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April 17, 2016

Common cicadas of Pennsylvania

Filed under: United States — Tags: — Dan @ 7:43 pm

Annual cicadas of Pennsylvania (PA):

All cicadas appear every year unless otherwise noted.

Megatibicen grossus (Fabricius, 1775) aka Northern Dusk Singing Cicada formerly Megatibicen auletes

Northern Dusk Singing Cicada

Neotibicen canicularis (Harris, 1841) aka Dog-day Cicada

Dog-day Cicada

Neotibicen davisi davisi (Smith and Grossbeck, 1907) aka Davis’ Southeastern Dog-Day Cicada

Davis' Southeastern Dog-Day Cicada

Neotibicen linnei (Smith and Grossbeck, 1907) aka Linne’s Cicada

Linne's Cicada

Neotibicen lyricen engelhardti (Davis, 1910) aka Dark Lyric Cicada

Dark Lyric Cicada

Neotibicen lyricen lyricen (De Geer, 1773) aka Lyric Cicada

Lyric Cicada

Neotibicen pruinosus pruinosus (Say, 1825) aka Scissor(s) Grinder

Scissor(s) Grinder

Neotibicen robinsonianus Davis, 1922 aka Robinson’s Annual Cicada or Robinson’s Cicada

Neotibicen tibicen tibicen (Linnaeus, 1758) aka Swamp Cicada, Morning Cicada

Swamp Cicada, Morning Cicada

Neotibicen winnemanna (Davis, 1912) aka Eastern Scissor(s) Grinder

Eastern Scissor(s) Grinder

Okanagana canadensis (Provancher, 1889) aka Canadian Cicada

Canadian Cicada

Okanagana rimosa rimosa (Say, 1830) aka Say’s Cicada

Say's Cicada

Periodical cicadas of Pennsylvania (PA):

Magicicada cassinii (Fisher, 1852) aka Cassini Periodical Cicada or 17-Year Cicada

These cicadas will next emerge in 2025 (Brood XIV), 2030 (Brood II), 2033 (Brood V), 2036 (Brood XIII). They often emerge 1 or 4 years earlier than expected.

Cassini Periodical Cicada or 17-Year Cicada

Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758) aka Decim Periodical Cicada or Linnaeus’s 17-Year Cicada or 17-Year Cicada

These cicadas will next emerge in 2025 (Brood XIV), 2030 (Brood II), 2033 (Brood V), 2036 (Brood XIII). They often emerge 1 or 4 years earlier than expected.

Decim Periodical Cicada or Linnaeus's 17-Year Cicada or 17-Year Cicada

Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962 aka Decula Periodical Cicdada or 17-Year Cicada

These cicadas will next emerge in 2025 (Brood XIV), 2030 (Brood II), 2033 (Brood V), 2036 (Brood XIII). They often emerge 1 or 4 years earlier than expected.

Decula Periodical Cicdada or 17-Year Cicada

Related articles

  1. Jim Thorpe Pennsylvania Magicicada Emergence Gallery
  2. Brood VIII will emerge in 2019 in Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia
  3. Jim Thorpe Pennsylvania Magicicada Emergence
  4. My Brood VIII Report
  5. Periodical cicada Brood X (10) will emerge in 15 states in 2021
  6. Periodical cicada Brood XIV (14) will emerge in 2025 in Thirteen States

Name and Location References:

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names & locations: BugGuide.net; iNaturalist.com; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; my personal memory.
  3. Locations: Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico by Allen F. Sanborn and Polly K. Phillips.
  4. List of species with MAPs: Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico [PDF] by Allen F. Sanborn and Polly K. Phillips. Download it once; treasure it forever.

6 Comments »

  1. Christie Stallone says:

    I’m looking for an actual schedule.
    I was pregnant in 1992. When Mifflin county had the largest cicada emergence that I have ever seen in my life. And being as I loved to hunt grasshoppers as a kid and noticed these things… it says a lot. I want to see years and adjacent broods. I’m looking for an actual schedule. I want to know when that emergence is happening again

  2. My yard is full of holes for the first time ever. I am in McKean County PA (NWPA) and am pretty sure we are not expecting a major cicada outbreak this year. I haven’t seen anything yet. But I am watching closely.

    Any chance the 2025 brood is emerging early?

    1. Dan says:

      Interesting. Let us know if cicadas emerge. I believe your county had Brood XIV at one point (see map https://cicadas.uconn.edu/brood_14/) but they may (or may not have) gone extinct.

  3. Kevin Stewart says:

    A question regarding your “Annual cicadas of PA”:
    I have a specimen of what I’m pretty sure is Neotibicen canicularis, but its thoracic markings may not be *perfectly* the same as in photo you’ve shown. It’s much closer to that than the others, anyway.
    Can I rely on “the closest photo” being sufficient to identify a PA cicada, or are these images to be regarded only as examples, but not as prescriptions for what specimens must exactly look like?

    1. Dan says:

      There’s variation in colors and patterns when it comes to Neotibicen cicadas.

      N. canicularis colors/patterns vary quite a bit on the dorsal side, but on the ventral side, they’re white on the sides and black down the middle. The operculum of the makes are beige and black.
      N. davisi davisi is similar, but no black on the operculum, and the black down the middle is narrow.
      N linnei is white on the sides, black down the middle, and black and white on the operculum.
      N. pruinosis is white on the sides, black & tan down the middle, with white & tan operculum.
      N. winnemanna has a little white on the sides, lots of black & tan down the middle, with mostly tan operculum.

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