Cicada Mania

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March 19, 2020

White-Eyed Magicicada found by Jane and Evan Skinner of Troy, MO

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Magicicada — Dan @ 6:32 pm

White-Eyed Magicicada found by Jane and Evan Skinner of Troy, MO. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-Eyed Magicicada found by Jane and Evan Skinner of Troy, MO. Brood XIX. 2011.

White Eyed cicada found by Melissa Ham in Nashville, TN

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Magicicada — Dan @ 6:29 pm

White Eyed cicada found by Melissa Ham in Nashville TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White Eyed cicada found by Melissa Ham in Nashville TN

White-eyed cicada from Serena Cochrane of Gerald, MO

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Magicicada — Dan @ 6:26 pm

White-eyed cicada from Serena Cochrane of Gerald, MO. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed cicada from Serena Cochrane of Gerald, MO. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed Magicicada from Meagan Lang of Nashville, TN

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Magicicada — Dan @ 6:23 pm

White-eyed Magicicada from Meagan Lang of Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed Magicicada from Meagan Lang of Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed Magicicada from Meagan Lang of Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed Magicicada from Meagan Lang of Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed Magicicada from Meagan Lang of Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White-eyed Magicicada from Meagan Lang of Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White eyed Magicicada from Joey Simmons of Nashville, TN

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Magicicada — Dan @ 6:18 pm

White eyed Magicicada from Joey Simmons of Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

White eyed Magicicada from Joey Simmons of Nashville, TN. Brood XIX. 2011.

Brood XIX Magicicada photos from North Eastern Arkansas taken by David Green

Filed under: Brood XIX | Magicicada — Tags: — Dan @ 5:15 pm

Brood XIX Magicicada tredecassini photos from North Eastern Arkansas taken by David Green. 2011.

Brood XIX Magicicada photos from North Eastern Arkansas taken by David Green. 2011.

Brood XIX Magicicada photos from North Eastern Arkansas taken by David Green. 2011.

Black-eyed Magicicada by Hester Bass

Filed under: Brood XIX | Eye Color | Magicicada — Dan @ 5:13 pm

Black-eyed Magicicada by Hester Bass. Brood XIX. 2011.

Black-eyed Magicicada by Hester Bass. Brood XIX. 2011.

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri

Filed under: Brood XIX | Magicicada | Molting — Dan @ 5:02 pm

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri. 2011. Brood XIX.

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri.

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri.

Molting Magicicada by Kevin Anderson of Oakville Missouri.

March 16, 2020

Brood XIX stragglers in NC, 2010

Filed under: Brood XIX | Lenny Lampel | Magicicada | Periodical Stragglers — Tags: — Dan @ 5:38 pm

Magicicada tredecassini by Lenny Lampel Natural Resources Coordinator Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Charlotte, NC. 2010.

Magicicada tredecassini (abdomen), Lower McAlpine Greenway 051010 (by Lenny Lampel):
Magicicada tredecassini (abdomen), Lower McAlpine Greenway 051010 (by Lenny Lampel)

Magicicada tredecassini, Lower McAlpine Greenway 051010 (by Lenny Lampel):
Magicicada tredecassini, Lower McAlpine Greenway 051010 (by Lenny Lampel)

Magicicada tredecassini exuvia, Lower McAlpine Greenway 051010 (by Lenny Lampel):
Magicicada tredecassini exuvia, Lower McAlpine Greenway 051010 (by Lenny Lampel)

Magicicada tredecassini exuvia on spicebush, Lower McAlpine Greenway 051010 (by Lenny Lampel):
Magicicada tredecassini exuvia on spicebush, Lower McAlpine Greenway 051010 (by Lenny Lampel)

April 3, 2013

Brood XIX (19) Periodical Cicadas (“locusts”) will emerge in 2024 in Fifteen States

Filed under: Brood XIX | Magicicada | Periodical — Dan @ 1:01 am

Periodical cicada Brood XIX (19) will emerge in the spring of 2024 in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The last time Brood XIX emerged was in 2011.

May 3rd: Brood XIX Magicicada cicadas have begun to emerge. Follow along on the live map on iNaturalist or Cicada Safari Live Map.

Special note: Brood XIII will also emerge in 2024. While the two broods do not overlap, they come closest in the Springfield, Illinois area.

What, when, where, and why:

What:

Millions of these cicadas:
Adult, Nymph, Molting Cicada

  • Cicada insects with a 13-year life cycle.
  • Some people call them “locusts” but they are cicadas. (Locusts are grasshoppers.)
  • Which species: All four 13-year species:
  • NOT the green cicadas that arrive annually.

Brood XIX has a 13-year cycle. It is interesting because it features both Magicicada neotredecim and Magicicada tredecim. These cicadas are very similar in song and appearance, but in areas where they overlap, Magicicada neotredecim alters its song to a higher pitch, which allows female cicadas to determine the species of their prospective mates. Visit Cicadas @ UCONN (formerly Magicicada.org) for more info on this behavior.

M. tredecim also have more orange on their abdomen than M. neotredecim.
Compare 13 year decims

When: Typically beginning in mid-May and ending in late June. These cicadas will begin to emerge approximately when the soil 8 inches beneath the ground reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit. A nice, warm rain will often trigger an emergence.

Other tips: these cicadas will emerge after the trees have grown leaves, and, by my own observation, around the same time Iris flowers bloom.

Where:

View the live maps on iNaturalist.

  1. Alabama counties: Barbour, Bullock, Butler, Calhoun, Chambers, Choctaw, Clarke, Colbert, Crenshaw, Elmore, Etowah, Greene, Lawrence, Limestone, Lowndes, Monroe, Montgomery, Russell, Sumter, Tallapoosa, Wilcox
  2. Alabama cities: Huntsville, Lowndesboro, Talladega
  3. Arkansas counties: Boone, Futon, Howard, Izard, Lawrence, Marion, Montgomery, Pike, Scott, Searcy, Sevier, Sharp, Washington, Yell
  4. Georgia counties: Bibb, Bleckley, Butts, Columbia, Elbert, Greene, Harris, Houston, Jasper, McDuffie, Monroe, Muscogee, Oconee, Peach, Pulaski, Putnam, Richmond, Stephens, Taliaferro, Troup, Waren, Wilkes
  5. Georgia cities: LaGrange, Lincolnton, Rome, Washington.
  6. Illinois counties: Adams, Brown, Calhoun, Cass, Champaign, Clark, Clay, Coles, Cumberland, De Witt, Effingham, Fayette, Ford, Franklin, Gallatin, Hamilton, Hancock, Iroquois, Jefferson, Johnson, Marion, Massac, Morgan, Moultrie, Pike, Pope, Saline, Shelby, Vermillion, Washington, Williamson
  7. Illinois cities: Charleston, Decatur
  8. Kentucky counties: Allen, Caldwell, Christian, Trigg
  9. Louisiana parishes: Caddo, Claiborne, Madison, Morehouse, Ouachita, Washington, Webster. Parish information comes from older literature, and might not be as accurate as recent information.
  10. Maryland counties: St Marys
  11. Missouri counties: Adair, Boone, Callaway, Carter, Clark, Cooper, Dent, iron, Jackson, Knox, Louis, Lincoln, Macon, Maries, Marion, Montgomery, Morgan, Oregon, Osage, Pettis, Phelps, Ralls, Reynolds, St. Carles, St Francois, St Louis
  12. Missouri cities: Columbia, Gerald, Manchester, Pevely, Poplar Bluff, St. Louis, Troy
  13. Mississippi counties: Kemper, Newton
  14. North Carolina counties: Buncombe, Cabarrus, Chatham, Davidson, Davie, Durham, Gaston, Guilford, Mecklenburg, Montgomery, Orange, Randolph, Rowan, Stanly, Union, Wake
  15. North Carolina cities: Apex, Baldwin Township, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Harrisburg, Mebane, New Hill, Pittsboro, Raleigh, Waxhaw
  16. Oklahoma counties: McCurtain
  17. South Carolina counties: Abbeville, Aiken, Anderson, Cherokee, Chester, Edgefield, Greenwood, Lancaster, Lexington, McCormick, Newberry, Oconee, Saluda, Union, York
  18. South Carolina cities: Chester, Little Mountain, Rock Hill, Saluda, Winnsboro
  19. Tennessee counties: Blount, Cheatham, Clay, Davidson, Grundy, Hamilton, Jackson, Loudon, Macon, Marion, McMinn, Meigs, Putnam, Rutherford, Sequatchie, Smith, Stewart, Summer, Williamson
  20. Tennessee cities: Gallatin, Lebanon, Nashville, Spring Hill
  21. Virginia counties: Caroline, Glouchester, Halifax, James City, King and Queen, King William, Middlesex, New Kent, York
  22. Virginia cities: Alexandria, Stafford, Williamsburg

It’s not too late to buy a book!
Gene Kritsky BookCicada OlympicsCecily Cicada

More Location Tips:

Why: Why do they stay underground for 13 years? The prevailing research suggests they’ve evolved a long, 13-year lifecycle allowing them to avoid predators that would sync up with their lifecycle & emergence. Why are there so many?! Research suggests that their huge numbers allow them to overwhelm predators, so enough of them will live on to breed and perpetuate the brood.

More facts and fun:

1907 Map from Marlatt, C.L.. 1907. The periodical cicada. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology.

See a modern map or the Live Map from the Cicada Safari app.
Marlatt 1907 19 Brood XIX

What happened in 2011? Here’s some old blog posts with comments:

What happened in 1998? Here’s our message board from then:

  1. Cicada Mail from June 1998
  2. Cicada Mail from May 1999

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