun for fans of entomology, Greek mythology and creativity: Greek Entomythology by Artemis Ippotis. Artemis (Diana Knight) has created a fun and whimsical book that tells Greek myths using photos of insects. The book is truly one of a kind! Artemis is also planing on offering the book as an iPad/iPhone app.

If you’re interesting in obtaining the book, write Diana at:

Diana Knight
The Manor,
Barton Mills,
Suffolk IP 28 6BL
UK

The book features some of my Tibicen photos. I laughed out loud when I saw the Tibicen playing a lyre.

Greek Entomythology by Artemis Ippotis

New, here’s a video promo for the book:

Mecklenburg County Brood XIX Magicicada Monitoring Project

Filed under: Brood XIX | Magicicada — Dan @ 9:29 pm

Brood XIX 13 year cicadas will be emerging this year in the USA, and folks are already making plans for the emergence.

Lenny Lampel, Natural Resources Coordinator for the Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Conservation Science Office in Charlotte, North Carolina, is organizing a “Cicada Watch” / Brood XIX Magicicada Monitoring Project. Read an article about Cicada Watch in the Charlotte Observer: Cicadas return – and you can make it count.

If you live in the Mechlenburg County area, and are interested in participating in Cicada Watch, here is more information:

Cicada Watch
Mecklenburg County Brood XIX Magicicada Monitoring Project

Brood XIX, a 13-year brood (or year-class) of periodical cicadas, is set to emerge in 2011. Known as the “Great Southern Brood”, this emergence of cicadas is expected to appear in portions of 15 states. In North Carolina, the cicadas should emerge across much of the piedmont region, including the greater Charlotte
area.

Periodical cicadas appear to be declining in parts of their range throughout the eastern United States, and some broods are now thought to be extinct. Impacts such as development, habitat changes and climatological factors may be contributing to these declines.

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation’s Division of Nature Preserves and Natural Resources will be collecting data on the emergence of Brood XIX in Mecklenburg County in the Spring of 2011. The help of volunteers and local residents is needed to obtain baseline data on emergence locations and areas of activity within the county. Some of these areas will be monitored throughout the emergence period and can be re-visited in future emergence years to determine whether or not local populations are stable. Data collected during this Cicada Watch will help us to understand the status and future of Brood XIX in Mecklenburg
County.

Volunteers Needed!

Cicada Watch volunteers can assist in any of the following activities:

1. Observe their property and neighborhood for periodical cicada activity and report findings to staff
2. Survey areas of the county where emergences may be expected
3. Collect routine monitoring data from active locations throughout the emergence period
4. Follow up on leads of periodical cicada activity, such as reports of exit holes, emerging nymphs, shed skins, or active adults

For more information or to sign up as a volunteer, please contact :
Lenny Lampel, Natural Resources Coordinator
Phone #: 704-432-1390 E-mail: lenny.lampel@mecklenburgcountync.gov

« Newer PostsMore »

Cicada T-shirts