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March 21, 2015

Better IDs for E.A. Seguy Cicada Illustrations

The NCSU Libraries Rare and Unique Digital Collections website recently reminded the us of artist Eugene Alain (E.A.) Seguy’s insect illustrations. Seguy created these illustrations in the 1920’s, and as you might imagine, some of the cicada names cited in the notes for these illustrations have changed. Names typically change when cicadas are reclassified due to discoveries about their biology, or when we realize that someone else had actually named them earlier than the namer currently given credit.

Here are the two illustrations, the accompanying identification, and corrected identifications.


EA Seguy Cicada Art

Accompanying identification:

1. Tacua speciosa. Indes; 2. Polyneura ducalis. Indes Or.; 3. Cicada saccata. Australie; 4. Cicada fascialis. Siam; 5. Tozena melanoptera. Indes Or.

Corrected or expanded identification:

  1. Tacua speciosa. This is correct, although there are two subspecies of T. speciosa, I’m going to guess it is Tacua speciosa speciosa (Illiger, 1800) based on the location.
  2. Polyneura ducalis. This is correct. Polyneura ducalis Westwood, 1840.
  3. Cicada saccata. This is now: Thopha saccata (Fabricius, 1803).
  4. Cicada fascialis. This is now: Cryptotympana facialis facialis (Walker, 1858). Update: David Emery says this might be a Cryptotympana acuta (Signoret, 1849).
  5. Tozena melanoptera. Close enough. Tosena melanoptera melanoptera (White, 1846). There are a few unnamed subspecies.


EA Seguy Cicada Art

Accompanying identification:

1. Goeana festiva. Indes; 2. Zammara tympanum. Amérique du Sud; 3. Goeana ochracea. Indes; 4. Phenax variegata. Brésil; 5. Hemisciera maculipennis. Amazone

Corrected or expanded identification:

  1. Goeana festiva is actually Callogaeana festiva festiva (Fabricius, 1803).
  2. Zammara tympanum. This is correct. Zammara tympanum (Fabricius, 1803).
  3. Goeana ochracea is way off. It is a Tailanga binghami Distant, 1890.
  4. Phenax variegata is not a cicada, is it a fulgoroid planthopper, but the id is correct.
  5. Hemisciera maculipennis is correct. Hemisciera maculipennis (de Laporte, 1832) aka the “Stop and Go” cicada, because its colors resemble the colors of a stop light.

December 24, 2013

Photos of Cicadas from Australia

Filed under: Australia,Cyclochila australasiae,Pauropsalta,Thopha — Tags: — Dan @ 12:53 pm

Kees Green sent us many photos of cicadas taken in Australia.

Here is a sample:

A Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae) nymph:

Green Grocer Cyclochila australasiae  nymph by Kees Green

An unidentified Pauropsalta sp.:

Pauropsalta sp by Kees Green 02

A Thopha sessilibia:

Thopha sessilibia by Kees Green 02

See all of Kees’ photos, including a Tamasa tristigma and an aggregation of Macrotristria goding.

December 3, 2007

Orange Drummer cicadas

Filed under: Australia,Thopha — Tags: — Dan @ 12:53 pm

More Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata) photos from Jodi!

Orange Drummer

Orange Drummer

December 1, 2007

Ozzie Cicadas: Emerging Thopha

Filed under: Australia,David Emery,Thopha — Dan @ 12:09 pm

Here are some emerging Thopha, Thopha saccata a.k.a. Double Drummer (I think — not 100% sure), taken by David Emery.

Double Drummer

November 25, 2007

More cicada photos from Australia

More Australian cicada photos from Kevin Lee. Quotes by Kevin.

Click the images for a larger (3072 x 2304) version:

This is a double drummer who got stuck whilst emerging so he never got to fly and sing.. but he still saw the light of day and was in the room with the other cicadas and had a bit of company. But if I had left it on the tree he would have been eaten alive by ants.

double drummer

Green Grocer:

Green Grocer

Green Grocers:

Green Grocers

Amongst young Aussie kids the legendary White Knight is believed to exist but it is really just a black prince. When cicadas such as double drummers and black princes first emerge they appear white and gradually they develop their distinctive pigmentation. This is the before and after shots of the same cicada.

White Knight

See all of Kevin Lee’s cicada photos.

November 20, 2007

Cicada photos from Australia

I’m happy to announce that we received our first Australian cicada photos of this season!!! The photos were taken by Kevin Lee, Australia’s biggest cicada maniac.

According to Kevin:

This is the season for cicadas and this year they are more proliferating that usual. Some would call it a plague but I love it.

The birds (kookaburras and magpies) are having a feast!

Click the images for a larger (3072 x 2304) version:

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata):

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)

The Double Drummer can be found in parts of eastern Queensland and Eastern NSW, from November to early March. (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p.55)

rare green yellow Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae) and others:

Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae)

rare green yellow Green Grocer:

Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae)

Cyclochila australasiae can be found in eastern Queensland, NSW and Victoria, and most emerge in October and November (Moulds, M.S.. Australian Cicadas Kennsignton: New South Wales Press, 1990, p. 61.).

More: Previous posts about Australia’s cicadas.

See all of Kevin’s cicada photos.