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People who have contributed cicada photos, videos or other media and information to cicadamania.com.

March 7, 2020

Fidicina mannifera from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem.

Filed under: Brazil | Fidicina | Fidicinini | Leonardo Milhomem — Tags: — Dan @ 8:13 am

Fidicina mannifera from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem. 2005.

Fidicina mannifera from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem.

Majeorona aper from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem

Filed under: Brazil | Fidicinini | Leonardo Milhomem | Majeorona — Tags: — Dan @ 8:12 am

Majeorona aper from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem. 2005.

Majeorona aper from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem. 2005.

Quesada gigas from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem

Filed under: Brazil | Hyantiini | Leonardo Milhomem | Quesada — Tags: — Dan @ 8:10 am

Quesada gigas from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem. 2005.

Quesada gigas from Brazil, Photo by Leonardo Milhomem

More Lucky Cicada Keychain Images

Filed under: Lucky Cicada Key Chain | Roy Troutman | Toys and Amusements — Dan @ 6:16 am

Back in the 1990’s Archie McPhee/Accoutrements distributed the Lucky Cicada, a toy with a keyring that would sing when you squeezed its abdomen. Its eyes lit up green too.

All we have now are memories and memorabilia, because they aren’t making them anymore. That said, there are manufacturers in China who have the plans and will make them. That’s a story for another day. Thanks to Roy Troutman for the images.

Front and back packaging:
Packaging

The keychain and packaging:
Keychain and packaging

4 different paint jobs. And red eyes! Collect them all!
4 different types

Magicicada nymphs found by Elias, part 2

Filed under: Elias Bonaros | Magicicada | Nymphs | Periodical — Dan @ 6:02 am

Continuing from part 1, Elias Bonaros did some digging and took these photos of first and second instar Magicicada periodical cicadas on a warm winter day (March 21, 2010).

Now you know what cicadas look like when they’re underground!

Generally speaking the ones with the bulbous abdomens are second instar, and the smaller ones with the less bulbous or not bulbous abdomens are first instar.

Magicicada Nymphs found by Elias, part 1

Filed under: Elias Bonaros | Magicicada | Nymphs | Periodical — Dan @ 5:50 am

Have you every wondered what cicadas look like when they’re underground? Elias Bonaros did some digging and took these photos of first and second instar Magicicada periodical cicadas on a warm winter day (March 21, 2010). Magicicadas have 5 instars, or phases of development. Each phase has a slightly different appearance.

This is a probable second instar nymph of Magicicada septendecim (Periodical cicada) from the 2008 Brood XIV emergence. Dug up from beneath an oak tree. It was living approximately 4-6 inches from the ground surface. Temperature 70 degrees.

Elias cicada nymph

These are probable first and second instar nymphs of Magicicada septendecim (Periodical cicada) from the 2008 Brood XIV emergence. Dug up from beneath an oak tree. They were living approximately 4-6 inches from the ground surface. Temperature 70 deg.

Elias Magicicada nymphs

March 1, 2020

More of Joe Green’s Neocicada hieroglyphica photos from 2007, Florida

Filed under: Cicadini | Joe Green | Neocicada — Tags: — Dan @ 7:54 pm

Joe Green’s Neocicada hieroglyphica photos from 2007, Florida, part 2:

Joe Green’s Neocicada hieroglyphica photos from 2007, Florida

Filed under: Cicadini | Joe Green | Neocicada — Tags: — Dan @ 7:48 pm

Joe Green’s Neocicada hieroglyphica photos from 2007, Florida, part 1:

Mystery Cicada Object

Filed under: Cicada Arts | Roy Troutman — Dan @ 12:20 pm

Roy Troutman sent us photos of this mysterious cicada-shaped object. We don’t know what it is, but it looks cool.

Front:
Mystery Cicada Object

Back:
Mystery Cicada Object

Wings spread:
Mystery Cicada Object

Okanagana rimosa exuvia photos by Elias Bonaros

Filed under: Elias Bonaros | Exuvia | Okanagana | Tibicinini — Tags: — Dan @ 9:45 am

Okanagana rimosa exuvia (skins, shells) photos by Elias Bonaros. From 2010, I believe.

Note the dark lines on the abdomen — that’s an easy way to distinguish Okanagana exuvia from other types of cicadas.

Side view

dorsal view

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