Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

Genera of cicadas.

April 23, 2008

Cicada nymphs, chimneys and holes

Filed under: Brood XIV | Magicicada | Periodical | Roy Troutman — Dan @ 5:12 pm

Here are some new photos from Roy Troutman that will give you a good idea of what to look for when searching for signs of cicadas in your yard:

This is a pair of Magicicada nymphs, much like you might find when gardening or turning over logs or stones in your yard.

Magicicada nymphs

See those beige globs of soil amongst the leaves and debris? Those are called cicada chimneys. They are a sure sign that a cicada nymph is below the soil, and will emerge in a few days or weeks.

Magicicada chimneys

Look closely at this picture and you’ll see holes in the ground. Those are holes that cicada nymphs have dug, and they’re another sure sign of where a cicada will emerge.

Cicada holes

On May 1st we’ll start making predictions as to when they’ll start to emerge.

April 19, 2008

Reporting your cicada sightings

Filed under: Brood XIV | Magicicada — Dan @ 9:20 am

You can play an important role this year in documenting the Brood XIV 17 year cicada emergence. Brood maps are built using data from scientists and people like you. This year we have an opportunity to build a better Brood XIV map, but the scientists who collect the data will need your help.

Where to post your sightings

The two main web sites where you will be able to post your sightings this year are:

Both sites promise to feature interfaces that will easily allow you to enter your sighting.

Where else:

In the Massachusetts area (and beyond): Massachusetts Cicadas (Jerry Bunker).

In the Mid-Atlantic region: Cicadas.info.

April 18, 2008

Gene Kritsky’s new cicada site and Brood XIV news

Filed under: Brood XIV | Magicicada — Dan @ 4:22 am

Gene Kritsky’s new site

Gene Kritsky’s new enhanced cicada site is now up here: THE MOUNT’S CICADA WEB SITE. The new site will feature much of the information you’ll need to know for 2008, including maps, a place to enter your cicada sightings, podcasts and more. You’ll want to bookmark this site.

Gene’s cicada temperature experiments

Gene is looking for folks to report where and when a emergence occurs in their yard/neighborhood/local park etc. “I would like to find several of your readers who are willing to let us know the day that cicada emerge in good numbers in their locations. I would like to test the emergence formula at several sites.” A good number would be an aggregation of approximately 25 cicadas on a single tree. Like the picture on this page. So, be sure to head to Gene’s site and make a report if the opportunity arises.

Nymphs in Long Island

Andrew from Long Island sent us photos of nymphs and soil with many cicada tunnels from Satauket L.I. Looks like 2008 will be a good year for Long Island cicadas.

Some random linkage

Photo: A woman in a giant cicada costume.

Cicadas ready to emerge on east side.

April 12, 2008

Tymbals of the cicada of Genus Dundubia, Bangkok, Thailand

Filed under: Dundubia | Santisuk Vibul | Thailand — Dan @ 8:10 am

Santisuk Vibul sent us new photos of the tymbals of the cicada of Genus Dundubia, from Bangkok, Thailand.

Here’s a sample:

Tymbals of the cicada of Genus Dundubia by Santisuk Vibul. Thailand. 2008.

2008 Cicada Temperature Study

Filed under: Brood XIV | Gene Kritsky | Magicicada | Roy Troutman — Dan @ 7:21 am

Roy Troutman sent me these photos of temperature loggers that allow cicada experts, like Gene Kritsky, to measure the ground soil temperature, and improve their formulas for predicting Magicicada emergences.

We [Gene Kristsky and Roy Troutman] buried 3 temperature probes & tied one on a tree branch for air readings. The temperature loggers will take a very accurate reading every 10 minutes & after the emergence has started in full swing Gene will dig them up & hook them to a usb cable & download all the data to his laptop for study. He [Gene] is trying to determine the exact temperature that they will emerge so he can fine tune his formula for calculating emergence times.

Last year Gene’s emergence formula calculator (try it!) did a good job of predicting the Brood XIII emergence, and the 2008 temperature study should only improve it.

You might be able to participate in the 2008 cicada temperature study. If you’re interested, contact Gene Kritsky.

Temperature Logger

Temperature Logger

April 5, 2008

New cicada site

Filed under: Magicicada — Dan @ 7:20 am

John Cooley, one of the folks behind the Michigan Cicadas cicada site and the Cicada Central site now has a third site, which promises to have the best and most up to date Magicicada information. The new site is magicicada.org.

This site is designed to serve several purposes for 2008:

  • It is a place where we are directing people to report cicada emergences, so that the records may be collected and geocoded.
  • It’s got the best set of brood maps yet.
  • It mirrors the information on Cicada Central.
  • It will have better photos (the species photos for M. tredecim are second generation, but I’m working on even better ones).

March 2, 2008

New Cicada Photos from Adam Fleishman / ID this cicada

Filed under: Adam Fleishman | Cryptotympanini | Neotibicen — Tags: , , — Dan @ 12:35 pm

Here’s some new photos from photographer and cicada enthusiast Adam Fleishman. As always, they’re great photos. If you can help ID the first two photos, we’d appreciate it.

Neotibicen dealbatus:

Tibicen

Neotibicen dealbatus:

Tibicen

Neotibicen dorsatus (formerly T.dorsata):

T. dorsatus (formerly T.dorsata)

T. dorsata

Neotibicen superbus (formerly T. superba)

T. superba

Visit Adam’s website Cometmoth Sight and Sound

January 4, 2008

Pretty Brazilian Cicada: the Carineta diardi

Filed under: Argentina | Brazil | Carineta | Carinetini — Dan @ 4:54 pm

Pia Öberg from Sweden took this cicada photo back in 2004 at Hotel do Ypê in Itatiaia NP in Brazil. Thanks to Roy Troutman and cicada expert Allen Sanborn we were able to ID this pretty cicada as a Carineta diardi (Guérin-Méneville, 1829). In addition to Brazil, C. diardi is also found in Argentina.

Carineta diardi

Scientific classification:
Family: Cicadidae
Subfamily: Cicadettinae
Tribe: Carinetini
SubTribe: Carinetiina
Genus: Carineta
Species: Carineta diardi (Guérin-Méneville, 1829)

Some more links for you:

More of Pia’s photos on Flickr.

What a fun way to start the New Year. Happy New Year cicada maniacs!

December 20, 2007

Diemeniana euronotiana

Filed under: Australia | David Emery | Diemeniana — Tags: — Dan @ 9:17 pm

Here’s yet another wonderful cicada photo from David Emery in Australia: the Diemeniana euronotiana. The cicada is a mere 20mm in length, and they are now just out in the bushland around 1000m.

Diemeniana euronotiana

The Diemeniana euronotiana can be found in eastern NSW, south-eastern Victoria and Tasmania. They are most common in late November to January. (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p. 112)

December 4, 2007

Green Grocer

Filed under: Australia | Cyclochila — Tags: — Dan @ 12:14 pm

Bron sent us this Green Grocer photo taken in Orange NSW Australia.

Green Grocer Cicada

The scientific term for Green Grocers is Cyclochila australasiae. The come in other varieties such as the yellow colored Yellow Mondays and blue Blue Moons.

Cyclochila australasiae can be found in eastern Queensland, NSW and Victoria, and most emerge in October and November (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p. 61.).

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