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Genera of cicadas.

May 12, 2018

Cicadas of Asia

Filed under: Asia (Continent) | Genera | India | Indonesia | Japan | Korea | Malaysia | Singapore | Thailand | Vietnam — Dan @ 11:26 am

Many species shown on this page are not endemic to a single country. Typically if a cicada can be found in one country in Indo-China (Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam), it will be found in many others, as well as southern China.

Ambragaeana Chou & Yau, 1985

ambragaeana ambra photo by Michel Chantraine
Ambragaeana ambra Chou & Yao, 1985. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Ambragaeana ambra is found in Indo-China and China.

Angamiana Distant, 1890

angamiana floridula photo by Michel Chantraine
Angamiana floridula Distant, 1904

Angamiana floridula is found in Indo-China and China.

Ayuthia Distant, 1919

Ayuthia spectabile Distant, 1919
Ayuthia spectabile Distant, 1919.

Ayuthia spectabile is found in Indo-China and China.

Becquartina Kato, 1940

Becquartina electa by Michel Chantraine
Becquartina electa (Jacobi, 1902) from Thailand. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Becquartina electa is found in Indo-China and China.

Becquartina versicolor Boulard, 2005
Becquartina versicolor Boulard, 2005 Thailand. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Becquartina versicolor is found primarily in Thailand, but I imagine it can be found in adjacent nations as well.

Callogaeana Chou & Yao, 1985

Callogaeana festiva festiva
Callogaeana festiva festiva (Fabricius, 1803). Formerly Gaeana festiva.

Callogaeana festiva festiva is found in Indo-China and China.

Chremistica Stål, 1870

Cicadmalleus

Cryptotympana Stål, 1861

cryptotympana aquila Photo by Michel Chantraine
Cryptotympana aquila (Walker, 1850) from Thailand. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Cryptotympana aquila has a huge range from Korea south to Indo-China, as well as, Borneo, Sumatra and Brunei.

C. arata A cicada photo from South Korea
Female Cryptotympana atrata (Fabricius, 1775) from Korea. Photo by Jon Allen.

Cryptotympana atrata has a large range from Indo-China north to Korea.

Cryptotympana mandarina. Michel chantraine.
Cryptotympana mandarina Distant, 1891. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Distantalna Boulard, 2009

Distantalna splendida formerly Tosena splendida
Distantalna splendida (Distant, 1878)

Dundubia Amyot & Audinet-Serville, 1843

Dundubia
Dundubia sp. Photo by Santisuk Vibul.

Dundubia spiculata
Dundubia spiculata Noualhier, 1896. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Euterpnosia Matsumura, 1917

Euterpnosia chibensis photos by Osamu Hikino. Japan.
Euterpnosia chibensis. Photo by Osamu Hikino.

Formotosena Kato, 1925

Formotosena montivaga (Distant, 1889)
Formotosena montivaga (Distant, 1889). Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Gaeana Amyot & Audinet-Serville, 1843

Gaeana cheni
Gaeana cheni Chou & Yao, 1985. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Hyalessa China, 1925

Hyalessa maculaticollis maculaticollis photo by Osamu Hikino. Japan.Hyalessa maculaticollis maculaticollis (de Motschulsky, 1866). Photo by Osamu Hikino.

Huechys Amyot & Audinet-Serville, 1843

Huechys sanguinea
Huechys sanguinea (Degeer, 1773). Photo by Michel Chantraine.

H. sanguinea can be found throughout Asia, including China, Indo-China, India & Pakistan.

Lyristes Horváth, 1926

Depending on who you ask, the Genus is Lyristes or Tibicen, so I’ll mention both. Wait — not it’s Auritibicen.

A. flammatus
Lyristes flammatus or Tibicen flammatus (Distant, 1892)

L. flammatus aka T. flammatus (there is some dispute over the name of the genus) can be found in Japan, Korea and China.

Macrosemia Kato, 1925

Macrosemia chantrainei Boulard, 2003
Macrosemia chantrainei Boulard, 2003. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Macrosemia tonkiniana (Jacobi, 1905)
Macrosemia tonkiniana (Jacobi, 1905). Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Macrosemia umbrata Cicada Found in Arunachal Pradesh, India by Raghu Ananth
Macrosemia umbrata. Photo by Raghu Ananth.

Orientopsaltria Kato, 1944

Orientopsaltria beaudouini Boulard, 2003
Orientopsaltria beaudouini Boulard, 2003. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Platylomia Stål, 1870

Platylomia radah
Platylomia radah (Distant, 1881). Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Platypleura Amyot & Audinet-Serville, 1843

Platypleura capitata by Raghu Ananth, taken near Mysore, India:
Platypleura capitata (Olivier, 1790). Photo by Raghu Ananth.

Pomponia Stål, 1866

Purana Distant, 1905

Salvazana Distant, 1913

Salvazana mirabilis imperialis Distant, 1918
Salvazana mirabilis imperialis Distant, 1918. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Salvazana mirabilis
Salvazana mirabilis mirabilis Distant, 1913

Sulphogaeana Chou & Yao, 1985

Mating Gaeana sulphurea from Bhutan taken by Jeff Blincow
Sulphogaeana sulphurea (Westwood, 1839).

Tacua Amyot & Audinet-Serville, 1843

Tacua speciosa (Illger, 1980) photos from Malaysia. The author of the image wishes to be anonymous.
Tacua speciosa (Illger, 1980). Photo by Anonymous.

Tailanga Distant, 1890

Tailanga binghami
Tailanga binghami Distant, 1890. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

T. binghami is found in China and the countries of Indo-China.

Tosena Amyot & Audinet-Serville, 1843

Tosena albata
Tosena albata
Distant, 1878. Photo by Michel Chantraine.

Trengganua Moulton, 1923

Blog Catagories:

Links for further research:

Southeast Asia

India

Japan

Cicada species names and locations verified using The Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha) by Allen F Sanborn.

April 29, 2018

Cicada habitat in peril in Connecticut

Filed under: Community Science | Megatibicen — Dan @ 7:05 am

Update: The hearing on the development of this property is May 14 at 7 p.m. but researchers can write testimony now and send it to Wallingford Planning and Zoning Commission, Wallingford Town Hall, 45 S. Main St., Wallingford, CT 06492.

Megatibicen auletes, the largest cicada in North America:
Megatibicen auletes, the largest cicada in North America

Anytime we remove trees, we reduce cicada habitat. Remove a small forest of trees and we might destroy the habitat for an entire species. North American cicada species need trees to survive and live out their life cycles, and certain cicada species require specific types of trees and specific environmental conditions. This is the case for Megatibicen auletes, also known as the Northern Dusk Singing Cicada, which prefers oak trees growing in sandy soil.

Megatibicen auletes habitat is in peril in Wallingford, Connecticut, where a rare sandplain is about to be excavated and turned into space for a warehouse. Read this article: Environmental concerns prompt questions of state oversight in Wallingford. After reading the article, it seems like there is still a chance to reverse plans to develop this area. I hope it does not happen, for the sake of the cicadas.

Megatibicen auletes is the largest cicada in North America. You can hear its remarkable call right after sunset in late summer months. I wonder how many residents of the Wallingford area knew that the largest cicada in North America lived in their community. I wonder how many people have heard the auletes’ scream right after sunset and wondered what creature made that sound. Hopefully, people will have another chance to hear them this summer, rather than the sounds of machines grinding up a forest, or the silence of yet another warehouse parking lot.

January 6, 2018

New paper about Brood XXII Magicicadas

There is a new paper out about Brood XXII, titled Evolution and Geographic Extent of a Surprising Northern Disjunct Population of 13-Year Cicada Brood XXII (Hemiptera: Cicadidae, Magicicada). I helped with the field work for this paper, traveling through Ohio and Kentucky with Roy Troutman, recording the locations of periodical cicadas.

Brood XXII, a brood of Magicicada periodical cicadas with a 13-year lifecycle, exists in Louisiana & Mississippi, and Ohio & Kentucky with no geographic connection between them (the two groups are geographically isolated). The paper discusses the similarities and differences between the two groups.

You can read and download the paper for free.

Citation for the paper:
Gene Kritsky, Roy Troutman, Dan Mozgai, Chris Simon, Stephen M Chiswell, Satoshi Kakishima, Teiji Sota, Jin Yoshimura, John R Cooley; Evolution and Geographic Extent of a Surprising Northern Disjunct Population of 13-Year Cicada Brood XXII (Hemiptera: Cicadidae, Magicicada), American Entomologist, Volume 63, Issue 4, 12 December 2017, Pages E15—E20, https://doi.org/10.1093/ae/tmx066

December 10, 2017

Four new species of Semia from Vietnam

Filed under: David Emery | Pham Thai | Psithyristriini | Semia | Vietnam | Young June Lee — Dan @ 3:41 pm

Four new species of Semia cicadas living in Vietnam were described in 2017: Semia magna, Semia spiritus, Semia pallida, and Semia albusequi.

Here’s the details on the paper:

Title: Descriptions of four new species of Semia Matsumura (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Psithyristriini) from Vietnam, with a key to the species of Semia
Authors: David Emery, Young June Lee, & Thai Pham.
Year: 2017
Publication: Zootaxa. 4216. 153-166.
Document link: https://biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4216.2.2
Abstract:

This paper provides descriptions of four new species of the genus Semia Matsumura, 1917 from Vietnam: Semia magna sp. nov., Semia spiritus sp. nov., Semia pallida sp. nov., and Semia albusequi sp. nov. A key to the 13 species of Semia is provided.

The World Cup Cicada, Chremistica ribhoi

Filed under: Chremistica | India | Periodical | Sudhanya Hajong | Tacuini (Cryptotympanini) — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

Update: this cicada has a Leap-Year Brood (2024) as well as a World-Cup Brood (2026)! Both have 4-year year life cycle.

cicada soccer

Chremistica ribhoi Hajong and Yaakop 2013 is a cicada that lives in the Ri-Boi district of India. C. ribhoi is known as the World Cup cicada because it emerges every four years in synch with the World Cup association football (soccer) tournament.

C. ribhoi is known locally as Niangtasar. It only lives in a very small area: Saiden village (25°51’37.1″N 91°51’16.3″E) and Lailad/Nongkhyllem Wildlife Sanctuary (25°55’09.7″N 91°46’25.0″E) situated on the northern part of the state of Meghalaya. The cicada can be identified by the presence of two white spots on either side of the anterior abdominal segment.

Researcher Sudhanya Hajong is gearing up to study these cicadas since this is the year they will emerge. Ri-Boi area locals use these cicadas as a food source and fish bait. These cicadas are threatened by deforestation (cutting down forests for agricultural purposes). Sudhanya plans to educate locals about conserving them and protecting their habitat.

Photos of Chremistica ribhoi.

Most of the facts in the post come from the following document: Hajong, S.R. 2013. Mass emergence of a cicada (Homoptera: Cicadidae) and its capture methods and consumption by villagers in ri-bhoi district of Meghalaya. Department of Zoology, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong – 793 022, Meghalaya, India.

Thanks to Chris Simon of The Simon Lab at UCONN for providing the information that made this post possible.

Note: the image in this article is not an accurate depiction of C. ribhoi. 🙂


There’s also a brood of C. ribhoi that emerges during Leap-years.

November 5, 2017

A new paper about Kikihia hybridization

Filed under: Chris Simon | Kikihia | New Zealand | Papers and Documents — Dan @ 10:59 am

There’s a new paper from Sarah E. Banker, Elizabeth J. Wade, and Chris Simon titled “The confounding effects of hybridization on phylogenetic estimation in the New Zealand cicada genus Kikihia”.

Here are the highlights:

  • Tested validity of an unexpected “Westlandica” mitochondrial clade with nuclear loci.
  • Phylogenetic signal and pattern differ dramatically among nuclear genes but always weak on South Island.
  • No conflict between nuclear concatenation vs species trees from multiple methods.
  • Three nuclear species trees support major North Island but not South Island mitochondrial clades.

Here’s the citation information:

Sarah E. Banker, Elizabeth J. Wade, Chris Simon, The confounding effects of hybridization on phylogenetic estimation in the New Zealand cicada genus Kikihia, Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Volume 116, November 2017, Pages 172-181, ISSN 1055-7903, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2017.08.009.
(https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1055790317302348)

November 4, 2017

Fiji 8-year periodical Nanai aka Raiateana knowlesi

Filed under: Fiji | Periodical | Raiateana | Tacuini (Cryptotympanini) — Dan @ 1:25 am

Fiji $100 note

This cicada will next emerge in 2025.

Update (11/4/2017): from Facebook, it looks like folks are finding them. Here’s an image.

Update (9/13/2017): the Nanai have begun to emerge! This cicada last emerged in 2009 in Nadroga-Navosa and Serua Provinces, and now again emerge in 2017. People in Fuji will be able to report sightings to nanai-tracker.herokuapp.com.

Notes from Chris Simon:

Early this morning I got the first Reports of the 8-year periodical Nanai emerging in Navosa, Fiji! Some people in that area had them for dinner.

This confirms earlier reports of the eight-year periodicity. There was some uncertainty because the original specimens were dated (1906) a year later than they would be if on the current 8-year schedule.

Duffels and Ewart (1988, The Cicadas of the Fiji, Samoa, and Tonga Islands, their taxonomy and Biogeograohy) noted that “Until recently the present species is only known from three males collected in “Fijii” in 1906 by C. Knowles.” Duffels was not able to describe them when he first saw the specimens because they were missing the male genitalia. After obtaining, “a series of females and two males” from Dick Watling and Andrew Laurie in 1986, Duffels was able to assign it to the genus Raiateana. There is one other species of Raiateana in Fiji, R. kuruduadua (two subspecies in Fiji and one in Samoa) but it is not periodical as far as we know.

You might be familiar with American periodical cicadas (Magicicada) and the World-cup synchronized Chremistica ribhoi of India, but Fiji has a periodical cicada too: the 8-year periodical Nanai cicada aka Raiateana knowlesi.

It also appears on Fiji’s $100 note.

There’s even a local legend about the cicada.

More information:

Thanks to Chris Simon of the University of Connecticut for this information.

More shots of the Fiji $100 note and the folder it comes in:

Fiji $100 note

Fiji $100 note

October 27, 2017

14 new species of grassland, woodland & scrubland Myopsalta cicadas

Filed under: Australia | L. W. Popple | Myopsalta — Dan @ 11:29 pm

Lindsay Popple published a new paper describing 14 new species of grassland, woodland & scrubland Myopsalta cicadas. Download it from Zootaxa.

Here are the particulars:

Volume: Zootaxa 4340 (1): 001—098; 2017.
Title: A revision of the Myopsalta crucifera (Ashton) species group (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettini) with 14 new species from mainland Australia
Author: LINDSAY W. POPPLE

Abstract:

The genus Myopsalta Moulds is distributed throughout much of Australia. Previous studies have associated several undescribed species with the Myopsalta crucifera (Ashton) species complex. The present study informally divides the cicadas in the genus Myopsalta into two species groups. It provides a revision of the M. crucifera species group, which includes redescriptions of M. crucifera s. str. and M. mackinlayi (Distant). The identity of the latter species is further refined and attributed to material formerly presented under the name Myopsalta atrata (Goding & Froggatt). In addition to the redescriptions, 14 new species belonging to the M. crucifera species group are described, including M. albiventris n. sp., M. bassiana n. sp., M. chrysopedia n. sp., M. gordoni n. sp., M. leona n. sp., M. longicauda n. sp., M. majurae n. sp., M. melanobasis n. sp., M. parvula n. sp., M. platyptera n. sp., M. riverina n. sp., M. septa n. sp., M. umbra n. sp. and M. xerograsidia n. sp. A key to species in the genus Myopsalta is provided. Standard morphological descriptions and descriptions of calling songs unique to each species are included along with a discussion on different song types in the M. crucifera species group.

And the announcement from Twitter:

Visit Lindsay’s cicada website.

September 30, 2017

Avoid “Locust Loco”

Filed under: Folklore | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 4:39 pm

A nice illustration that shows the difference between Magicicada periodical cicadas & Locust grasshoppers from the April 18, 1919 edition of The Washburn Leader, Washburn, North Dakota.

Once you see them up-close, it’s clear that cicadas are not locusts. Nearly 98 years later, people still call cicadas “locusts” though.

1919

September 21, 2017

2017 Cicada Summer

Filed under: Neotibicen | News — Tags: , , , — Dan @ 8:48 pm

Today is September 21st, 2017 — the last day of Summer, in central New Jersey. Leaves of maple trees have started to turn scarlet and yellow. Oaks are dropping their acorns. The few, remaining Morning (Neotibicen tibicen tibicen) and Linne’s (Neotibicen linnei) cicadas sound decrepit and tired — like tiny breaking machines, low on fuel and oil. I found one dead Morning cicada lying on a sidewalk — its body crushed. Here in New Jersey, at least, the cicada season is all but over.

Molting Neotibicen tibicen tibicen in Little Silver, NJ. August 26st.

As cicada years go, this one had ups and downs. It wasn’t as awesome as 2016, but I can’t blame the cicadas.

Downs:

  • No group cicada hunts this year. My cicada hobby is much more fun when I can share it with other people.
  • A skunk took over my favorite spot for finding Morning Cicada nymphs.
  • I had to go on a business trip during what would have been the best weeks for finding nymphs.
  • I forgot to bring my good audio recording equipment to Titusville, NJ & Washington Crossing, PA, and only got so-so iPhone audio of the weird N. winnemanna there.

Ups:

  • I found a new Megatibicen auletes location in Highlands, NJ. The location is about 50 miles north of where I usually find them.
  • I found more Megatibicen auletes exuvia than ever at the Manchester, NJ location where my friends and I normally hunt for auletes. Normally I find one or two — this year I found dozens. I found no adult specimens, other than those singing in the trees at dusk.
  • I did find enough exuvia & Morning cicadas that I should be happy.

Here’s some images from this summer:

Neotibicen tibicen tibicen with bad wing. The indigo color is fascinating. August 9th.
Neotibicen tibicen tibicen with bad wing

A Neotibicen tibicen tibicen found during a lunchtime stroll. September 1st.
Neotibicen tibicen tibicen 5

A female Neotibicen canicularis or maybe pink N. linnei found in Little Silver, NJ. August 25th.
female Neotibicen canicularis

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