Cicada Mania

Dedicated to cicadas, the most amazing insects in the world.

Genera of cicadas.

February 29, 2020

Brood X Magicicada photos by Mark Goldberg from 2004

Filed under: Brood X | Magicicada | Photos & Illustrations — Dan @ 7:46 am

Brood X Magicicada photos by Mark Goldberg from 2004. Maryland.

Brood X Magicicada photo by Mark Goldberg from 2004, Maryland.

Brood X Magicicada photo by Mark Goldberg from 2004, Maryland.

Brood X Magicicada photo by Mark Goldberg from 2004, Maryland.

Brood X Magicicada photo by Mark Goldberg from 2004, Maryland.

Brood X Magicicada photo by Mark Goldberg from 2004, Maryland.

Brood X Magicicada photo by Mark Goldberg from 2004, Maryland.

Brood X Magicicada photos by Phil Smith from 2004

Filed under: Brood X | Magicicada | Photos & Illustrations — Dan @ 7:41 am

Brood X Magicicada photos by Phil Smith from 2004. Indiana.

Brood X Magicicada photo by Phil Smith from 2004. Indiana.

Brood X Magicicada photo by Phil Smith from 2004. Indiana.

Magicicada Brood X photo by Frank Mefford from 2004

Filed under: Brood X | Magicicada | Photos & Illustrations — Dan @ 7:36 am

Magicicada Brood X photo by Frank Mefford from 2004. Kentucky.

Magicicada Brood X photo by Frank Mefford from 2004. Kentucky.

Magicicada Brood X photo by Walter Hanig from 2004

Filed under: Brood X | Magicicada | Photos & Illustrations — Dan @ 7:32 am

Magicicada Brood X photo by Walter Hanig from 2004. Washington, D.C.

Magicicada Brood X photo by Walter Hanig from 2004. Washington, D.C.

Magicicada Brood X photos by Steve Groh from 2004

Filed under: Brood X | Magicicada | Photos & Illustrations — Dan @ 7:26 am

Magicicada Brood X photos by Steve Groh from 2004. Cincinnati, Ohio.

Magicicada Brood X photos by Steve Groh from 2004

Magicicada Brood X photos by Steve Groh from 2004

Magicicada Brood X photos by Steve Groh from 2004

Magicicada Brood X photos by Steve Groh from 2004

Diceroprocta olympusa photos by Joe Green

Filed under: Diceroprocta | Joe Green | Photos & Illustrations | United States — Tags: — Dan @ 7:18 am

Diceroprocta olympusa photos by Joe Green from 2007. Florida.

Diceroprocta  olympusa photos by Joe Green from 2007.

Diceroprocta  olympusa photos by Joe Green from 2007.

Diceroprocta  olympusa photos by Joe Green from 2007.

Diceroprocta  olympusa photos by Joe Green from 2007.

February 28, 2020

Photos of Magicicada cicadas with white & blue eyes by Roy Troutman

Filed under: Brood X | Eye Color | Magicicada | Periodical | Photos & Illustrations | Roy Troutman — Dan @ 4:22 pm

Photos of Magicicada cicadas with white & blue eyes by Roy Troutman from 2004.

Photo of a Magicicada cicada with blue eyes by Roy Troutman.
Photo of a Magicicada cicada with blue eyes by Roy Troutman.

Photo of a Magicicada cicada with blue eyes by Roy Troutman.
Photo of a Magicicada cicada with blue eyes by Roy Troutman.

Photo of a Magicicada cicada with white eyes by Roy Troutman.
Photo of a Magicicada cicada with white eyes by Roy Troutman.

Photo of a Magicicada cicada with white eyes by Roy Troutman.
Photo of a Magicicada cicada with white eyes by Roy Troutman.

Magicicada Photos by Gwen Elferdink from Brood X, 2004

Filed under: Magicicada | Periodical | Photos & Illustrations — Dan @ 4:07 pm

17-year Magicicada Photos by Gwen Elferdink from Brood X 2004.

Magicicada photo by Gwen Elferdink

Magicicada photo by Gwen Elferdink

Magicicada photo by Gwen Elferdink

Magicicada photo by Gwen Elferdink

November 9, 2019

Derotettiginae subfamily nov. as a new, monogeneric, fifth cicada subfamily

Filed under: Derotettix — Dan @ 10:27 am

There’s a new cicada subfamily: Derotettiginae.

The five subfamilies are:

  • Derotettiginae (NEW)
  • Tibicininae
  • Tettigomyiinae
  • Cicadettinae
  • Cicadinae

Here’s the paper:

Chris Simon, Eric R L Gordon, M S Moulds, Jeffrey A Cole, Diler Haji, Alan R Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Michelle Kortyna, Katherine Nazario, Elizabeth J Wade, Russell C Meister, Geert Goemans, Stephen M Chiswell, Pablo Pessacq, Claudio Veloso, John P Mccutcheon, Piotr Lukasik, Off-target capture data, endosymbiont genes and morphology reveal a relict lineage that is sister to all other singing cicadas, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, , blz120, https://doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blz120

Here’s the abstract:

Phylogenetic asymmetry is common throughout the tree of life and results from contrasting patterns of speciation and extinction in the paired descendant lineages of ancestral nodes. On the depauperate side of a node, we find extant ‘relict’ taxa that sit atop long, unbranched lineages. Here, we show that a tiny, pale green, inconspicuous and poorly known cicada in the genus Derotettix, endemic to degraded salt-plain habitats in arid regions of central Argentina, is a relict lineage that is sister to all other modern cicadas. Nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenies of cicadas inferred from probe-based genomic hybrid capture data of both target and non-target loci and a morphological cladogram support this hypothesis. We strengthen this conclusion with genomic data from one of the cicada nutritional bacterial endosymbionts, Sulcia, an ancient and obligate endosymbiont of the larger plant-sucking bugs (Auchenorrhyncha) and an important source of maternally inherited phylogenetic data. We establish Derotettiginae subfam. nov. as a new, monogeneric, fifth cicada subfamily, and compile existing and new data on the distribution, ecology and diet of Derotettix. Our consideration of the palaeoenvironmental literature and host-plant phylogenetics allows us to predict what might have led to the relict status of Derotettix over 100 Myr of habitat change in South America.

Tweets from Chris Simon @CicadaScience announcing the new subfamily:

August 7, 2019

Check for first instar periodical cicada nymphs

Filed under: Eggs | Magicicada | Nymphs | Periodical — Dan @ 4:26 am

It’s been about six weeks since the emergence of Brood VIII in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Oklahoma. Now (first week of August) is a good a time as any to check for periodical cicada nymphs that have hatched from eggs laid in branches. Once they hatch they’ll find their way to the ground, where they’ll find and begin feeding on roots for the next 17 years.

Look on branches where cicada laid their eggs.

An illustraition of egg nests:
An illustraition of egg nests:

A nymph on a branch with adult male finger for comparison:
Periodical Cicada Nymph

Close up:
Periodical Cicada Nymph

Another close up:
Periodical Cicada Nymph

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