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July 31, 2003

Cicada Comments from July 2003

Filed under: Mail, Comments & Social — Dan @ 10:57 am

Nymf Emergence

Date: Thursday, Jul/31/2003

Message: I’m trying to find out how long it takes for the nymf, once its out and on a tree to emerge. Kids found one hanging on a tree and we would like to get pictures of it coming out. Its been overnite now wondering if this process takes days like a cocoon. — Mike, NJ



3 more Cicada species join annual chorus in Southern Maryland

Date: Wednesday, Jul/30/2003

Message: The first Tibicen linnei of the year was heard in Leonardtown, St. Mary’s County, Maryland on Friday, July 25 at 5:04pm (86 deg). The first Tibicen davisi of the season was heard in Ridge, St. Mary’s County, Maryland on Saturday, July 26 at 2:45pm (86 deg). And last but not least, our largest cicada in MD, Tibicen auletes was also heard on Saturday, July 26 at 8:23pm (81 deg) for the first time this season in Ridge. Everyone is now present and accounted for as far as the cicada fauna of Southern Maryland is concerned. (Even though auletes and davisi are about 4 weeks later than normal.) We currently have 7 species calling: N. hieroglyphica, T. auletes, T. chloromerus, T. davisi, T.linnei, T. lyricen and T. robinsonianus. — John Z, Cicadas of the Mid-Atlantic, Southern Maryland



3 more Cicada species join annual chorus in Southern Maryland

Date: Wednesday, Jul/30/2003

Message: The first Tibicen linnei of the year was heard in Leonardtown, St. Mary’s County, Maryland on Friday, July 25 at 5:04pm (86 deg). The first Tibicen davisi of the season was heard in Ridge, St. Mary’s County, Maryland on Saturday, July 26 at 2:45pm (86 deg). And last but not least, our largest cicada in MD, Tibicen auletes was also heard on Staurday, July 26 at 8:23pm (81 deg) for the first time this season. Everyone is now present and accounted for as far as the cicada fauna of Southern Maryland is concerned. (Even though auletes and davisi are about 4 weeks later than normal.) We currently have 7 species calling: N. hieroglyphica, T. auletes, T. chloromerus, T. davisi, T.linnei, T. lyricen and T. robinsonianus. — John Z, Cicadas of the Mid-Atlantic, Southern Maryland



Cicada Killing Bees

Date: Monday, Jul/28/2003

Message: I have about 200 of them flying around in my yard. They will be here two more weeks. — Donna, LaCrosse, Wi



Live Giant Cicada

Date: Monday, Jul/28/2003

Message: Just found one today, 28 July 03 — James, Charleston, South Carolina

i was wondering

Date: Friday, Jul/25/2003

Message: are there Cicada’s in michigan..?
and if so do they build nest under the ground..?
at my boyfriends house out by there one barn (he lives on a farm) there are bricks ont he ground by the service door and there are id say about 20-25 hold in the ground and large bee looking bugs coming in and out of them mvoing dirt and such..! they look sorta like the pictures i’ve seen of the Cicada’s/..? if not would anyone know of another bee/bug that looks like the Cicada does..? thanks for any help…
michelle
chellibelli20 [AT] comcast.com — michelle, flint,mi,



Cicada Killing Bees

Date: Thursday, Jul/24/2003

Message: Hi!
CKB’s have been visiting my yard since July of 1998. They are big, here by the hundreds, non agressive, dig holes, swarm in the heat of the day and leave in mid August.I have seen them carrying a Cicada bigger than they are and dragging it into the hole the bee has prepared. They are fasinating to watch. It is amazing how they have stayed in my yard and not gone into my neighbors yard,(for which they are grateful) even where the land come together and there is nothing to stop them from going there. I guess I am the choosen one!!!When they first appeared, I was frightened of them and knew nothing about them. I had them treated by a Professional exterminator which cost $150 and it did not faze them.The only down side, besides scaring the daylights out of those who do not know about them, is the dirt piles they leave, that become bare spots in my lawn. Areas where they have dug before, seen to have recovered nicely though.Anyone wanting info, may contact me at: MadonnaMa [AT] aol.comDonna — Donna, La Crosse, Wisconsin



First Day of Abundance for Tibicen chloromerus in Southern Maryland

Date: Tuesday, Jul/22/2003

Message: Even though T. chloromerus and lyricen have been calling sporadically since July 5, it wasn’t until today they hit there normal calling peak. Driving to work this morning, I heard numerous T. chloromerus calling from the trees that lined the road for the first time this season. This event I call the First Day of Abundance usually occurs on or near the 4th of July! So, the cicadas still seem to be stuck in a three week time warp. Tibicen davisi, linnei and auletes have yet to begin calling! However Neocicada hieroglyphica has been more abundant this year and been heard calling from more localities than in the previous 8 years of recording cicada calls in this area. T. robinsonianus has begun calling in a few localities, but is not common. — John Z, Cicadas of the Mid-Atlantic, Southern Maryland



Donating blood to capture Neocicadas

Date: Tuesday, Jul/22/2003

Message: Last Sunday, Wil Hersberger and his wife Donna, came down to Southern Maryland to get a photo of a live Neocicada hieroglyphica for a book project Wil is working on. For the past 8 years, a local population has been regularly calling near where I live. The only Neocicada I have ever been able to capture however, involved falling from the tree it was in and scrapping my leg in the process. I did capture him even though one of his wings was damaged. So when Wil asked to come down to capture a live Neocicada to photograph, I wasn’t quite sure we would have any luck. Needless to say, the local population picked this year to stop calling! Luckily, 2 days before Wil arrived I began to hear loud choruses of Neocicada on a local navy base. We decided to try this site first. The Neocicada were very abundant, but seemed to be calling from high up in the trees. Chestnut Oak seemed to be the dominant tree species in each woodlot we heard the cicadas. Luckily we captured our first male on a small black cherry tree about 10 feet off the ground. We noticed that when the Neocicada choruses get going, they seem to pulsate as a group in a strange sounding chorus. We also observed that the captured male acted more like a horsefly than a cicada as it flew around in its cage. They also seemed to be calling everywhere, but were very hard to actually locate. Each male that was low enough for us to attempt to catch, seemed to evade capture at the last second. We tried a second site, and out of sheer luck I threw my insect net up about 20 feet along the side of a chestnut oak and it hit the tree 6 inches above a calling male! He flew straight into the net as it fell to the ground, screaming all the way down. I couldn’t believe our luck! I think Wil was as shocked as I was! We were getting a little frustrated at our luck up to this point. Our third capture involved the blood shedding. As I climbed to attempt to capture our third calling male, I actually grabbed it with my bare hands out of frustration (too many branches prevented the use of a net), just before I fell down from the tree, scrapping my leg in the process! So there I stood, bleeding but elated that I had captured another Neocicada! I just wanted to relate that story, because most of the other species of annual cicadas come quite easily to lights, but Neocicada has been quite a challenge to capture. Wil took some great shots of the 3 males and you can view one of them at www.natureimagesandsounds.com/NH.html. I just wanted everyone to know there was a story behind that picture! — John Z, Mid-Atlantic Cicadas, Southern Maryland



bugs

Date: Tuesday, Jul/22/2003

Message: One of my favorite bugs as a kid, I always look forward to their song in the summer. This seems to be a good year.
The photos are great. I’ve never seen pictures of multiples marching along!
20 some years ago, when I was in an old-time band, we played at some festival in Ohio (?) where there were thousands in the woods. The chorus was so loud and they would land on you as you walked around. It was like the best of childhood – except I was an adult and the ‘girls’ were more interesting… and interested! But somehow, they still weren’t impressed when you had a bug on your shirt. sigh
Thanks for the great site — jd, atlanta



Do cicadas bite?

Date: Sunday, Jul/20/2003

Message: I had a dark tree leaf green cicada land on my shorts (which were the same color), I showed my dad the two almost fang-like holes in my thigh. I didn’t think that they bite. Maybe it was a spider. This particular cicada was about 1.3 inches and it wasn’t moving very fast. It was scary.7-20-93 — christian, Chicago



!!!!!!——–HELP!——–!!!!!!

Date: Friday, Jul/18/2003

Message: Does anyone know where I can find pictures really good pictures of cicadas with their wings spread open? I am trying to find more cicada photos like the ones found at www.thais.it/entomologia/I can’t find good photots on a solid white background.
Does anyone have any advice for websites?
thanks,
V.
**** My email address: valenniansky [AT] hotmail.com **** — Valennia, NYC



!!!!!!——–HELP!——–!!!!!!

Date: Friday, Jul/18/2003

Message: Does anyone know where I can find pictures really good pictures of cicadas with their wings spread open? I am trying to find more cicada photos like the ones found at www.thais.it/entomologia/I can’t find good photots on a solid white background.
Does anyone have any advice for websites?
thanks,
V. — Valennia, NYC



N. Calif. cicada

Date: Tuesday, Jul/15/2003

Message: Re my previous message: I have measured another cicada here and it has a 1″ black body with touches of orange, and 1″ wings. The mark on its back is an half-circle of 4 orange dots. Its eyes are dark gray-green. -G — G, Alturas, Modoc Co., Calif.



Cicada Sighting

Date: Monday, Jul/14/2003

Message: Heard the cicadas in the trees the last few days. Finally saw one today on a hammock on our porch. Never saw any emerging from the ground.My last sighting of cicadas – 1968 at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona. Thousands. — John Dagg, Newhall, California



N. Calif. cicadas

Date: Monday, Jul/14/2003

Message: Site: Alturas, in Modoc Co., Calif. (close to Oreg. and Nev.) I grew up in Austin, Tex. with cicadas lulling every summer away with their rising-falling chorus as background music. We would see a few shells, see only a few adults. Same here in N. California. They’ve been singing for several weeks. And making very damaging slits (for eggs) in many new branches of our young apple, pear, cherry, and aspen trees. Cicadas, like so many things, are best if they remain in the background. But what can we do, we’re all in this life together. I would like to know the name of “our” Tibicen cicadas here. The ones I’ve seen have black eyes and black bodies with touches of orange (thin stripe across the back, and on some joints.) The one I measured had a body 3/4″ long, and wings 3/4″ long. Thanks, -G — G, Alturas, Modoc Co., CA



A big thanks to John Zyla

Date: Monday, Jul/14/2003

Message: This past weekend John was kind enough to lead me around to find some Neocicada hieroglyphicas. We were successful in capturing a few so that I could get some nice photos of a book project. John was great and I am certain that he will post a log of the days events :)
Please check out the photo of N. hieroglyphica here:
[url]http://www.natureimagesandsounds.com/NH.html[/url]
— Wil Hershberger, Hedgesville, WV



Re:Cicadas in Fields? Next year’s brood X during our wedding.

Date: Monday, Jul/14/2003

Message: Mike,
If the field was wooded 17 years ago, or there are wooded areas near by, you might have unexpected guests. Good luck,
Wil — Wil Hershberger, Hedgesville, WV



Need help identifying if this prehistoric looking creature is a cicada?

Date: Wednesday, Jul/9/2003

Message: We found a dying ‘creature’ outside that many of my friends have identified as cicada. We are currently experiencing flood levels and are wondering if he was carried in by the storms. I have yet to find a picture of it on the web. It is approximately 4.5 inches long and resembles cicada with the body,legs,wings, and eyes, and has some mean looking mandibles. Anyone want to view a picture of it, please email me. mmjjdd [AT] email.com. Thanks. — MD, Sidney, Ohio



Strange Creature in the Ground!!!

Date: Wednesday, Jul/9/2003

Message: The other day my kids saw a 1/2″ to 1″ hole in the ground outside our apartment. My daughter saw what she thought was a worm inside the hole. I told her to leave it alone because we didn’t know what it was. The next day we knew it was not a worm. The ‘creature’ was near the top of the hole & I could see what looked like a beak & a beady eye looking out, & two ‘hooks’ with ‘claws’ under the ‘beak’ and eye. It looked strange, and we (our neighbor & I) didn’t know what it was. A braver child from the complex dug it up & we saw that it had a shell like an armadillo (sp). I remembered seeing a shell like that on an episode of CSI & that it could be a cicada. It didn’t make it, though; it died. After spotting that, I did some research & learned more about the cicada. Since that hole appeared (about 2 weeks ago) we have found about 7 more holes. I do not remember seeing these holes or cicada shells (we found one of those this morning) the last four years we have been here, & I see that the next brood is not supposed to be around here (Kentucky) until next year. Is it likely that there can be that many “pioneers” the year before? And aren’t they emerging late in the season? (We have had a very very wet spring this year – near-record; & now it is very very dry…). Just curious! cecilre [AT] yahoo.com — Becky Cecil, Lexington, Kentucky



Annual Cicada season in Southern Maryland off to a slow start

Date: Wednesday, Jul/9/2003

Message: Although Tibicen chloromerus (Morning Cicada) and Tibicen lyricen (Lyric Cicada) both began calling on July 4th, (their latest start in 8 years) they are still sporadic and haven’t begun their normal abundant calling yet. T. chloromerus is calling sporadically during the morning hours, N. hieroglyphica is still calling during the mid-day into evening and T. lyricen finishes out by calling near dusk. Tibicen davisi, linnei and robinsonianus have not been heard so far this season in Southern Maryland. — John Z, Cicadas of the Mid-Atlantic, Southern Maryland



Cicadas in Fields? Next year’s brood X during our wedding.

Date: Tuesday, Jul/8/2003

Message: My fiancee is concerned about our outdoor wedding next year on May 30th. It’s about 30 miles north of Baltimore. From what I’ve read on the boards here, that will be right in the middle of Brood X’s next coming out party. Cicada’s typically come out in the woods, correct? So if our reception is in a field (near the water), we shouldn’t have a large amount, right? Any help would be appreciated. — Mike, Bel Air, MD



Followup on early emergence in Chicago

Date: Monday, Jul/7/2003

Message: Early last month I saw hundreds (perhaps thousands) emerge from my yard and the immediate vicinity over a 2 week period. I saw birds get most of them every morning. Apparently, they got all of them or something else did because I never heard any singing in the trees and I don’t see any mature ones anywhere now. Strange. — Ken, La Grange, IL



Cicada singing today, never heard here before

Date: Sunday, Jul/6/2003

Message: I grew up in Phoenix AZ and know what a Cicada sounds like so when I heard one today in my Dogwood in Portland Oregon I was mystified. Not only did I hear it I walked right up to the tree and could see it. Too high to grab and photo but I could clearly see it. I have lived here eighteen years and have never heard Cicadas before. I thought I heard one last year but decided I was crazy. — LeeAnne, Portland Oregon



To Michael and his Mom

Date: Friday, Jul/4/2003

Message: We only heard the cicadas singing for about a week maybe a week and a half. I haven’t heard any for a while now. I think the birds feasted on them until they were gone. We had flocks of seagulls all over our neighborhood that came just to eat them. When they couldn’t find them on the ground they would fly and brush the branches of the trees with their wings to knock some out of the trees. It was fascinating to watch. The seagulls are gone now. As far as I know we have not had any mosquito spraying in our village. — Sue, Flossmoor, IL



Southern Maryland Annual Cicada Season Starts, Sort Of…

Date: Thursday, Jul/3/2003

Message: The first annual cicada for the season was heard last Saturday, June 28 in Saint Mary’s County, Maryland. A male Neocicada heiroglyphica, a “July Screamer” was heard calling at 11:36am in Hollywood, MD (it was 76 degrees). This is almost 3 weeks later than normal over the last few years. As of today, July 3 no Tibicen chloromerus, davisi or lyricen has been heard yet. This is the latest in the season for the last eight years for all three species. This is two weeks later than normal so far… — John Z, Cicadas of the Mid-Atlantic, Southern Maryland



Early June Emergence

Date: Thursday, Jul/3/2003

Message: My Son and I had the joy of seeing many cicadas early this last June. We brought some indoors and stayed up till 1am watching them transform. In the morning we let them go. A few of them could not seem to fully pull them out of their shell. Since I knew they would die anyway, we fed them to our lizard. One seemed perfectly fine but the wings never unfurled and hardened all curled up. The rest were all healthy and happy and sent on their way. We had a great time and found ALOT. The best time was right after sundown. You could walk down the sidewalk and see them cross the sidewalk, heading for a tree. Many climbed into my sons fort and up our shed wall. The weird thing is, it is now early July. I have not yet heard any “singing”, and we thought we would have by now, especially since we saw so many. Could the mosquito spraying our city has been doing effected them? — Michael and his Mom, Lombard, IL



Cicada sightings, or should I say, soundings.

Date: Wednesday, Jul/2/2003

Message: Hi,Just recently I have been hearing and seeing a number of cicadas in my neighborhood. I don’t recall having ever seen them in this area and I’ve been living here since 1961. Are they indigenous to the region, freshly introduced, and/or of a transient nature. I wasn’t sure about them so I caught one in a jar. I figured if it was the beginnning of a stoppable plague, why not stop it. Now that I see that these are not the only ones and that they’ve been seen here before, I’ll let him go.BW — Brian W, West San Fernando Valley, CA



Never seen before

Date: Wednesday, Jul/2/2003

Message: My husband and I live in las vegas Nevead and saw this thing on our patio. We had no idea what it was. So we got on the net to find out what it is. Where do they come from and does it migrate. We have never seen nor heard of this thing. Please let us know. — chezerrae kaiser, Las vegas, NV


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