Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

May 31, 2017

Neotibicen similaris apalachicola, a new cicada subspecies

Filed under: David Marshall | Kathy Hill | Neotibicen | Papers and Documents | United States — Tags: — Dan @ 6:28 am

A new subspecies of the Similar Dog-Day Cicada has been described in the paper A new Neotibicen cicada subspecies (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) from the southeastern USA forms hybrid zones with a widespread relative despite a divergent male calling song by David C. Marshall and Kathy B. R. Hill (Zootaxa, Vol 4272, No 4). The cicada is named Neotibicen similaris apalachicola.

This cicada lives in Florida, Georgia & Alabama, and hybridizes with the other Similar Dog-Day Cicada sub-speces, Neotibicen similaris similaris. The document is available on biotaxa.org.

A morphologically cryptic subspecies of Neotibicen similaris (Smith and Grossbeck) is described from forests of the Apalachicola region of the southeastern United States. Although the new form exhibits a highly distinctive male calling song, it hybridizes extensively where it meets populations of the nominate subspecies in parapatry, by which it is nearly surrounded. This is the first reported example of hybridization between North American nonperiodical cicadas. Acoustic and morphological characters are added to the original description of the nominate subspecies, and illustrations of complex hybrid song phenotypes are presented. The biogeography of N. similaris is discussed in light of historical changes in forest composition on the southeastern Coastal Plain.

You will find song samples and maps on the Insect Singers website.

I think this is an image of the new cicada:

July 23, 2016

New paper catalogs the cicadas of India, India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal and Sri Lanka

Filed under: India | Papers and Documents — Dan @ 6:09 am

A paper titled The cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal and Sri Lanka: an annotated provisional catalogue, regional checklist and bibliography was published in June of 2016 in the Biodiversity Data Journal 4: e8051. The authors of the document include, Benjamin Wills Price, Elizabeth Louise Allan, Kiran Marathe, Vivek Sarkar, Chris Simon, Krushnamegh Kunte, but I think Ben was the lead.

You can access it here: http://bdj.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=8051

Quotes from the abstract:

Background

The cicadas of the Indian subcontinent, like many other insects in the region, have remained understudied since the early part of the 20th Century, and await modern taxonomic, systematic and phylogenetic treatment. This paper presents an updated systematic catalogue of cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) from India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal and Sri Lanka, the first in over a century.

New information

This paper treats 281 species, including: India and Bangladesh (189 species), Bhutan (19 species), Myanmar (81 species), Nepal (46 species) and Sri Lanka (22 species). For each species all recognized junior synonyms are included with information on the type material and additional specimens where relevant.

For images of the cicada described in the document, head on over to the Cicadas of India website.

July 5, 2016

Color the cicada and the cicada killer wasp

Filed under: Cicada Killer Wasps | Papers and Documents — Dan @ 7:42 pm

Today I was searching old news papers for cicada information, and I came across a gem from the past.

One of the papers (New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) September 21, 1902, Image 43) I found features an illustration of a cicada being carried off by a cicada killer wasp. The illustration appeared in the kids section of the paper and was meant to be colored.

In Insect Land NY Tribune 1902

The cicada is referred to as a “Harvest Fly”, which indicates that it is a member of the genus Neotibicen (back in 1902 I think the genus was either called Cicada or Tibicen). Judging by the description of the cicada it is likely a Neotibicen tibicen tibicen aka the Swamp Cicada.

Instructions for coloring the insects:

Directions for coloring-. Body black, with a dark
green band just back of the head, and two round
white spots on the first ring- or segment of the
abdomen. The eyes, legs and antennas are green.
The veins of the wings are green near the tody,
gradually shading into black at the tips. The
wings are transparent. The wasp, which is carry
ing off a dead harvest fly, is brown-the color of
bronze. The pupa or young harvest fly in the tree
is brown also. The tree trunk is dark brown; the
grass green.

The harvest fly, or cicada, often incorrectly called
locust is usually the herald of hot weather. He
comes out in August, and the hotter the day the
more energetically he sings. He is own cousin to
the seventeen-year cicada, and it takes him two
years to reach his growth. He begins life as a
Uny egg bidden away by his mother under the
bark of sum.- tree. Who, he hatches out a tiny
grub, he begins eating Into his surroundings and
often does much damage. Soon he changes to a
pupa, and falls to the ground, i” which he imme
diately buries himself. Here he remains for two

October 6, 2013

Cicada Papers and Documents, PDFs and Images

Filed under: Papers and Documents | Websites — Dan @ 1:41 am

Visit Tim McNary’s Bibliography of the Cicadoidea for many, many more cicada papers and articles.

Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico

Author: Allen F. Sanborn 1, and Polly K. Phillips (2013)

North American Cicadas. Features maps. “Abstract: We describe and illustrate the biogeography of the cicadas inhabiting continental North America, north of Mexico. Species distributions were determined through our collecting efforts as well as label data from more than 110 institutional collections.”

File located on cicadamania.com.

North American cicadas (1921)

Author: Davis, William T. (William Thompson), 1862-1945; New York Entomological Society. Journal

North American Cicadas

File located on archive.org.

A monograph of oriental cicadidae (1892)

Author: Distant, William Lucas, 1845-1922

Cicadas of India, Southeast Asia and China

File located on archive.org.

Centre for Entomological Studies Ankara, Cesa News Nr. 55 (January 30, 2010)

Cicadidae of Turkey and some ecological notes on Tibicina serhadensis Kocak & Kemal from Van Province (East Turkey) (Homoptera) — Author: Muhabbet Kemal, Ahmet Omer Kocak, Vildan Bozaci

Cicadas of Turkey

File located on archive.org.

The Periodical Cicada (1907)

Author: C. L. Marlatt

Magicicada periodical cicadas

File located on archive.org.

The periodical cicada in 1914 (1914)

Author: United States. Bureau of Entomology; Marlatt, C. L

Magicicada periodical cicadas

File located on archive.org.

Les Cicadines d’Europe : d’après les originaux et les plus récentes (1875)

Fieber, Franz Xaver, 1807-1872; Metcalf Collection (North Carolina State University). NCRS

Cicadas of Europe

File located on archive.org.

Insecta. Rhynchota. Hemiptera-Homoptera. Volume I (1881-1905)

W. L. Distant and W. W. Fowler

Cicadas of Central and South America

File located on www.sil.si.edu.

Emergence of Prime Numbers as the Result of Evolutionary Strategy (PDF)

Prof. Douglas Galvao of the State University of Campinas

Magicicada periodical cicadas

File located on cicadamania.com.

Genera of American cicadas north of Mexico (1978)

Author: Heath, Maxine Shoemaker

Genera of American cicadas north of Mexico. Note a more recent book (scroll up) has been published in 2013.

File located on archive.org.

Dictionnaire universel d’histoire naturelle: atlas (1861)

Author: Orbigny, Charles Dessalines d’, 1806-1876; Metcalf Collection (North Carolina State University). NCRS

Contains a few cicada illustrations including a Tacua sp.

File located on archive.org.

December 30, 2012

Tosena Cicadas

Filed under: Oriental Cicadidae | Tosena | Tosenini | W. L. Distant — Dan @ 9:56 am

Tosena is a genus of cicadas that can be found in the Indo-Malaya ecozone, which includes the Indian subcontinent, Southeastern Asia and southern China. Tosena cicadas have colorful wings, which rival the beauty of butterfly wings. Tosena are easily obtainable online from stores that sell insects, or ebay. The Tosena genus was first identified by Charles Jean-Baptiste Amyot & Jean Guillaume Audinet-Serville in 1843.

From A Monograph of Oriental Cicadidae by W. L. Distant:

Tosena is one of the most conspicuous genera of the Cicadidae, and its species are all included in this fauna. The north-eastern districts of Continental India are its head-quarters, for here are focused some of the largest and handsomest of its species ; it is also well represented in Burma, and from thence its distribution is extended throughout the Malay Peninsula to the south, and apparently northward as far as some portions of China. In the Malayan Archipelago it is not uncommon in Sumatra, Java, and Borneo, and as I have seen representatives from Amboyna, it probably exists in other intervening islands, of which, however, we have at present no precise information.

Different types of Tosena:

Tosena albata:

Tosena albata
Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Photos of live T. albata.

Distinguishing features: Mustard colored pronotal collar, orange abdomen with a series of two black circular spots, and dark brown wings with one white stripe on each fore wing.

Habitat: Southeast Asia.

Tosena depicta:

Tosena depicta
Illustration from A Monograph of Oriental Cicadidae by W. L. Distant.

Photos of living T. depicta.

Distinguishing features: A vibrant green pronotal collar; an orange abdomen with a series of black markings; wings are dark brown to black, with the one white stripe on each fore wing, and a white anal lobe on each hind wing.

Phantastic songs of the S.E. Asian cicadas! website has an MP3 of a T. depicta singing.

Habitat: Southeast Asia.

Tosena fasciata

Tosena fasciata by Álvaro Lisón Gómez
Tosena fasciata by Álvaro Lisón Gómez Creative Commons License.

Photo of a live T. fasciata.

Distinguishing features: A pale orange pronotal collar; brown wings with one white stripe on each fore wing; an orange abdomen with one black spot; the the anal lobe of the hind wing appears lighter in color than the rest of the hind wing.

Habitat: Southeast Asia.

Tosena mearesiana

No photos.

Distinguishing features: See A Monograph of Oriental Cicadidae by W. L. Distant

Habitat: India.

Tosena melanoptera

Photos of a live T. melanoptera.

Distinguishing features: Red eyes; white pronotal collar; pale brown stripe on dark brown fore wings.

Habitat: India & Southeast Asia.

Tosena monitvaga

No photos.

Distinguishing features: See A Monograph of Oriental Cicadidae by W. L. Distant

Habitat: India.

Sources to learn more about Tosena cicadas:

  • The Book Cicadas of Thailand: General and Particular Characteristics. Volume 1 by Michel Boulard. This book mentions Tosena, in particular, many times, and in general it does an excellent job of discussing the anatomy, behavior and habitat of cicadas found in Thailand.
  • A Monograph of Oriental Cicadidae by W. L. Distant. (1889, Published by the Order of the Trustees of the Indian Museum of Calcutta).
  • Rhynchota: Heteroptera-Homopetera ( Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma ) by W. L. Distant (1906)
  • The Cicadas of India Facebook page

July 5, 2008

A monograph of oriental cicadidae (1892) by Willian Lucas

Filed under: Anatomy | Oriental Cicadidae | Photos & Illustrations — Dan @ 3:13 am

I recently found a book called A monograph of oriental cicadidae in the Internet Archive. The A monograph of oriental cicadidae was authored by W. L. Distant, and published in 1892 — that’s 116 years ago! The book contains plenty of text and illustrations, some of which I’ll include below:

Angamiana etherea

Angamiana etherea

Cicada taglica

Cicada taglica

Cosmopsaltria tripurasura

Cosmopsaltria tripurasura

Peciliopsaltria hampsoni

Peciliopsaltria hampsoni

Terpnosia stipata

Terpnosia stipata

Tosena depicta

Tosena depicta

Tosena sibylla

Tosena sibylla

Tosena splendida

Tosena splendida

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