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May 26, 2010

Brood III cicadas are emerging too!

Filed under: Brood III | Gene Kritsky | Magicicada — Dan @ 9:28 pm

Gene Kritsky wrote us to let us know that Brood III periodical cicadas are emerging in Iowa and Missouri.

Dan,

I wanted to let you know that I have received emails with reports of
emerging periodical cicadas in Iowa and northern Missouri in Brood III
territory. These cicadas would be emerging four years early similar to
the early emergences observed in 2000, 2003, 2004, and 2009.

Cheers,
Gene

It’s been an interesting year so far, with Brood III stragglers emerging 4 years early, Brood XIV emerging 2 years late, and Brood XIX emerging 1 year early.

Check our Brood Chart to see where the next batch of periodical cicadas might emerge.

Check Cicadas @ UCONN for maps.

May 20, 2010

Anapsaltoda pulchra – Golden Emperors

Filed under: Anapsaltoda | Australia | David Emery | Psaltodini — Tags: — Dan @ 9:23 pm

David Emery emailed us this amazing photo of Anapsaltoda pulchra cicadas. Anapsaltoda pulchra are also known as Golden Emperors. These cicadas are from Herberton, Queensland, Australia.

Anapsaltoda pulchra - Golden Emperors. Photo by David Emery.

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Psaltodini
SubTribe: ?
Genus: Anapsaltoda
Species: Anapsaltoda pulchra (Ashton, 1921)

References

Tribe (Psaltodini) information comes from: MARSHALL, DAVID C. et al.A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification.Zootaxa, [S.l.], v. 4424, n. 1, p. 1—64, may 2018. ISSN 1175-5334. Available at: https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4424.1.1

January 8, 2010

Diceroprocta viridifascia (Walker, 1850)

Diceroprocta viridifascia aka the Salt Marsh Cicada can be found in AL, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.

Song type: Call


Source: ©Insect Singers | Species: D. viridifascia

Song type: Call


Source: ©Joe Green | Species: D. viridifascia

These videos feature the call of the D. viridifascia.

Name, Location and Description

Classification:

Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadinae
Tribe: Cryptotympanini
Subtribe: Cryptotympanina
Genus: Diceroprocta
Species: Diceroprocta viridifascia (Walker, 1850)

List of sources

  1. Full Binomial Names: ITIS.gov
  2. Common names: BugGuide.net; The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliott and Wil Herschberger; personal memory.
  3. Locations: Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico by Allen F. Sanborn and Polly K. Phillips.
  4. Descriptions, Colors: personal observations from specimens or photos from many sources. Descriptions are not perfect, but may be helpful.

Notes:

  • Some descriptions are based on aged specimens which have lost some or a lot of their color.

November 27, 2009

Cystosoma saundersii (bladder cicada)

Filed under: Australia | Cystosoma | David Emery — Tags: , — Dan @ 9:22 pm

David Emery send us a photo of a Cystosoma saundersii (bladder cicada) from Australia and we added it to the gallery.

Just to complement the Aussie cicadas, a small colony of these Cystosoma saundersii have been droning and rattling at dusk around Burwoood in Sydney for the past 2 months. This is their southern-most extension down the east coast of Australia.
cheers,
David.

Click the link above or the image below to access large versions of the image.

Bladder cicadas (Cystosoma saundersii)

More information about Cystosoma saundersii on the CSIRO site.

The Bladder Cicada can be sound in eastern Queensland & NSW, and are most common Nov-Jan. (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p. 193.)

Here’s a photo of a diseased specimen:

Bladder Cicada

January 19, 2009

Bagpipe Cicada

Filed under: Australia | David Emery | Lembeja — Tags: , — Dan @ 6:35 pm

This is a photo of the amazing Bagpipe cicada (Lembeja paradoxa) was taken by Timothy Emery (David Emery’s son).

Attached is a photo taken by my son, Timothy Emery from Thursday Island, Torres Strait off Cape York, Queensland. This a male “bagpipe cicada” (Lembeja paradoxa) singing for his female. These guys at rest look like dead leaves with wings folded under stems of grass, but when singing at dusk, rush up the stems and can expand their abdomens incredibly up to 5-10 x resting size (hence the bagpipe bit) and emit a very loud droning sound for their size. A great emergence of these on Thursday Island in the first 2 weeks of January.

Lembeja paradoxa (Karsch, 1890)

The Bagpipe cicada can be found in the Northern tip of Queensland, from October to February, but they’re most common during January. (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p. 178)

January 15, 2009

Versatile Aggressive Mimicry of Cicadas by an Australian Predatory Katydid

Filed under: Australia | David Marshall | Kathy Hill — Dan @ 10:34 pm

David Marshall and Kathy Hill have discovered that a particular species of katydid mimics the wing-flick of female cicadas to lure male cicadas to their certain doom.

We have found that predatory Chlorobalius leucoviridis katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) can attract male cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) by imitating the species-specific wing-flick replies of sexually receptive female cicadas. This aggressive mimicry is accomplished both acoustically, with tegminal clicks, and visually, with synchronized body jerks. Remarkably, the katydids respond effectively to a variety of complex, species-specific Cicadettini songs, including songs of many cicada species that the predator has never encountered.

Read the entire research article: Versatile Aggressive Mimicry of Cicadas by an Australian Predatory Katydid.

June 10, 2008

New Brood XIV Photos from Roy

Filed under: Brood XIV | Gene Kritsky | Roy Troutman — Dan @ 7:58 pm

An adult Magicicada:

Magicicada

A Magicicada suffering from the massospora cicadina fungus:

Magicicada with Fungus

The fungus is spread during mating.

Another shot of the adult Magicicada:

Magicicada

A Magicicada suffering from the massospora cicadina fungus:

Magicicada with Fungus

Gene Kritsky collecting a temperature probe for his cicada temperature study from Roy’s backyard:

Gene Kritsky

June 4, 2008

BBC Filming in Mariemont

Filed under: Brood XIV | Gene Kritsky | Roy Troutman — Dan @ 9:56 am

I’m catching up on the photos Roy Troutman has sent me.

Here’s photos from a BBC photoshoot in Mariemont Ohio, taken on May 24th. The photos feature cicada expert Gene Kritsky.

BBC Filming in Mariemont

BBC Filming in Mariemont

BBC Filming in Mariemont

BBC Filming in Mariemont

April 12, 2008

2008 Cicada Temperature Study

Filed under: Brood XIV | Gene Kritsky | Magicicada | Roy Troutman — Dan @ 7:21 am

Roy Troutman sent me these photos of temperature loggers that allow cicada experts, like Gene Kritsky, to measure the ground soil temperature, and improve their formulas for predicting Magicicada emergences.

We [Gene Kristsky and Roy Troutman] buried 3 temperature probes & tied one on a tree branch for air readings. The temperature loggers will take a very accurate reading every 10 minutes & after the emergence has started in full swing Gene will dig them up & hook them to a usb cable & download all the data to his laptop for study. He [Gene] is trying to determine the exact temperature that they will emerge so he can fine tune his formula for calculating emergence times.

Last year Gene’s emergence formula calculator (try it!) did a good job of predicting the Brood XIII emergence, and the 2008 temperature study should only improve it.

You might be able to participate in the 2008 cicada temperature study. If you’re interested, contact Gene Kritsky.

Temperature Logger

Temperature Logger

December 20, 2007

Diemeniana euronotiana

Filed under: Australia | David Emery | Diemeniana — Tags: — Dan @ 9:17 pm

Here’s yet another wonderful cicada photo from David Emery in Australia: the Diemeniana euronotiana. The cicada is a mere 20mm in length, and they are now just out in the bushland around 1000m.

Diemeniana euronotiana

The Diemeniana euronotiana can be found in eastern NSW, south-eastern Victoria and Tasmania. They are most common in late November to January. (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p. 112)

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