Cicada Mania

The Cicada Mania Blog: News, Findings, and Discoveries About Cicadas.

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November 20, 2014

A Tibicen cicada breathing

Filed under: Cicada Anatomy,Roy Troutman,Tibicen,Video — by @ 5:31 am

Cicadas breathe through apertures along the side of their body called spiracles. This video of a Tibicen by Roy Troutman shows the opening and closing of a spiracle.

Adult Cicada breathing from Roy Troutman on Vimeo.

November 19, 2014

Which fungus attacks Magicicadas? Massospora cicadina

Filed under: Magicicada — by @ 8:32 pm

The fungus Massospora cicadina preys on Magicicadas cicadas. This is particularly interesting because the fungus is able to prey upon them in spite of their long 17 year life cycle (apparently fungi are not phased by prime numbers).

A photo by Roy Troutman from Brood XIV (2008):

Magicicada with fungus

Two photos by Dan Mozgai from Brood II (2013):

Male Magicicada septendecim infected with Massospora cicadina fungus

Magicicada septendecim with Massosporan fungus found at the Edison Memorial Tower Park in Edison NJ

Magicicada fungus (massospora cicadina)

magicicada fungus (massospora cicadina) from Roy Troutman.

Websites Dedicated to the Cicadas of Europe

Filed under: Croatia,England,France,Slovenia,Spain,Websites — by @ 5:12 pm

This is a selection of links to websites dedicated to the cicadas of Europe.

  1. Songs of European Singing Cicadas. Many images, sound files and text content.
  2. SONGS OF CICADAS from Slovenia and Istria (Croatia) (arnes.si) Many cicada photos, sound files and about six paragraphs of information about the cicadas of Slovenia and Croatia by Prof.dr. Matija Gogala.
  3. La cigale : un insecte vraiment étonnant ! Lots of text content, photos and video of the cicadas of France.
  4. Species Action Plan: New Forest Cicada (Cicadetta montana) (ukbap.org.uk) A photo and about ten paragraphs of information. England.
  5. Welcome to the New Forest Cicada Project. A site devoted to finding the New Forrest Cicada in England.
  6. Cicadas of Spain. There are a lot of photos and video from Spain on Cicada Mania thanks to Iván Jesús Torresano García.

Magicicada cassini calls, chorusing & responses to finger snaps

Filed under: Brood II,Magicicada,Periodical,Sounds,Video — Tags: — by @ 8:00 am

During the Brood II emergence in 2013, Elias Bonaros, Roy Troutman and I spent some time experimenting with coercing male Magicicada to call in response to finger snaps, which mimic the snap of a female cicada’s wings. This trick works fairly well with Magicicada, and can quickly be mastered once you work out the timing. Fingers, wall switches, and the zoom button on my Sony video camera do a good job at mimicking the snap of a females wings.

Magicicada cassini responding to fingersnaps

Magicicada cassini responding to fingersnaps.

I also recorded their calls in terms of decibels to see just how loud they could get. They can get very loud, but not as loud as a rock concert (see this db chart).

Magicicada cassini calling at 109db in Colonia NJ

Magicicada cassini calling at 109db in Colonia NJ.

Magicicada cassini chorusing center peaking at 85db

Magicicada cassini chorusing center peaking at 85db.

Video of Magicicada septendecula from Brood II

Filed under: Brood II,Magicicada,Ovipositing,Periodical,Video — Tags: — by @ 7:45 am

Here are two videos of Magicicada septendecula from Brood II.

Female Magicicada septendecula

Magicicada septendecula.

A female Magicicada septendecula ovipositing

A female Magicicada septendecula ovipositing.

November 16, 2014

Where can I buy cicadas online?

Filed under: FAQs,Websites — by @ 4:28 am

People ask, where can I buy cicadas online?

There are a lot of places, but here are my favorites:

  • Ebay.com. Ebay is a good place to find cicada specimens, particularly if you are just starting your collection. Colorful Asian species dominate the species for sale, but you will usually find American species during or after a periodical cicada emergence (when those are plentiful). Most specimens you’ll find on Ebay are mounted, but you can find unmounted specimens as well.
  • God of Insects. The God of Insects site has been around for a long time. You’ll find mostly Asian species, which are the most collectable because of their beauty.
  • BioQuipBugs. BioQuipBugs has a wide variety of species from a Africa, Asia, North and South America. Their prices are inexpensive. The specimens are also unmounted.
  • CTValley Bio only has one cicada product, but it’s really cool: the Cicada Life Cycle. This mount illustrates the Magicicada lifecycle, and includes an egg, nymph and adult.

Connecticut Valley Biological Supply Company Cicada Life Cycle mount: Connecticut Valley Biological Supply Company Cicada Life Cycle

Search around the web. You might find other shops and different varieties of cicadas not found on the sites mentioned above.

Keep in mind that some species might be over-collected to the point where it could endanger a species. I recommend, for that reason, that people limit their collections and not become too obsessed, as one might who collects toys or comic books.

November 13, 2014

Australian Cicada Names

Filed under: Australia,David Emery — by @ 1:01 am

It’s that time again: time for cicadas in Australia!

Australia has the best cicada names:

  • Cyclochila australasiae
    • Green Grocer
      Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae)
    • Yellow Monday
      rare green yellow Green Grocer
    • Chocolate Soldier
    • Blue Moon
      Blue Moon (Cyclochila australasiae)
    • Masked Devil
      Masked Devil cicada (Cyclochila australasiae)
  • Macrotristria angularis
    • Cherrynose or Whiskey Drinker
      Cherry Nose cicada (Macrotristria angularis)
  • Pauropsalta extrema
  • Lembeja paradoxa
    • Bagpipe Cicada
      Lembeja paradoxa
  • Abricta curvicosta
    • Floury Baker
      Michelle Thompson's Floury Baker (Abricta curvicosta)
  • Anapsaltoda pulchra
    • Golden Emperor
      Anapsaltoda pulchra (Golden Emperor) from Herberton (Queensland) by David Emery.
  • Arenopsaltria fullo
  • Macrotristria godingi
  • Thopha saccata
    • Double Drummer
      Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)
  • Thopha colorata
    • Orange Drummer
      Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata)
  • Arunta perulata
    • White Drummer
      White Drummer cicada (Arunta perulata)
  • Psaltoda plaga
  • Tamasa tristigma
  • Cystosoma saundersii

    • Bladder Cicada
      Cystosoma saundersii (bladder cicada)

    Psaltoda moerens

    • Redeye cicada
      Redeye cicada (Psaltoda moerens)

Use this amazing image by David Emery to identify some of the most well-known Australian cicada species:

Aussie cicadas 1 (3)

Click images for larger versions and the name of the photographer.

Common names of Australian insects.

Also visit L. Popple’s The cicadas of Australia.

Laura Imbruglia sings songs that mention Green Grocers and Yellow Mondays on her album “It Makes a Crunchy Noise”.

November 12, 2014

New Zealand cicada season

Filed under: New Zealand,Websites — by @ 11:25 am

Cicada season in New Zealand begins in November and lasts throughout their Summer months.

The species Maoricicada hamiltoni (Myers, 1926) aka Hamilton’s Cicada, in particular, emerges in November. M. hamiltoni is known for its abundant hair-like setulae (see an image on this page).

Here is a list of the best New Zealand cicada links:

  1. New Zealand Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae): A virtual identification guide (landcareresearch.co.nz) A wonderful web site. Includes a visual identification guide, checklist, and image gallery. Photos of dozens of species.
  2. Cicada Central: New Zealand (uconn.edu) Cicada Central’s New Zealand cicada pages.
  3. Suzy’s World Cicada page (suzy.co.nz) Fun, kid-friendly presentation of cicada information.
  4. An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand (teara.govt.nz) Three paragraphs of information.
  5. Introducing cicadas (teara.govt.nz) Photos, sounds and 4 paragraphs of information.
  6. New Zealand cicadas (troutbum.co.nz)
    Large photos of Kikihia and Amphipsalta.

Here is a nice article about the cicada Sounds of a Kiwi summer:

We have around 40 species of cicada in New Zealand, and probably the most familiar to us is the clapping cicada, which is actually two very closely related species that form the basis of our summer soundtrack in much of the country.

Some cicada New Zealand photos:

November 2, 2014

Brood IV, the Kansan brood, will emerge in 2015

Filed under: Brood IV,Magicicada,Periodical — by @ 1:06 pm

Brood IV, the Kansan brood, will emerge in Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, in the spring of 2015.

The cicada species that will emerge are Magicicada cassinii (Fisher, 1852), Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758), and Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962. These periodical cicadas have a 17-year life cycle. The last time they emerged was 1998.

More to come as we get closer to the spring.

Brood XXIII, the Lower Mississippi Valley brood, will emerge in 2015

Filed under: Brood XXIII,Magicicada,Periodical — by @ 12:38 pm

Brood XXIII, the Lower Mississippi Valley brood, will emerge in Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky, Illinois, and Indiana, in the spring of 2015.

The cicada species that will emerge are Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868); Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000; Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962; and Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962. These periodical cicadas have a 13-year life cycle. The last time they emerged was 2002. According to John Cooley of Magicicada.org, Giant City State Park, Illinois is a good place to observe both M. tredecim and M. neotredecim.

Back in 2002, the emergence began in the last week of April, 2002, and ended the beginning of July. You can read what people said about them back in April, May, and June of 2002.

Here’s where folks reported the cicadas to Cicada Mania in 2002:

Arkansas: Bayou Deview Wildlife Management Area, Poinsett County, Devalls Bluff, Harrisburg, Holland Bottoms, Jacksonville, Jonesboro, Knox Co., Lake Hogue, Lake Poinsett State Park, Little Rock and Wynne.

Illinois: Anna, Carbondale, Carterville, Chester, Clinton Lake, Marissa and Robinson.

Indiana: Harmonie State Park, Hymera, Leanne, Richland, Sullivan And Posey Counties.

Kentucky: Benton, Calvert City, Gilbertsville, Henry County, Murray and Paducah.

Louisiana: Bastrop, Choudrant, Grayson and West Monroe.

Mississippi: Alva, Arlington, Booneville, Brandon, Clinton, Corinth, Desoto County, Florence, French Camp, Hernando, Holcomb, Houlka, Jackson, New Albany, Oxford, Potts Camp, Silver Creek, Tishomingo, and Water Valley.

Tennessee: Atoka, Benton, Cordova, Henry County, Huntingdon, Jackson, Lavinia, Leach, Lexington, McNeary County, Memphis, Paris, Savannah and Speedwell.

Brood XXIII reports from 2002

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