Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

Cicadas have three types of life cycles: annual, periodical, proto-periodical.

December 5, 2006

An Interview with Gene Kritsky

Filed under: Books | Gene Kritsky | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 4:26 am

Gene’s new book for 2024: A Tale of Two Broods: The 2024 Emergence of Periodical Cicada Broods XIII and XIX book by Dr. Gene Kritsky.

A Tale of Two Broods: The 2024 Emergence of Periodical Cicada Broods XIII and XIX

The 2006 Interview:

Gene Kritsky is one of the foremost and most accessible cicada researchers in North America. His excellent book In Ohio’s Backyard–Periodical Cicadas is a Cicada Mania favorite. Gene’s new book Periodical Cicadas: The Plague and the Puzzle is due out any day now. You should also visit Gene’s web site. Gene was kind enough to answer some of our questions — we hope you enjoy them:

Cicada Mania: There are a mind-boggling variety of insects in the world — why did you choose to focus your studies on cicadas?

Gene Kritsky: I am a student of history. I was first introduced to periodical cicadas by Frank N. Young at Indiana University. I immediately felt that there must be a wealth of information about periodical cicadas that had been overlooked through the years. It was mining that information, coupled with studying their biology that started it all for me.

CM: You have a new book titled Periodical Cicadas: The Plague and the Puzzle "emerging" in books stores soon. How does it differ from your previous cicada book In Ohio’s Backyard–Periodical Cicadas?

GK: The Plague and the Puzzle has a greater focus on history. It includes a long-lost manuscript written in 1716, the first stand-alone published work on periodical cicadas, a terminology timeline, and a review of what has happened in the past 104 years including, including new findings from my lab. In Ohio’s Backyard is a field guide for people wanting to experience the periodical cicadas. It contains activities for teachers and parents to help kids to better appreciate these insects.

CM: What makes Magicicada Brood X different from other emergences?

GK: Brood X is the largest of the 17-year broods. It has a long history going back to 1715. For me personally, I first studied Brood X in 1987 when it emerged in Cincinnati. It gave me the opportunity to set up some experiments that will finally come to completion. It is, therefore, like an old friend coming back to visit.

CM: Will all three 17-year Magicicada species (septendecim, cassini, &
septendecula) emerge this year?

GK: Yes, we are expecting all three species this year.

CM: Have you ever observed animosity between cicadas of different species? What cicada qualities make a male Magicicada more likely to find a mate? Does the guy with the loudest call, have the best chance of passing on his genes?

GK: I have not noticed animosity between the species, but have seen males of the same species compete for females by overlapping their calls. But we must be careful not to give the periodical cicadas human emotions. I think they are simply responding to a genetic cue, and doing what they do best. That being singing, matings, laying eggs, and dying.

CM: Do you think the mayor of Cincinnati should consider replacing the Flying Pig monuments with Cicada monuments?

GK: It is interesting that we have the same mayor this year as we did in 1987. This time, however, the city is getting into the emergence with a greater sense of fun. We are going to have a CD of cicada songs, cicada-free zones, cicada parties, cicada exhibits, t-shirts, jewelry, etc.

CM: Cincinnati is known for its chili restaurants. Know any good cicada chili recipes?

GK: I have not had them in chili, but they should be a nice addition. I personally like them battered and fried with a nice hot mustard sauce.

Periodical Cicadas: the Plague and the Puzzle:

Periodical Cicadas: the Plague and the Puzzle

There is usually a copy or two on Amazon.com.

In Ohio’s Backyard: Periodical Cicadas:

In Ohio's Backyard: Periodical Cicadas

Cicada Wedding Planner

Filed under: Magicicada | Periodical | Video — Dan @ 4:09 am

Bride

The most frequently asked question we get is "will cicadas spoil my outdoor wedding"? I guess Al Roker gets the " will it rain on my wedding day" questions? Seriously, most people consider their wedding day the most important day of their life — no wonder they want it to be perfect. I’m no Jennifer
Lopez, but I’ll try to help you plan around these potential wedding crashers.

The Date

Magicicada typically emerge sometime in early May and have expired by the last week of June. When they emerge depends on where you live. Typically, cicadas in northern states emerge later than those in southern states, but you can pretty much count on them being around in May and June. Try the cicada emergence formula to try to estimate when they will emerge in your area.

You can use the chart on our Frequently Asked Questions page to see if Magicicadas are emerging in your state in the year of your wedding.

The Location

There are two things you need to consider: 1) your state and city, and 2) the actual location where the wedding will be held.

Your state and city:

First check the cicada maps!

  • Step 1: Find an actual map of your state and town – you can use Mapquest.
  • Step 2: Find a corresponding cicada brood map. A brood map will tell you where the cicadas will appear in a given year. We have most of the brood maps here.
  • Step 3) compare the brood map with the real map. If the areas match, cicadas may be an issue.

The actual location where the wedding will be held:

The good news is Magicicadas don’t emerge in every yard and every neighborhood. You have to do some research:

  1. Ask the property owners what the last emergence was like. If they weren’t around, knock on a few doors, or go to the library and check the town newspaper. Obviously, if the last emergence was heavy, cicadas may be an issue.
  2. Does the property have no trees, some trees, or is it like a forest? Cicadas love trees, especially deciduous trees (like oaks, maples) and fruit trees. If there are plenty of trees in the yard or the surrounding yards, cicadas may be an issue.

Do’s

  1. Consider renting a hall. Sure, grandma’s yard is pretty,
    but nothing beats peace of mind — and it might rain anyway.
  2. If you’re set on having an outdoor wedding rent a big tent. Definitely, have a tent for the ceremony and guests. Remember, it has to fit the band as well. You might also consider renting a second tent for the food area.
  3. Music. Cicadas are loud, and you will hear them, but good PA systems (like those DJs use), and bands are louder. A small stereo might not be loud enough.
  4. The food. Don’t bring it out until it’s time to eat, and keep it covered. Your caterer should have some ideas as well — like serve the food inside the house, or under a tent. Cicadas have no interest in human food, but one might fall out of a tree and into the potato salad.
  5. Educate your guests: Let them know that cicadas don’t sting like bees. Let them know they’ll be around for the length of the party.
  6. Clean up: Cicadas leave skins behind — you may have to clean up before the wedding. A shop vac works fine.
  7. Make a game of it. Kids love bugs: have some containers around for the kids to collect the cicadas in. It’s something they’ll never forget.
  8. Bring your sense of humor, and relax. Like rain, there’s not much you can do about it. If the property is full of cicadas, get set for some hilarious pictures.
  9. Bagpipes are effective at drowning out cicadas.

The Don’ts

  1. Don’t Use pesticide. You’ll only stink up the yard, and make the guests sick. Plus, cicadas are flyers — the cicadas from the neighbor’s yard will fly right into yours.
  2. Don’t Panic. They’re only bugs, and while they look fearsome and have hard body parts, they don’t bite and sting like bees and flies do.

What you can expect

  1. The bodies of dead cicadas littering the ground.
  2. The constant hum of cicada song.
  3. An occasional cicada landing on a guest. Guests screaming.
  4. An occasional cicada crawling on a table, chair, barbecue.

I speak from personal experience. In 1996 friends of mine had an outdoor wedding in the midst of a cicada emergence. The yard was filled with tall oak trees (which cicadas love) — and plenty of cicadas as well. Cicada shells littered the ground near the base of trees. You could hear the cicadas hum the whole time, but they didn’t drown out the music (a classic quartet, and a DJ later on). An occasional cicada landed on a guest, and you could see a few crawling on lawn chairs, but everyone seemed to take it in stride and the kids loved them. The cicadas only made the event even more memorable.

On the other hand, my sister thinks the cicadas “pretty much destroyed the wedding”, so maybe you should rent a hall after all.

Lastly, here’s some scenes from a cicada infested wedding I attended in 1996:

Scenes from a Cicada Wedding – Brood II 1996 from Cicada Mania on Vimeo.

Good Luck!

— Dan

August 27, 2006

Archive of Magicicada Discussions 2005-2006

Filed under: Magicicada | Mail, Comments & Social | Periodical — Dan @ 1:29 pm

Comment by Brandi — August 27, 2006 [AT] 7:02 pm

I am from Sharon, Pennsylvania. My cat has brought 2 Magicicadas in my house . We have been hearing them sing the last few days . They were big and black with clear wings .

Comment by Sherry Vanditta — August 14, 2006 [AT] 3:31 pm

I live in Sacramento, California. In the past two weeks my cat has been bringing in cicadas. There have been about 10 of them so far. I’ve had three “delivered” in the last two days. I’ve done a little research on the web and this doesn’t appear to be the norm. I don’t see any outside, but pretty sure I hear them up in my huge tree. None of my neighbors hve this problem either.

Isn’t this unusual? They look like they are Magicicada cassini or Magicicada septendecula. Any enlightenment will be appreciated.

Comment by Bea Maurer — July 24, 2006 [AT] 10:22 pm

Our location is 38.2 N, 86.2 degrees W. This is a little neighborhood off of Blanton Lane and Dixie Hwy in Louisville, KY. This morning I was cleaning my pool and I heard a splash in it. This poor creature had landed in it. Not sure what it was, I got it out and came in to check on the web. From what I found on cicadamania.com,it must be a straggler. My cam is not working so no picture can be taken. I will try to get a pic before I let it go if anyone is interested. I hear them occasionally at night, but first time I’ve actually seen one since I was a child. My grandson has found shells over the past 2 yrs, but we never found one till now. Just thought I’d let ya know for those who are interested.

Comment by Donna Denson — July 8, 2006 [AT] 7:32 am

June 17, 2006
Our dog found a Okanagana rimosa cicada in our backyard. This was in Edmonton Alberta Canada off the revine in the Capilano area. Very cool never seen anything like it. A black star with an orange circle just behind its head on a plate of some sort. It has since been taken to the University 0f Alberta; Strickland Entomological Museum.

Comment by M. Valgardson — June 22, 2006 [AT] 10:57 am

Some very late notes on brood xxiii in central Mississippi, May, 2002.
In the Jackson, MS area tridecassini was probably the most numerous species, with tridecim next, and tridecula a very distant third. M. tridecassini is the one that makes a ticking sound followed by a buzz like a weedeater revving up. There were so many that the sound was really deafening, and the intensity would rise and fall, like waves crashing on a beach. I think that each species aggregated with its own kind, but I have no proof. The much quieter tridecim—the one with the “pharaoh” song was in smaller groups. I noticed that very early in the morning, before the sun came up, the tridecims were singing, but none of the others. I also noticed that when I was going home on my bicycle after dark, my bicycle light elicited buzzes and partial songs from a few of the cicadas as I went by. The rather scarce tridecula were in small groups, and they tended to be where the trees were not tall—basically in fields where the trees were just moving in.
In 2003, 2004, and 2005, each May, I heard a few tridecassini stragglers singing. Before the big spring 2002 brood, I heard one tridecassini that jumped the gun in October, 2001!

Comment by Paul Krombholz — September 20, 2005 [AT] 9:34 pm

August 23, 2005

Went out on my deck this morning to enjoy a cup of coffee. When I went to sit down I had a visitor resting on my chair. It’s the first Cicada I’ve seen up close since the 80s. I’ve heard them humming in the trees all summer. They’re loud and they’re here in Rocky Hill, CT.

Comment by Marilyn — August 23, 2005 [AT] 6:30 am

I am in Rockville, MD and we had a HUGE emergence last year — HUGE. I didn’t realize that there would be any this year but I have been hearing the buzzing sound for a little over a week and wasn’t sure what it was. Well, when 2 were swarming around me last evening, I then realized it. I found 3 dead ones on the ground today while gardening and as I type this, every once in awhile, there is a “knock” on the window from one when they run into the glass. Nothing like last year but there are definately some in this area!

Comment by Susan — August 22, 2005 [AT] 10:38 pm

A friend of mine also has them in Mansura, La.
I had taken pics, but I think I deleted them, will try again

Comment by iluvmykhalil — August 15, 2005 [AT] 4:13 pm

8/15/05—-There are alot in Princeton, Illinois.
I have seen one on my porch about every other day. There dead skin or what ever you call it, well let’s just say in my front yard I found at least 20 of them, it feels like we are infested with them, ok maybe I am over exaggerating. I don’t like them, they are big, ugly and scare me!

Comment by iluvmykhalil — August 15, 2005 [AT] 4:10 pm

I saw 2 Magicicadas in Camden, NJ in 2 days. On August 12th, I saw a dead one laying on the walkway in front of Cooper Hospital. Then on August 14th I saw one on the screen of my front door in Cramer Hill, NJ. When I opened the door it tried to fly away but banged into the post and into the grass. Very big insect!! I have alot of trees in my yard and live close to a wooded area so if I see one on one of my trees, I will try to take a picture. It’s hard though since I am afraid of insects. Also,on my way to Wildwood, NJ I heard them singing the entire way through the Atlantic City Expressway on August 13th as well.

Comment by M Casiano — August 14, 2005 [AT] 9:15 am

The Cicadas are here un the Upstate of South Carolina. I live in a little town southwest of Greenville SC called Honea Path. We have Oak and Chesnut Trees and the are singing wonderfully all day like I used to hear them in Southern France.
Now here I need an expert for answers? I heard the same noise last year. Not quite as prominent then this year but still I could hear them well every day.
This year I have been looking around and found some dead Magicicadas.
I am a little lost about this 17 year cicle. How could I have heard some last year and this year.
Are they other types of cicadas that live every year and make a similar noise?
Also as I go about enjoying these wonderful creatures of nature I hear being closer some high pitch singing less loud and frequent?
I would be thankful if anybody can give me more information. Suggestions of site with information and an excellent book about cicadas.
I feel in heaven, romantic and this wonderful noise while reading a book under a tree is an awesome feeling.
Edmond Schafeitel
Honea Path SC

Comment by Edmond Schafeitel — August 14, 2005 [AT] 8:38 am

The Cicadas are here in Charlotte, NC in droves. I am on the southwest side of Charlote, near the SC border. The oak trees are ringing loudly. Now the starlings are showing up in flocks for the buffet. I have never been glad to see starlings until now. I didn’t see any Cicadas in my neighborhood last year, and if they were here, there weren’t very many of them. This is the third time I have witnessed them during my lifetime.

Comment by Dr.Volts — August 14, 2005 [AT] 6:16 am

I saw one two days ago, and I squished them in between my toes, ohh how I love the feeling. Anyone know when more are comming in, I did this two times so far, there blue eyes, turn red when you moosh them!

[Moderator: don’t moosh cicadas.]

Comment by Ceerie — August 13, 2005 [AT] 8:09 pm

Seattle WA, Aug 8, 2005, 2 pm 80 degrees.
I had to have my wife tell me what the hell that noise was. I have never seen or heard anything like this before, though i only moved to Seattle in 1988.
I grew up in eastern Montana, and have never heard them.

Wierd!!!

Comment by lloyd — August 7, 2005 [AT] 8:35 am

Cicadas are buzzing heavily in Narberth, Pa. Actually spotted a live one on a chair in my yard. Found several shells in a tree and on the ground. Thought they only emerged every 17 yrs? Although their sound is soothing to myself, my young child is terrified of their noise. How long should we expect them to be around? Thanks!!

Comment by Heather G. — August 6, 2005 [AT] 4:22 pm

I know nothing about cicadas but they are in my yard. I live in Waukesha WI and they have been here for a couple of weeks, yet a friend who lives 1/4 mile away does not hear them in his yard. We only hear them at night as soon as the sun goes down they start singing and are quite loud. Tonight they are not as loud and it doesn’t sound as if there are as many as there have been in the last few weeks. Are these what you call stragglers? I found 1 shell in our driveway but did not realize what it was until I started ready about them on you website

Comment by gundi davis — August 5, 2005 [AT] 7:40 pm

Location: Boone, NC, right on the TN/NC/VA border. Last year I eagerly awaited Brood X, but was terribly dissapointed. I might have heard 2 at my home, at the most. While rafting on the Nolichucky River in TN (2004), they were deafening! This year, my home is surrounded by them. We have been having some unusually hot weather breaking a long standing record by hitting 90deg last week, maybe that’s why they are so active. I have been stalking the woods with my camera trying to get a pic, but they are everywhere except for where I am! Camera shy little suckers….

Comment by Shannon K — August 1, 2005 [AT] 9:36 am

I live in Freeport, NY (Long Island) I have about 10 shells in front of my home with a new one on my front door everyday. I also see the holes in the dirt. Don’t expect me to take pictures I am deathly affraid of insects of all kind. The noise is annoying..

Comment by Tiarra T. — July 28, 2005 [AT] 10:38 am

I’ve been hearing the very distinctive sound for several weeks now in nothern Virginia. Thought sure it was cicadas. I believe we have them in large numbers. Last night, the cat brought one in the house. We were able to get it out, but there is no mistaking that it was a cicada.

Comment by Dawn W — July 23, 2005 [AT] 7:28 am

A brood has emerged in Central Texas, the top of the bug looks like the face of a grasshopper, smiling. I guessed it was a cicada, heard about it, never saw it. Recently we have been seeing bizarre looking bug shells around the home, now I know what it was. Our kid spotted it clinging from it’s recently hatched shell on our screen. They sure are not scared, didn’t fly away and moved pretty slowly when nudged. No wonder they are hard to see. Ours was a light green with transparent wings that were brown tiped, so it blends in WELL witht the tree. The nymph phase seems to be universal looking ashy brown/tan. We are in Copperas Cove, TX, north of Austin.

Comment by James G — July 22, 2005 [AT] 8:43 am

I LIVE IN ENOREE, SC, IT’S JULY 20TH. I WAS SITTING OUTSIDE AROUND 11:30 PM AND SAW WHAT I THOUGHT WAS A GREEN BUG ATTACKING ANOTHER BROWN BUG. LOOKED CLOSER AND WAS AMAZED!!! IT WAS A CICADA EMERGING!!! I SAT AND WATCHED FOR WHAT SEEMED AN ETERNITY. ABOUT 30 TO 40 MINUTES LATER A BEAUTIFUL, LONG WINGED CREATURE APPEARED. I’VE NEVER FELT CLOSER TO NATURE. I’M GOING TO CHECK AND SEE IF IT HAS FLOWN AWAY YET…NOPE…IT’S STILL JUST SITTING THERE ON IT’S OLD SHELL. I MUST GO TO SLEEP NOW.

Comment by Shay C — July 20, 2005 [AT] 9:06 pm

Yeah, yeah. I know I’m late with this.

I’m a PGRC member, and on a Saturday Morining run in late May (the 28th, I believe) I’m certain I heard a lone, Brood-X cicada somewhere in the middle of Greenbelt Park (Greenbelt, MD).

Comment by Tim Holtz — July 18, 2005 [AT] 7:05 pm

Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. Wow, we’ve never seen these before but in the last 24 hours we’ve found two of these guy’s (or gals) perched up on the brick wall directly outside the front door. The first one had a very long abdomin, even longer wings, and generally light brown all over.
Today’s find looks much more like the photos we have seen. It has a very large/wide green/brown head, green collar, green and mostly light brown wings, and brown body with a dark stripe going almost the entire lenth of the underside.
What a racket they make! Very interesting.

Comment by James Fyvie — July 14, 2005 [AT] 11:31 am

I live in Perth County (Ontario Canada) and have just heard quite a few in the tree outside my window. It is somewhat soothing to know that they are here again.

Comment by Cathy — July 12, 2005 [AT] 6:35 pm

I heard them a few days ago (just one or two), then silence due to rain and cooler weather here in Bayside, Queens. This mornining was warm and sunny and heard the same one or two once more. Pretty early for these parts I think. I usually do not hear them until mid august. I hope that does not mean they will be plentiful cause I hate them!!

Comment by Mindy — July 10, 2005 [AT] 1:06 pm

Today, while out walking my dogs, I heard the definite music of cicadas. I couldn’t tell you what kind they were as they all sound alike to me.

I’m in northwest Nassau county (Long Island). Has anyone else heard them around here?

Comment by Marilyn — July 9, 2005 [AT] 12:20 pm

It saddens me with the extinction of brood XI. I bet if you looked on old trees you my be able to see the scars from a cicada brood that no longer exists. Perhaps we could have done some sound mapping to see if there where any existing chorusing areas left. Who knows, maybe there is small pockets left.

Comment by Matt — June 29, 2005 [AT] 3:53 pm

I live in Jacksonville, Florida and we are cursed with Cicadas. In Jacksonville they don’t come out every 17 years, 7 years, or 3 years. They show up every year! Their “song” sounds like a high voltage power line. I am not aware of any studies but my guess is Cicadas are a major cause of depression and anxiety. I hate them.

Comment by Randy Ross — June 25, 2005 [AT] 7:01 am

Found a mature female Brood X straggler yesterday (15 June 2005) in Falls Church, VA. We had huge numbers last year, especially on the 50-yr-old maple tree in our yard, but I didn’t realize there would be 1-year stragglers. Haven’t heard any singing in the neighborhood so far.

C

omment by Pete Jennings — June 16, 2005 [AT] 1:57 pm

They are back this year (2005) in Forest Park Ohio! YUCK!! Thankfully not in the same numbers as last year. I estimate I’ve seen about 50 shells in the yard. Thank goodness I haven’t seen any of them flying around. I can hear them in the trees. Last year, I would barely leave the house and when I did, I did it in the evening. Hopefully I will be in a cicada free town before they come out again.

Comment by Linda — June 15, 2005 [AT] 5:09 pm

The search for Brood XI is on. The “lost” brood was located in CT, MA and RI but hasn’t been seen in over 50 years. Unlike the massive Brood X which we all heard about last year, this was a small and vulnerable brood. John Cooley from UConn and I would like to enlist the help of anyone in these three states. Sorry Midwesterners, but any periodical cicadas you see are probably stragglers from Brood X. Especially if you had them in large amounts from the previous year. To fully understand our problem, you have to read the original location descriptions from 50 years ago. Basically, all that is written is a county reference such as “Hartford County.” Street locations, landmarks or any other points of reference just aren’t listed too often or may even have changed. It will be different for the next generation thanks to the GPS, but for now we have some legwork (and cyberwork) to do. Obviously, the best case scenario would be to have a live specimen. But lacking this, we ask if you could please ask your older relatives or friends if they remember anything detailed. Someone might have a journal page or photograph that could really help us hone in on a specific location. Even a memory, as long as it can provide times and locations, would be helpful. It’s already happened to us once, as a farmer was able to direct us to a previous location. (Sadly, there was a construction crew literally starting to build a house on it, but John and I think the cicadas were long gone.)
Counties that had records are Hartford in Connecticut. Bristol, Franklin, and Hampshire in Massachusetts. Providence (near Tiogue Reservoir) in Rhode Island. Brood XI’s expected cycle in the last century was 1988, 1971, 1954, 1937, 1920 and 1903. “No cicada” sightings or “negative records” are helpful from these areas as well. So if you are planning a hike in any of these locations in the next month and don’t see anything, shoot me an email. It may help us to cut down on places we need to search. Thanks for your help.

Mike Neckermann
castle10 [AT] charter.net

Comment by Mike Neckermann — June 10, 2005 [AT] 1:26 am

oh and i just wanted to say that i am in pierre part louisiana wwayyyyy down south about 30 min. southwest of new orleans it was a brite lime green color so fresh very very flimbzy!!!!!!!!!1

Comment by cody leonard — June 7, 2005 [AT] 9:40 pm

i w

i watched one crawl out of its shell tonite june 5 2005 at11.05 at nite
the wings were flopy and soft it climbed up my rocker i was sitting in so i put it on the brick wall and put an aqurium over it took some pics to

Comment by cody leonard — June 7, 2005 [AT] 9:35 pm

At Green Lane Park PA I went to the most popular Magicicada tree from last year. Saw maybe 20 or 30 shells on the ground. I wondered if they were left over from last year’s hatching but my daughter didn’t think shells would last a whole year. So we concluded that these must be Stragglers! I didn’t see any live cicadas though. However, a bit later I began hearing the call of one single Cassini among the trees!

Laura

Comment by Laura Woodswalker — June 5, 2005 [AT] 6:28 pm

I can hear 1 or 2 magicicada cassini singing in my back yard.

Comment by Matt — June 5, 2005 [AT] 7:52 am

Caught another magicicada on the same tree. Thats 3 on one tree. In Loveland Ohio.

Comment by Matt — June 4, 2005 [AT] 4:03 am

found 2 magicicada shells on a tree in Loveland, Ohio.

Comment by Matt — May 30, 2005 [AT] 7:14 pm

Stragglers in Pohatcong Twsp. (Warren County, NJ)! Heard them (decim) today and I was so excited although I would flip if we could actually see them here. Last year I heard a few but only saw large populations a bit South of here in Holland Twsp. Think I will ride down there tomorrow and see if I find any of our little friends buzzing around.

Comment by LPK — May 29, 2005 [AT] 7:21 pm

Great: take a photo and send email it to the site — if you can get a picture of a cicada next to a newspaper (for dating purposes) that would be awesome.

Comment by Administrator — May 29, 2005 [AT] 10:03 am

Hey, I know this sounds unusual but i found 11 magicicada shells on a tree in my grandmas yard in terrace park ohio

Comment by Mat — May 28, 2005 [AT] 11:11 am

Awesome. I’ll let you know (and everyone else) if I hear about anything in Princeton.

Comment by Administrator — May 11, 2005 [AT] 7:32 am

I have a friend in Silver Springs MD which had a fantastic emergence last year. He will be checking for any stragglers this week as warm weather is expected shortly. I may go to Princeton NJ in a couple of weeks myself.

Comment by AJay — May 8, 2005 [AT] 10:18 am

re: why they sing in summer

Date: Wednesday, Apr/27/2005

> If so, does >it mean that they mate only in >Summer? So what do they do in >Winter? — Som, Thailand Som, let’s just say they spend a lot of time “getting in shape” for mating season. — bissel spilkes, town, state

Largest Cicada?

Date: Tuesday, Apr/26/2005

Wow! This message board has been dead for awhile! I would like to know what the largest type cicada in America is. Here in Virginia, We have several species, some of which I don’t know the names of. First ones I hear each summer are the standard T. Pruinosa, always in old-tree neighborhoods. Next to be heard are my favorites, T Lyricen. Near the beginning of the season they are heard near dusk, but as the summer progresses, they’re heard all day. They have the sweetest, mellowist song: It starts like any other tibicen song, a rising buzz, then suddenly it changes to a soft whirring, like a rotating electric motor. A single specimen’s drums often go slightly ‘out-of-sync’, and you hear a harmonic beating in the whirring sound. Next to appear is the ‘morning cicada’, T. Chloromera <-spelled wrong! These are strange looking: VERY flat, wide heads, the most 'classic-looking' Tibicen type, powdered entiry bright white underneath, and with long, bend-down opercula. We also have the 'watch-winder', which looks outwardly like T pruinosa, but has uprasied ridges on the abdomen that meet and seal with the opercula, the chamber. Their song sounds like someone winding a clock. Later in the summer, appears (never very common) T Auletes, which I thought was the biggest. Their song has a hollow, sound, like a chorus of frogs, a long steady whistling drone, with a regular beating 'tocking' sound. These appear around here in old-tree areas, and often sing well after the sun has gone down. Latest cicada in the season, is a very small one, definately a Tibicen, has a very shrill scream that lasts for only 5 or 6 seconds. I've seen these in the Blue Ridge Mountains, where they're more common, but they also appear here in the DC area. Other unknown one that I've caught, have a song like a cross between T. Pruinosa, and T. Lyricens, and these are a bit smaller, similar color like Pruinosa, but have a black stripe down the powdered white underside of the abdomen, and black opercula. What American Cicada is the largest though? Fred -- Fred Berry, Virginia

why they sing in summer

Date: Tuesday, Apr/19/2005

Hi there. I’m fron Thailand and I wonder is it true that cicadas love to “sing” in Summer? If so, does it mean that they mate only in Summer? So what do they do in Winter? — Som, Thailand

Web de entomologia

Date: Tuesday, Mar/15/2005

web de entomologia ——entomology web in spanish http://jlmcsonora.tripod.com — Juan, Ciudad Obregon, Sonora, M�xico

More Japanese Cicadas!

Date: Wednesday, Feb/23/2005

These are my favorites! I spent many years studying and collecting them. From tiny ones less than an inch long, to those that are among the largest (and loudest) in the world (listen to a Kuma Semi, their unearthly song travels for miles and stands right out from among the millions of other cicadas singing all around you. In full swing its call sounds like an ominous, inhuman voice, very clearly saying the word ‘HISS’ quickly, over and over again! To this day, no other cicada song impresses me as much! This type and its close and equally huge/loud relative the Yama Semi have tremendous drumheads and exotically shaped opercula. From above they look like giant versions of our dogday cicadas, with very wide heads, but their bodies are polished shiney black with powdered white line behind the drumheads, and covered with sparse golden hairs/dust that easily rubs off. In flight, they are very fast and agile, looking all the world like small birds! Love my semi!! — Fred, Virginia

Howdy

Date: Wednesday, Feb/16/2005

Howdy Dan and all the rest of the cicada watchers! 8>- x — cicada x, In

Leonardo Milhomem – Brasilia, Brazil Cicada Photos

Date: Monday, Feb/14/2005

Quesada Gigas can also be found in the United States. It sings at dusk and has a very interesting sound I would descibe as a tea kettle or a long high pitched whine. The location and time I have personally heard them is mid July at the San Antonio Texas KOA. — Mike, Columbia CT

June 17, 2006

Magicicada Straggler Watch 2006

Filed under: Magicicada | Periodical Stragglers — Dan @ 2:55 pm

In a few weeks you might see some Magicicada stragglers in areas that saw the Brood X emergence back in 2004. If you see any, let us know.

Update: some exciting news in the comments (before I accidentally deleted the original article):

Our 2006 straggler hunt has been very successful— much more successful than our 2005 Brood XI hunt.

Our group found M. septendecim (XIII), M. tredecassini (XIX), M. tredecim, M. neotredecim, M. tredecassini, and M. tredecula (XXIII), and unidentified nymphal skins, as well as a possible M. cassini (X) straggler— all on a 3-day Midwestern trip. Although most sightings consisted of isolated or small numbers of individuals, two emergences— one at Moody Cemetary in Greene-Sullivan State Forest, Indiana (mostly M. neotredecim), and one at the Vectren Energy plant entrance, near Yankeetown (east of Evansville) IN (mostly M. tredecassini) were substantial enough that there were periods of continuous calling. Not bad for an “off” year!

Complete records will be incorporated into the Magicicada database on Cicada Central as soon as some server issues are solved. If you have records that you’d like to put in the database, send the details (species present, approximate numbers of individuals), the complete locality info (including lat. and lon. if you have it), the date, and your complete name to me at the University of Connecticut (email is just firstname.lastname@uconn.edu).

John Cooley

Cicada Central.

June 2, 2006

Okanagana from Carlsbad, CA

Filed under: Okanagana | Proto-periodical — Dan @ 9:08 am

Okanagana.

This photo was taken on May 28th, in Carlsbad, CA by Rebecca. Thanks Rebecca!

Originally I had this labeled as O. rimosa, but it is not.

December 31, 2005

2005 Archive of Annual Cicada Signtings

Filed under: Annual | Mail, Comments & Social — Dan @ 1:01 am

Cicadas are emerging “down under” in Australia. Small species have been appearing for around a month, but the first emergence of the large “Green grocers” (Cyclochila australasiae) occurred around Sydney on October 14.

Comment by David Emery — October 23, 2005 [AT] 5:02 am

To Wes Phillips (Aug 21). Have been trying to contact you from Australia on your old email address(2003) about cicadas, but messages bounce back. Have you changed it, please?

Comment by david — August 30, 2005 [AT] 3:25 pm

Well make that two Tibicens now in Franconia, Virginia. Found one in my cellar well. Can’t wait until the next “17 year” cicada brood appears in our area.

Comment by Scott Dwinelle — August 29, 2005 [AT] 6:27 pm

I live in Los Angeles California. I am not sure what I saw but it looked like the cicada insect. I saw two yesterday. They caught my eye because I have never seen any insect like this in LA. It looked very similar to the cicada pictures posted in this web site; the differences are these were forest green and the body was slightly thinner. Has anyone reported seeing any in California? Next one I see I will take a picture. I do know we have had record rain fall for this year and there are a lot more spiders because of it.

Comment by Rick Rivera — August 27, 2005 [AT] 9:27 am

Saw my first Tibicen of the season the other day here in Franconia, Virginia. We really don’t see these to often. Usually one or two a year. Now Magicicada we get by the thousands!

Comment by Scott Dwinelle — August 23, 2005 [AT] 2:20 pm

i’ve a photo of a huge cicada…..cant’ find any other to compair to….ugh………can u help?

Comment by Carla — August 23, 2005 [AT] 8:32 am

I have never seen as many Cicada’s as we have had this year. Last year the buzz (pardon the pun!) was all about the Brood X, This year by far has been ALOT Worse. I am finding 10-20 shells of the molted Cicada’s every couple weeks. I have had at least 3 “Waves” of Molted and now singing Cicada’s. The Holes are starting to become Very apparent of yet another hatching and evolving. A couple weeks ago the noise was almost maddening. Just unbelieveable.

Comment by Pati — August 23, 2005 [AT] 7:42 am

This has been a great summer for cicadas in the Texas Panhandle area. My granddaughter Ashley and I made a trip down near Lubbock and found some of the smallest cicadas in this country. We found not only Pacarina puella, but also Beameria venosa. Beameria venosa is the smaller of these and to my surprise was a two-tone green color. We also collected numerous Cicadetta kansa near Fritch. Tibicen superba appears to still be the most common large cicada and we caught several of them this summer as well. Interestingly enough, I also caught some Microstylum morosum — the Giant Robber Fly which is a predator on cicadas. This is the largest fly in the united states, and some of the specimens we caught were an inch and a half long.

Wes Phillips

Comment by Wes Phillips — August 21, 2005 [AT] 4:31 pm

I thought is was some nuclear being. We don’t have insects that big in Eugene, OR. Let alone plated ones with huge tubular needles coming from their mouth. I could hear it from the back of our property. I placed it in a jar until someone suggested it may be a cicada. My children set it on the patio table and watched it for over an hour. We were able to see it “sing” but you couldn’t really tell the abdomen was even moving. What a pleasure

Comment by Kristin — August 17, 2005 [AT] 4:39 pm

I hear them continuously throughout the daylight hours here in the far northwest of Illinois. I’m about 45 minutes from the Wisconsin border. I was just wondering if anyone knew when they will quiet down and their “song” will end. It has driven me almost to the point of insanity!

Comment by Sara — August 17, 2005 [AT] 10:48 am

Hi, I just saw this website, because I was trying to do some research on Cicada holes. We recently moved to Shamong, NJ (dec of 2004), and
about a month ago, I noticed HUNDREDS of little holes in our yard. I mean literally TONS of them. I didn’t know what they were. We live in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey, and I had seen lots of shells of cicadas this Spring, 2005. Then about 3 weeks ago, we saw a cicada crawling across our sidewalk to the driveway. We live in DENSE FOREST area. My front yard is a forest, and so is my backyard. I had listened to some Cicada sounds, on the internet, and then realized “THIS IS THE SOUND that I have been hearing for the past few weeks.
All I can tell you is that we have HUNDREDS of HOLES — fresh holes, that I didn’t see earlier in early Spring. I am now seeing brittle Cicada shells all over the place and especially in our front yard.

So, I assume that they have made MY HOME, their home — which is cool. My hubby took pics of the one that was crawling across the sidewalk. It was late at night, however. Is that when they come out???

Email me, if you wish, and I will send you pics of the holes, and of the Cicada we saw, AND some other pics of the shells that are all over the place.

Jolly Alaniz

Comment by Joleen Alaniz — August 16, 2005 [AT] 6:06 am

Caught a live Tibician in southeast Indiana (Aurora) this morning on our front porch

Comment by Eric — August 14, 2005 [AT] 7:45 am

August 13,2004
Southeastern Mass I found a Tibicen variety of Cicada. It was located on the side of my garage near large catalpa tree The first time I have seen a live cicada and I have lived in area for my entire life. Found while looking for food for pet Praying Mantis. I do believe she will like this special treat.

Comment by Chris — August 13, 2005 [AT] 8:33 pm

my 12 yr. old daughter found a cicada outside in our front yard at 10:oo tonight the 13th of aug., 2005 in grandbay, alabama. we looked at it for a while trying to figure out what it was, and i remembered my dad telling me it was a cicada when i was about 12 yrs. old myself. we released it.

Comment by joey heflin — August 13, 2005 [AT] 8:03 pm

Here in Detroit, we hear them every summer. It’s just not summer without them. I’ve found several moltings on the trees near my home, the garage, and even on the side of my home. My daughter actually scared the crap (to put it polite) out of me when she brought a empty shell in the house. The sparrows & wrens in the area, must love them. I’ve seen some amazing chases this year. A few chases were near fatal for the birds. Since the birds where concentating on the cicadas and not watching traffic they were flying into. Watching a bird chase a cicada is AMAZING.

I have to admit these are some ugly bugs, but I love their music.

Comment by kelly — August 7, 2005 [AT] 7:01 pm

When we were younger, about 10 or so, my brother and would get up early in the morning, ride our bikes around the Neighborhood looking for cicadas. That seems to be the best time to catch them drying their wings on the trees. We had many pets that summer!

Comment by amanda — August 5, 2005 [AT] 11:05 am

I hear them every summer in the trees here in southern wisconsin!

Comment by amanda — August 5, 2005 [AT] 11:01 am

The mystery in San Antonio has been solved. Edward G. Riley, Associate Curator in the Department of Entomology at Texas A&M, identified the species we collected as Quesada giga. He believes this species to be the largest cicada in North America and it ranges from south Texas to South America. Their call is described as “metallic”. I can say first hand that that description is accurate, and they are certainly the largest cicada I’ve ever seen. Very interesting indeed.

Comment by Greg — August 2, 2005 [AT] 11:49 am

I caught my first cicada pet ever this summer of 2005. I found him in our pool and he was still alive. I put him in a container for 2 days and I named him Bob. About 1 week later I caught a girl cicada being attacked by a pray mantis. I nammed her betty.

Comment by Katy Czarnecki — August 2, 2005 [AT] 7:59 am

I caught a tibican in Aberdeen MD. I found a dead one infront of my apartment the other day. we have a ton of the model T cicadas in my edgewood MD apartment complex. last year there were none but the magicicadas were close by it sounded like an alien spaceship. though I ve never heard an alien spacecraft before LOL

Comment by Vince Matson — August 1, 2005 [AT] 6:25 pm

I’m 45-years-old and although long aware of cicadas I’ve never experienced them first-hand. Today, July 31, 2005 that all changed. Here now the details: At approximately 10:45 AM EDT in Woodcliff Lake, NJ my wife and I were parked in the Mack-Cali building parking lot. The sunroof to my car was open and I heard a very unusual and loud sound that appeared to be coming from a tree that we were parked under. Getting out of the car to further investigate I was first struck by how loud the sound was. At first I imagined it was some strange avian call and as I tried to spot this creature hidden in the dense foliage the sound would cycle in and out. Loud, then very loud, almost frantic, then moderating. This area of the parking lot was populated by a species of tree I’m not familiar with, but it had fruit very much like large green cherries. Further exploring the trees I finally spotted a cicada that I managed to close within about 3′ of before it found me too close for comfort and flew away. Candidly, these are not attractive insects *cough*, but the decibel level a solitary insect is able to reach is truly astounding. The buzz of this entire brood of insects was like nothing I’ve ever heard before although if you’ve ever attended an F1 automobile race, the sensation is not terribly dissimilar. Wow! Thanks for this site and for wading through this report.

Comment by John Smyth — July 31, 2005 [AT] 6:46 pm

For the first time in my life I was able to watch and photograph numerous cicada nmphs coming out of their exoskeletons and gradually gaining four, straight, green wings. They were on tree trunks and the long thorns of honey locust trees in my front yard in rural northwest Oklahoma. Dan from Cicadamania identified their species as “Tibicin” annual cicadas.

Comment by Mary — July 28, 2005 [AT] 10:02 am

My 8 year old son found a cicada this afternoon! After visiting your site and listening to a few of the songs, we think it is a Tibicen

Comment by Sarah — July 27, 2005 [AT] 6:12 pm

There’s been an emergence of an interesting species here in San Antonio, TX. It appears to be a Tibicen species of which several are common to this area. What sets this one apart is its shrill call. It’s a high pitched buzz or whine unlike the Tibicen chatter we’re used to in this area. I collected a few specimens with an entomologist this morning to determine the species and will follow up with a post when we key it out. If anyone else may be able to shed some light on this particularly shrill calling cicada please post up or contact me at ghammer [AT] tamu.edu.

Comment by Greg — July 26, 2005 [AT] 12:09 pm

I keep hearing Cicada’s in my area, not sure what kind it is, although I do know it’s of a tibicen type (yeah I’m not all that scientific) They are the most interesting insects I have come across…trying to learn more and I am ALWAYS looking to see them yet I can’t. We have many oaks and maple tree’s in our area and the buzzing sounds like there’s millions of them, yet I know that’s not the case. I love these bugs 🙂

Comment by Donna G — July 20, 2005 [AT] 2:13 pm

Concord,North Carolina — this morning found a dogday cicada. it was scary and amazing at the same time because i have never saw anything like this in my life before.
it died as it was coming out of its skeleton. it was the weirdest thing i ever saw.

Comment by lana B — July 12, 2005 [AT] 11:42 am

Central Illinois — not sure what species, didn’t even know what it was…after reviewing the web site, and waking my neighbor to see it, confirmed cicada wandering on the curb.

Comment by momma w — July 11, 2005 [AT] 6:37 am

Found 7 molting T. lyricen specimens in one of my favorite cicada walking spots on July 7th. As of today July 10th still not a peep out of them. I’m in Massachusetts.

Comment by Gerry — July 10, 2005 [AT] 4:16 pm

I heard about 1 or 2 Tibicen chloromera singing this morning around my house.

Comment by Matt — July 8, 2005 [AT] 6:51 am

Found my first live specimens of Tibicen lyricen here in Massachusetts on the 4th of July. They are not calling in the trees yet as of today (July 6th) but I did hear the call of a Tibicen canicularis in my yard on the 5th but I haven’t found any live specimens.

Gerry

Comment by Gerry — July 6, 2005 [AT] 9:37 pm

Found 3 shells and heard over 10 cicadas singing yesterday. I also saw one fly past us.

Comment by Matt — July 5, 2005 [AT] 2:50 pm

heard another!

Comment by Matt — July 2, 2005 [AT] 5:22 pm

I heard a tibicen linnei in Cincinnati this evening.

Comment by Matt — July 1, 2005 [AT] 8:49 pm

I finally heard my first tibicen last friday evening(June 26th) in southwest ohio. It was a T. linnei. I haven’t found any live nymphs or skins yet but am still looking. More updates to come.

Comment by Roy Troutman — June 26, 2005 [AT] 3:04 pm

Platypedia putmani, one of the western clicking cicada has emerged in good numbers in the foothills immediately west of Fort Collins, Colorado. More than usual are being heard on the west side of town. There is some debate, whether they are reproducing in town or migrating from pine and brushlands west of town. I’m begining to believe they have started reproducing within town.

Comment by Tim McNary — June 24, 2005 [AT] 7:57 am

Subject: 2005 cicada

While vacationing at disney guess what I heard. My first cicada of 2005.
(Hiero)
I heard them on 5/7/05 11:00 am. at Magic Kingdom also on 5/8 at Animal Kingdom, and 5/9 at Epcot. I did not hear any at MGM on 5/9. All days were mostly sunny with temps in the upper 80′s.

I am going to a meeting at Baltimore on may 18th. After the meeting im going to the same place I went last year in Annapolis were there was at least a couple 1000 Periodical Cicadas their in hopes of seeing and takeing home some stragglers. Bill

Comment by Bill Mister — June 2, 2005 [AT] 9:24 am

2005 Archive of General Cicada Questions

Filed under: Annual | Mail, Comments & Social — Dan @ 1:01 am

These questions come from the old General Cicada Questions message board. The questions and answers are in reverse order. URLs found in comments are old and likely do not work.

You can tell by looking at their abdomens. The females abdomen ends with a sharp point, like a sharpened pencil. The male is more stubby, like the top of a house.

Comment by Dan Mozgai — November 14, 2005 [AT] 6:08 am

How do you tell if cicada’s are male or female?

Comment by annika — November 13, 2005 [AT] 10:22 pm

To Julianna,
Messages 48-50. Cicadas suck sap from trees and grasses during development underground and after emergence. They, in turn are “eaten” by higher predators , especially spiders, tree crickets and birds, as well as preyed upon by wasps (“cicada-killer” wasp)and cicada collecting humans, dogs and cats. The shell “exuviae” simply degenerates and gets recycled after emergence, becomes a spider’s temporary home, or gets collected and ground up for some traditional (especially Chinese) medicines.
Underground, cicada nymphs can be attacked by “entomophagic” (insect eating) fungus that kills the cicadas at some stage, but life above ground is pretty short and infection-free. Prolonged rain may promote bacterial disease.

Comment by david — October 9, 2005 [AT] 5:28 pm

Is it true that cicadas have a deathly disease?

Comment by Julianna Wojtowicz — October 7, 2005 [AT] 7:09 pm

What happens to a cicada shell when it’s left there?

Comment by Julianna Wojtowicz — October 7, 2005 [AT] 7:08 pm

what do cicadas eat and what eats them?

Comment by Julianna Wojtowicz — October 7, 2005 [AT] 7:04 pm

What do they eat and what eats them?

Comment by Julianna Wojtowicz — October 7, 2005 [AT] 7:02 pm

Hello I found a Cicada in a spider web (No spider in web) and rescued it.But it can’t fly it’s wings are messed up what do I do?

[Moderator: try to pick the web off its wing and then leave it in a bush. Maybe it will recover.]

Comment by Jennifer — September 17, 2005 [AT] 3:39 pm

do they have to sleep ? can they hurt u

[moderator: Sort of and no.]

Comment by caitlin — September 6, 2005 [AT] 4:57 pm

I live in Northern Virginia, and I’ve seen a few dead cicadas on the ground these past few weeks. They are black like the 17-year cicadas that we had last year, but they have white/greenish eyes. I’ve been hearing them singing in the trees all summer, but I thought they were the regular cicadas that we have every summer. Those are green though, aren’t they? These ones are black, and they look almost the same as the ones we had last year, only they don’t have red eyes. Are they regular annual cicadas or some special brood? Could they be Brood X and have emerged this year instead of last year? But why don’t they have red eyes, then?

Comment by Ashley — September 2, 2005 [AT] 5:20 pm

Hello,I am collecting cicada bodies and would gladly pay for shipping them if you have any. The area I am living in (Haverford, PA) does not have many this year. Please write and let me know. Thank you.

Anne

[Moderator: those are Tibicen, which are an annual species of cicada. Thanks too the massive emergence of Magicicadas, people have become “cicada aware”, and a now, finally noticing the annual species.]

Comment by Anne M — September 1, 2005 [AT] 12:52 pm

Fred,
For a great photo of Tibicen dorsata (Grand western cicada) and some locations, get Boris Kondratieff’s book “Cicadas of Colorado” CSU Press- it’s great.

Comment by david — August 29, 2005 [AT] 10:24 pm

OK, cicada professionals:

What is the ‘Grand Western Cicada? Looking through various websites, I have seen three different ‘grand western cicadas’ One series of photos clearly shows tibicen auletes, definately NOT the GW. Next series of photos from mid, upper western states, like Illinois, Iowa, etc, show a brightly yellow-marked black tibicen-type cicada. And another set, including the one on this site, shows a very un-tibicen like cicada, with a huge, oversized thorax, and a funny, undersized, narrow head. So just who/what/where is the “GRAND WESTERN CICADA, TIBICEN DORSATA?”
Fred

[Moderator: It’s this: Tibicen dorsata.]

Comment by Fred Berry — August 23, 2005 [AT] 6:01 pm

I have so many cicada in my trees that the trees are now getting rot and are dying. is there anyway i can save my 8 trees with out killing all the cicada? They are a childhood favorite and I wouldnt want to kill them but i just bought my home and the 8 trees have been there forever and id like to keep them too. please help! 2 trees are dead and need to be removed before they fall….please dont let more dye too.

Comment by April Nowell — August 23, 2005 [AT] 8:35 am

Wile on our deck today (August 21, 2005) I spotted and took a picture of this insect that I THINK might be a Tibicen Cicada? I don’t know, I have never seen a Cicada before. Of the pictures I found online, that seemed to be the closest match. Could someone confirm if it is a Cicada, and if so what kind it is? After reading the message here I went back out to take a photo with a newspaper, but it was gone. I have posted 4 pictures on my web site at
http://www.softechvt.com/cicada/cicada.htm.
Thanks!
Steve

[Moderator: it’s definitely a Tibicen, and probably a Tibicen pruinosa.]

Comment by Steve Smith — August 21, 2005 [AT] 11:25 am

Can anyone explain to me why I have been seeing cicada on my trees? I live in SC and this is the first time in the 20 years I have lived here that I have noticed these nasty insects. We used to have them in Northern VA about every 7 years but I though by moving down here they wouldn’t be here. I heard a bunch of them in the pine trees last night when I was in my backyard.

Comment by kim — August 16, 2005 [AT] 1:39 pm

My son found a cicada in the driveway today. It has been extremely hot outside so we brought it inside and made a little habitat for it which includes a pine branch, pine straw, dirt, and water on one end. It immediately grabbed ahold of the pine branch where it remains motionless. I prepared him it will likely have a very limited life span. No loud noises yet. Looks like he may mault and I know the kids will enjoy watching.

PS. I operate a municipal ULV insecticide fogging truck and I felt a little guilty leaving it outside. Plus as slow moving as this guy is, he would no doubt ended up as somebodys lunch.

[Moderator: Well, it could be a female — the females don’t make noise.]

Comment by Russ — August 15, 2005 [AT] 6:18 pm

Hi my son and I are trying to find out some info on cicada’s in our area. We live in Freehold, NJ and have been hearing them at night for weeks now. Tonight there is one perched on our screen door. From the websites I’ve read it says that there would’nt be any emerging in ’05, and that they only live for 2 weeks. They’ve definitly been out there more than 2 weeks.Or am I not getting the right info??
Thanks
Donna

[Moderator: in Jersey you have two basic types of cicadas: 1) the annual type, and 2) the periodical type which arrive every 17 years. Right now you’re seeing the annual type, which belong to the Genus Tibicen]

Comment by Donna D. — August 14, 2005 [AT] 10:39 pm

The Cicadas are here in the Upstate of South Carolina. I live in a little town southwest of Greenville SC called Honea Path. We have Oak and Chesnut Trees and the are singing wonderfully all day like I used to hear them in Southern France.
Now here I need an expert for answers? I heard the same noise last year. Not quite as prominent then this year but still I could hear them well every day.
This year I have been looking around and found some dead Magicicadas.
I am a little lost about this 17 year cicle. How could I have heard some last year and this year.
Are they other types of cicadas that live every year and make a similar noise?
Also as I go about enjoying these wonderful creatures of nature I hear being closer some high pitch singing less loud and frequent?
I would be thankful if anybody can give me more information. Suggestions of site with information and an excellent book about cicadas.
I feel in heaven, romantic and this wonderful noise while reading a book under a tree is an awesome feeling.
Edmond Schafeitel
Honea Path SC

Message by Edmond Schafeitel — August 14, 2005 [AT] 8:38 am

Comment by Edmond Schafeitel — August 14, 2005 [AT] 8:53 am

Yesterday I was at a picnic with my family and spotted what seemed to be a large dragonfly buried in the grass dead. So I kind of kicked at it and it started buzzing. Come to find out it was two cicadas apparently mating. Since my daughter was with me and she likes to collect bugs of all sorts, we put it in a container with leaves and twigs and a catipillar that she had found earlier. How rare is it to find them in the grass like that? Port Huron, MI

Comment by Todd Taylor — August 14, 2005 [AT] 7:53 am

[Moderator: that’s a Tibicen, not a Magicicada, but go on…]

For the last few nights I have had the opportunity to observe the behavior of the Magicicada in my back yard. I live in Marlboro, NJ and this year the air is filled with the sound of the percing buzzing calls of the male cicada and the approving clicks of the females.

I have been painting an official size NBA basketball half court on my driveway. My family is anxious for me to finish so I have been painting into the night with two flood lights. The first night I stayed out late painting (till 2:30 AM) I immediately became aware that this was not going to be a normal night in Marlboro. As night fell, the intensity of the buzzing calls increased and the cicada began gathering in the tree above me (a towering 150 year old red maple tree). As I painted, I noticed that fresh leaves from the tree where slowly raining down around me often accompanied by what appeared to be shoots of dead grass, with their tiny dry rootlets attached. The grass appeared to have been coated with a sticky substance and teased so that the roots and leaves looked like they had been curled.

The leaves also appeared to have been altered. Sections of the leaf to the right and left of the mid-line had been removed in a roughly symetrical pattern, often punctuated by holes on either side. The substance coating the leaves had an acrid musky unpleasant smell (at least to me). It also seamed to be tuning the fresh green leaves a yellow to orange to brown color.

As I continued to paint, the cicadas in the tree above me seemed to be agrivated by my presence. They continued to gather above and the raining down of leaves increased, some landing on me directly. When ever I repositioned the flood lights their calls rose in intensity.
Finally, a particularly large cicada flew down out of the tree and aimed itself directly at my head causing me to duck to avoid a collision. I quickly set the light down and darted away from the spot light, and into the dark shadows of my yard, to avoid a second aireal assault by the cicada. The giant insect touched down directly in the spotlight created by the lamp and took up position as close to the light as possible, It was then that I noticed the bright red glowing eyes of this cicada as it peered into the light and beyond it into the night. I quickly learned the rules of this relationship. Don’t touch the light and don’t block the light. If you do, the arial assaults resume. I finally reached an uneasy peace with the cicada. I could slowly move the light, without prompting aggressive behavior from the cicada, if I made sure to keep the insect in the most prominent position under the spotlight.

All kidding aside, the events I recorded here did happen to me in the middle of the night when I entered the cicada’s space under that old tree. On the succeding three nights it took me to finish the basketball court I encountered the same behavior. I feel I have a deeper understanding of these cicada behaviors now although it contradicts the official excepted version of their behavior.

Has anyone out there had a similar experience with cicadas in their area or witnessed any other unusual behaviors by cicadas? If so I’d love to read about them.

Comment by Daniel Ross — August 13, 2005 [AT] 11:35 pm

Here in Albion my brother and I found a cicada under our outdore table umbrella we don’t know why it was there.We had it in a container but we let it go at night when we were done looking at it it was kewl but we were scared to hold it so we looked up on this website if they bite. And it told us they dont but we did’nt want to take a chance of it laying eggs in us so we decided to show our mom and when we did she freaked out so then we showed our step father and he yelled at us for having it so then like I said we let it free and it didn’t fly cuz it was too cold out and it was raining so then we decided to put it back on our umbrella so it didn’t get wet so it could fly away the next morning and we didnt take it abdomin off like dum rejected people do just for their entertainment. have a nice day c ya bye.

Comment by Heather — August 11, 2005 [AT] 5:56 pm

will there be any more big emergences of magicicada near the baltimore area anytime soon? I’m not expecting any news making hatchings near my home but i would like to drive to a close by place with a fairly large brood brood x was huge in martinsberg wv last year for example.

Comment by Vince Matson — August 10, 2005 [AT] 8:58 pm

hi, i am just curious if what i’ve been seeing on my tree in my yard are cicadas!!! I have found several body casingswhich are brown in color and from the middle of the back of the head to the middle of their back or open with embelicalcords or some kind of feeding line inside I saved four that I found because I found them very interesting and was determined to find out what they were! Well, I will tell you!!!!!!!!!!! I went outside to let my dogs out around eleven thirty pm one evening last week and saw the same brown insect attacted to the tree with it’s front claws several hours later this amazing huge insect was on top of it!! It was about 4 inches long from head to end of body ( body was a tanish color) but the wings on this creature were amazing!! they were theabout 2 to 3 inches long and irridesant green, blue, pink pearly looking. The head was tan/light green in color with black eyes. Was i scared you ask you bettcha!!! because the are so huge!!!!!!!! But i was also intreged an so astonished that this big creature came out of that excoskeleton(is that what they are called I am new to this) i deal with dogs all day i am a dog groomer!!!! So anyway last night at eleven thirty pm I found another one on my tree so i made my boyfriend come out to confirm my findings!!!! Because i really don’t think he beleived me on how big they are! Boy was he amazed and it made him a little nervous we both walked right up to the tree it seemed to be looking right at us it was upon the casing it must have just shed its skin!! Because at first it looks as if they are feeding on another insect until they walk off the body casing and you can see the inside with the embilical cords inside. I came to the conclusion that after they leave their skin they dry their wings rest for a few minutes about 20 minutes or so and they fly away leaving the casing behind!! I have one that i found on the ground it wasn’t injured and so i put in an aquarium and i am patently waiting for it to shed its skin ! once it comes out i will set iot free I believe in that !!! If any one has any information on this creature please let me now………………sincerely, amy the bug lady!!!!

Comment by amy gentile — August 8, 2005 [AT] 4:23 pm

CICADAS ATTACKING GRAPES IN ASIA (Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, and Syria)
We are working on a project to assist grape growers in Asia to better manage cicadas that have been found on grape roots. Goals are to: (1) Determine the species of cicada, (2) create bio-control tactics to limit the damage done by the nymphs to grapevines.We would be interested in cicada projects which are being conducted to manage cicadas by any means (bio-control, cultural, and even chemical). Please respond to email Millern [AT] wooster.edu
Thank you

Comment by Nathaniel Miller — August 7, 2005 [AT] 6:56 pm

In Seattle, Aug 6, 2:30 pm, 80+ degreees (Thats quite hot for up here). I cam out of mygarage following a sound that reminded me of an air hose leak or a water hose still left on. I followed it past the house, and cupping my ears, followed the sound to a spot on a doug fir about 100′ high in my front yard. It was coming from what looks to be a squirrel’s nest aobut 30′ up. I had to ask my wife what it was, i have not ever heard these things before. It ended up being a sort of high pitched buzzing noise.

Comment by lloyd — August 7, 2005 [AT] 8:31 am

Well, they are driving me crazy here in eastern Iowa. Very Very loud in our partially wooded backyard. I know they have not been this loud for several years. When I was pumping gas nearby our home there was a cicada (the largest I have ever seen) climbing up the gas pump. It really startled me ( I swear it was staring at me! ) Ha! Anyway, is it possible this is the 17th year here in Cedar Rapids , Iowa? They have been everywhere and the sound at night is almost deafening.

Comment by sara — August 5, 2005 [AT] 10:05 pm

How come t.chloromera sometimes has a black thorax and neon green wings and sometimes doesn’t? My theory is that when they were in molt they were exposed to too much light, or there evolving iton another species.

Also whats the difference in color between t.lyricen and t.robinsonianus? And also when your identifing a cicada does the same species all look pretty much exactlly alike or does it very alot? And if you found one t.pruinosa in north carolina and another in florda would there proportion change any or just the color?

Comment by justin — August 3, 2005 [AT] 4:08 pm

Dear sirs,
In the last few days, that awful sound of the cicada has returned, unexpected in this portion of SE Ohio (Athens). This last weekend, we happened to drive to Canaan Valley, WV (near Davis) and stayed two days… NO NOISE! I assume from this that the current brood hatch is in SE Ohio, but not expansive to the east. Two questions: #1: I can’t find any map or prediction for a brood hatch (of the 17 year nor 13 year cycles) that match this year (looked on the UofMich website). What is the distribution for this year supposed to be? Could this be the 2004 brood running late? #2: Could a cicada “hitch a ride” on our car, transported to a new, virgin teritory like Canaan valley, and start a new infestation in 18 years? Alright, what if a PAIR of them hitched a ride under the hood of my car and dropped off there? I shudder to think what I have done to that paradise if this is true.
Thanks for any help you can supply me… I will share this with our TV viewers. -Kirk G, WTAP TV Weatherman

Comment by Kirk Greenfield — August 1, 2005 [AT] 7:47 am

When I went out for a smoke at about 3am in southern Ontario area, I saw a Cicada on the road, I caught it and I have it in a jar in my room. I thought my cat might get some fun out of viewing it from outside the jar… but as soon as my cat got in my room it went into killing mode. I couldnt go near my cat it was so agitated. Do Cicadas give off a scent that would scare off or perhaps entice predators?

(P.S, the next morning I let the Cicada go about its business back outside, unharmed by my cat)

Comment by Evan — July 29, 2005 [AT] 3:22 am

There is a cicada parked on the outside of my window right now. I live in South Nyack, NY. I happen to have a very deep phobia of bugs, especially flying ones, and the thought of having to deal with a cicada hatching… I didn’t think they came to Nyack!!!

Can someone please verify for me whether or not a brood is hatching right now? In Rockland county New York? I am shaking as I write this. Please let me know if I have to spend the summer elsewhere!!

I know they are hamless. Phobias are irrational. I just am terrified of them. I hope this is a fluke….

Comment by MzOuiser — July 26, 2005 [AT] 12:10 pm

These bugs are scary and it seems that I have a million of them in my yard, can someone tell me when are they going to go away.

Comment by Angelika — July 25, 2005 [AT] 11:14 pm

I have a green and black Cicada and I live in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Are they usually something that lives this far north?

Comment by Johnny — July 25, 2005 [AT] 8:47 am

Okay, I’m sorry if this is a Cicada loving site, but these things are DRIVING ME CRAZY! I live in Atlanta, GA — 2005. Please, please, please someone tell me that I will not have to deal with this here for another 17 years?

Comment by Heather — July 25, 2005 [AT] 7:13 am

hi ronald. i’m shay from south carolina. i “googled” cicadas florida. you should visit http://www.floridanature.org. yes, cicadas do thrive in florida. happy searching!!

Comment by Shay C — July 22, 2005 [AT] 8:45 am

I live and work here in NE Philadelphia. I am from Seattle and this is the first time I have seen this bug. We found one outside our office here at Naval Station NAVICP Philadelphia. I thought it was a giant fly at first, figured he was trying to escape the hurricane season down there. However, I found the pictures of a cicada on your site through yahoo and it was a direct match with the green one I saw. I Just wanted to let you know they were here. John

Comment by John Reynolds — July 22, 2005 [AT] 7:04 am

I found a cicada here in tampa at alafia state park along a bike trail that a ride frequently. I would like to know if this is just an abnormal finding? I kept the insect for proof. I grew up in DC and didnt think that a cicada could or would grow here? Can anyone give me some answers or direction on the possibility or cicadas in Tampa Florida? rcarkhuff [AT] hotmail.com

thanks

Comment by ronald carkhuff — July 21, 2005 [AT] 7:01 pm

O.K. I’M COMPLETELY HOOKED ON CICADAS NOW. I’M FROM THE SOUTH (ENOREE,SC) SO MY SUMMER NIGHTS, ALL MY LIFE, HAVE BEEN FILLED WITH THE BEAUTIFUL SONG OF THESE CREATURES (IT’S ALMOST DEAFENING/BUT LOVELY). BUT SINCE MY SIGHTING LAST NIGHT (I WATCHED ONE EMERGE!) I CAN’T GET ENOUGH INFORMATION!! MY SON AND I WENT OUT THIS AFTERNOON AND SAW SCUDS OF SHELLS UNDER TWO WILD CHERRY TREES. MY QUESTION IS…HOW DO YOU KNOW WHAT KIND OF CICADAS YOU ARE HEARING, OR WHAT KIND ARE IN MY AREA? (PS — LOVED COLLIN’S BAD JOKE COMMENT — HA! HA!)

Comment by Shay C — July 21, 2005 [AT] 6:48 pm

YES…I’VE WITNESSED IT TWICE MYSELF (IN UPSTATE SC). IT’S REALLY KINDA SAD. THE WHOLE COMMOTION OF IT IS HORRIBLE. DON’T REALLY KNOW MUCH ABOUT IT THOUGH.

Comment by Shay C — July 20, 2005 [AT] 9:14 pm

have you ever heard of a cicada killer it looks like a bee part wasp insect i saw one one time carring a cicada

Comment by holly — July 15, 2005 [AT] 1:43 am

Edward,
If you really want to keep a Cicada something like a terrarium would be more suitable. Cicadas have mouth sucking parts known as a beak and they actually suck the Xylem of plants. So what would be good is to get a branch from a tree and stick it in some water then put the cicada on the branch, if you’re lucky you will see it start to feed. They like to feed for about an hour.

Also, Cicadas don’t really live long in captivity maybe about a week to 10 days.

Gerry

Comment by Gerry — July 6, 2005 [AT] 9:34 pm

I just realized that in my excitement I didn’t tell anyone where it was that I found it. I’m in Elmont, N.Y. which is just over the border from Queens, NY.

Comment by edward b ford — July 4, 2005 [AT] 6:46 pm

July 4, 2005
I just found one attached to the louverd window of my basement. It was brown and in pre-emergence mode. I told my kids what it was and that we’d check it out in the morning to see if it had come out. A half an hour later I happend to be going out to the car and took a look at it and low and behold it was half way out. I waited another half hour taking photos before deciding to capture it. I now have it in a tupperware container about 5in deep by 8in wide and 14in long. I put some large wood chips for it to crawl on and some grass and some of the hedge. I also put some “honeysuckle” in there because I’m not sure what they eat. Any how I’d like any and all advice as to what I should do from here. I know that the Chinese keep them as pets. I’m sure that my girls would love that although they are very noisey.

Comment by edward b ford — July 4, 2005 [AT] 6:44 pm

I wanted to write that on june 28, 2005 in The Pas Manitoba Canada, i was out taking a walk and found a bug of the likes I have never seen before. I went home and looked it up and it was a cicada. I was surprised as it does not seem to be native to the north. I feel quite lucky to have found one- it was so big and beautiful (in its own way)
Brandy Stener

Comment by Brandy Stener — June 28, 2005 [AT] 7:34 pm

I wanted to write that on june 28, 2005 in The Pas Manitoba Canada, i was out taking a walk and found a bug of the likes I have never seen before. I went home and looked it up and it was a cicada. I was surprised as it does not seem to be native to the north. I feel quite lucky to have found one- it was so big and beautiful (in its own way)
Brandy Stener

Comment by Brandy Stener — June 28, 2005 [AT] 7:34 pm

Hi, I just wanted to say that on June 28 while out for a walk, I found a cicada. This is the first i have ever seen in my life! I did not even know what it was until i came home home and looked it up. Beautiful and interesting… So far as I know- they are not native to these areas so I feel lucky to have seen one. Brandy S.

Comment by Brandy Stener — June 28, 2005 [AT] 7:26 pm

When do the cicadas usually come out in Michigan? It is hot and muggy here and I am waiting for them.

Comment by Britta — June 24, 2005 [AT] 6:00 am

I found a cicada here in Central Texas in the track of my sliding glass door a few days ago, and it’s the smallest one I’ve ever seen in my life. I guess it never occured to me that they might come in different sizes. It’s small and brown (might have been green when alive), and about 3/4 inch from eyes to wing tip. I have an image I scanned of it with a ruler measuring it. I was actually pretty excited about it. Its always exciting to discover creatures you’ve never seen before, and Texas is full of those kinds of things. (I’m not from Texas) I’d also like to mention it occurred to me that the cicada sounds here are much different, more pleasant, less shrill than in Mississippi or North Carolina, and I also find that interesting. My parents and grammy mentioned the cicadas have not yet come out where they live in Mississippi, which is very unusual. They haven’t heard any this summer yet.

Comment by Mara — June 20, 2005 [AT] 7:38 am

Lately there has been a noise right outside my window at night that sounds just like a cicada. I’m fairly familiar with the sound cicadas make from my travels around the world. The thing is that I live in Western Washington State on the rainy side of the mountains, and I didn’t think that cicadas could live in this area because of the climate. Am I wrong? Can cicadas live in the wet and cold Pacific NW? If not, what sounds just like a cicada and lives in the Pacific NW (that sounds just liket he start to a bad joke)?

Comment by Collin — May 22, 2005 [AT] 1:39 pm

The American writer and naturalist Henry D. Thoreau mentions in his journal “a sort of black eyed septendecim” that began its call (at Concord, Massachusetts) around the first of June in 1854. Would you care to guess what particular species he might have referred to?

Thoreau sent a specimen to Harvard librarian and entomologist Thaddeus William Harris, who responded (apparently referring by “C. 17" to a print or a description in his own book on insects) thus: “The Cicada seems to be a female, and of course when living could not make the noise peculiar to the other sex. It differs from my specimens of Cicada septemdecim (& indeed still more from all the other species in my collection). It is not so large as the C. 17; it has more orange about its thorax; the wing-veins are not so vividly stained with orange, and the dusky zigzag on the anterior or upper wings, which is very distinct in the C. 17, is hardly visible in this specimen. It has much the same form as the female C. 17; but I must see the male in order to determine positively whether it be merely a variety or a different species.”

Comment by Bradley P. Dean — May 17, 2005 [AT] 3:31 pm

You might see some stagglers in the DC area. Nothing like last years emergence, but a few here and there.

Comment by Administrator — May 11, 2005 [AT] 7:33 am

Im curious will or when there be Cicada sight seeing in wash Dc area?

Comment by Merritt — May 10, 2005 [AT] 11:27 pm

Long Island’s Brood X disappointment.
Is it possible that the small emergence last year was simply an early emergence of Brood XIV four years early? Brood XIV is the dominant brood in this area and 4 year early emergences have been noted in many areas in the past. I suspect that previous appearances of Brood X on Long Island may have actually been actually members of Brood XIV.

Comment by AJay — May 9, 2005 [AT] 12:47 pm

August 1, 2005

Have you seen an unusually large number of cicadas this year?

Filed under: Chris Simon | Community Science | Okanagana | Proto-periodical — Dan @ 7:32 pm

Cicada.

Chris Simon a Professor, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology from the University of Connecticut asked us to post this on our site, and so we did.

Dear Cicadamaniacs,

If you have seen unusually large numbers of cicadas this year (or
last),and have not seen such numbers for a long time, can you please
report them to me? Chris dot Simon at UCONN dot edu? Please report
the location in which you saw the cicada, what month and year, how
long it has been since you have seen a similar emergence magnitude.

This seems to be an unusually good cicada year, maybe related to
unusually wet or otherwise favorable weather:

Dan Johnson from Southern Alberta, Canada reported an outbreak of
Okanagana synodica this year. He says: “I saw only a few between
1983 and 1985, then a few per year in 1986-88, then rare again, then
slightly more in 2000-2003, and only last year did they bloom, and
really with a bang (more than 1000X). My study area is southern
Alberta and Saskatchewan, mainly mixed grass sites in Alberta, plus
fescue foothills.” He had not seen an emergence like this in the 20
years he had worked there.

John Cooley reports Okanagana rimosa and canadensis as being very
dense this year in Northern Michigan and Dan Vanderpool reported that
an unidentified species of cicada was out in Northern Idaho that
residents noted they had never heard before (at least not in big
numbers) and one respondent had lived there for 30 years.

This record was from last year: Eric Toolson of New Mexico writes-
Last year, there was a widespread & heavy emergence of Tibicen
townsendii across a rather large area of central New Mexico
grassland. Prior to that, I knew of only one population in an area
of several hundred square miles, and that occupied an area of only
about 2 hectares. That population has been emerging in good numbers
for over a decade [in this location], but I never saw the species
anywhere else within a distance of several tens of miles in any
direction. I had formed the impression that although T. townsendii
was geographically widespread, its range was occupied by a relatively
few, widely-scattered, discrete populations that were failing to
occupy what seems to be a lot of contiguous suitable habitat.

Cicadas are known for their boom and bust years. It would be nice to
start keeping track of them.

Thanks very much,

Chris

July 27, 2005

Emergence of Prime Numbers as the Result of Evolutionary Strategy

Filed under: Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 4:12 am

Professor Douglas Galvao of the State University of Campinas has written a paper titled Emergence of Prime Numbers as the Result of Evolutionary Strategy. He is hoping to get feedback from the scientific / cicada community.

We investigate by means of a simple theoretical model the emergence of prime numbers as life cycles, as those seen for some species of cicadas.

You can download a PDF version of the paper. Windows users will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view it, and Mac users can simply use Preview.

You can contact Prof. Douglas Galvao, as well:

Prof. D.S. Galvao
Head of Applied Physics Department
State University of Campinas
Campinas – Sao Paulo – BRAZIL

July 8, 2005

Straggler pictures from Matt

Filed under: Magicicada | Matt Berger | Periodical Stragglers — Dan @ 11:20 pm

Matt Berger ent us some straggler pictures taken earlier this year:

Matt 2005 Straggler.

Matt 2005 Straggler.

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