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May 26, 2014

Tibicen superbus videos

Filed under: Tibicen,Video — Tags: — Dan @ 9:40 am

YouTube has lots of videos of cicadas. Here is a playlist of one of the prettiest North American cicadas, Tibicen superbus:

Tibicen superbus, aka the Superb Cicada, can be found in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

January 1, 2014

North American Cicada Websites

Filed under: Canada,Diceroprocta,Platypedia,Tibicen,United States,Websites — Dan @ 10:58 am

These sites contain information about both periodical and annual cicada species:

  1. Visit Tim McNary’s Bibliography of the Cicadoidea for many, many cicada papers and articles.
  2. Insect Singers. A new site from David Marshall and Kathy Hill featuring dozens of cicada song samples from North America.AUDIO PHOTOS
  3. Cicada
    ( One of the premier cicada sites. Many pictures, maps and information. Superb Magicicada information. PHOTOS MAPS
  4. Singing Insects of North America ( A large site featuring lists of North American species and audio files. PHOTOS AUDIO
  5. Bug Guide ( A massive site devoted insect identification, including an abundance of cicada photos and information. You’ll find Cacama, Diceroprocta, Magicicada (Periodical Cicadas), Neocicada, Neoplatypedia, Okanagana, Pacarina, Platypedia, Tibicen, Beameria and Okanagodes. PHOTOS
  6. Massachusetts Cicadas ( tremendous cicada site packed with information
    and photos. Dozens of pages of information. Tibicens, Magicicada, Cicada Killer wasps. PHOTOS
  7. Gene Kritsky’s Web Site ( Gene Kritsky is one of the worlds foremost cicada researchers. Book him for your next cicada event.
  8. Cicadas of the Mid-Atlantic ( Sighting information for Magicicada and annual cicadas in the Mid-Atlantic region. Yearly cicada reports are available. PHOTOS
  9. Cicada
    ( Lots of information and photos. Cicada Hunt is a great site for families interested in cicada hunting and study. PHOTOS
  10. Checklist of Cicadas of Kansas ( A list of species you’ll find in Kansas, references, photos and illustrations. PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONS
  11. Guide
    d’identification d’insectes du Quebec
    ( En Francais. Canicularis and Okanagana rimosa info and photos. PHOTOS AUDIO
  12. Professor Paul S. Boyer’s Cicada page ( Features Magicicada photos, information and audio files. ILLUSTRATIONS AUDIO
  13. Homoptera: cicadas, hoppers, & aphids ( Information about the Homoptera order, photos and illustrations. PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONS
  14. Insect Images ( About 150 North American cicada photos, including Magicicada, Tibicen, Okanagana, and Cacama. PHOTOS
  15. Gordon’s Cicada Page ( A photo and about 10 printed pages worth of solid cicada information. PHOTOS
  16. The University of Michigan Cicada Pages ( The premier North America cicada site, until Cicada Central and came around. Magicicada, Tibicen, Okanagana, Diceroprocta. PHOTOS AUDIO MAPS


  1. is devoted to monitoring emergences and providing Magicicada information. AUDIO PHOTOS MAPS
  2. Periodical Cicada (
    A few photos. PHOTOS
  3. Periodical Cicada ( Many nice photos depicting the cicada’s life cycle, and good information. PHOTOS
  4. Periodical Cicadas ( A fun and informative periodical cicada page with many excellent photos, recipes and 19 paragraphs of information. PHOTOS
  5. Return of the Cicada! Serious information mixed with humor and silly illustrations. ( PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONS
  6. Seventeen Year Cicada ( Dozens of Magicicada photos and info. PHOTOS


  1. Annual Cicadas of Arkansas ( Photos and information about Tibicen robinsonianus (formerly T. robinsoniana), Tibicen dorsatus (formerly T. dorsata), Tibicen pruinosus (formerly T. pruinosa), Tibicen lyricen, Tibicen davisi, Tibicen auletes, & Tibicen aurifera. PHOTOS


  1. Apache cicada, Diceroprocta apache ( A photo and 3 paragraphs of information. PHOTOS
  2. This page features a summary of the Diceroprocta species


  1. Colorado State Univerity Extension cicada
    ( Includes a picture of Putnam’s cicada and a paragraph of information within 3 pages of various information about cicadas. PHOTOS

November 7, 2013

New Species of Tibicen: Tibicen neomexicensis

Filed under: Tibicen — Tags: — Dan @ 6:19 am

A new species of Tibicen cicada, Tibicen neomexicensis, has been described by Brian J. Stucky.

Read more about Morphology, bioacoustics, and ecology of Tibicen neomexicensis sp. n., a new species of cicada from the Sacramento Mountains in New Mexico, U.S.A. (Hemiptera, Cicadidae, Tibicen).

Thanks to David Marshall for the tip.

August 9, 2013

August is a great time to look for Tibicen cicadas in North America

Filed under: Canada,Tibicen,United States,Video — Tags: — Dan @ 9:33 am

Now is a great time to look and listen for Tibicen cicadas in North America. Tibicen are the medium to large sized annual cicadas. Typically they are well camouflaged – with colors like black, white, green & brown.

During the day you can listen for them, of course, and spot them that way. Try Insect Singers for cicada songs. You can also look for their exuvia (skins), and if you’re lucky you can catch on on a low branch.

Last night I started looking around 10pm and found three Swamp Cicadas (T. tibicen tibicen) shedding their skins on trees around the yard. I also collected about 30 exuvia (skins). All in a quarter acre yard. Take a look at this video:

Swamp Cicada shedding its nymphal skin from Cicada Mania on Vimeo.

Swamp Cicada

Teneral Swamp Cicada

July 30, 2013

Tibicen auletes in Manchester, NJ

Filed under: Tibicen,Video — Tags: — Dan @ 8:44 pm

Last night I went on an exploration of Manchester, NJ looking for Tibicen auletes (Germar, 1834) with Elias Bonaros and his friend Annette.

T. auletes, are known as the Northern Dusk Singing Cicada. As their name suggests, T. auletes calls at dusk, around sunset. Their call is amazing – visit Insect Singers to hear their call.

Luckily I found a (deceased) female and an exuvia (nymph skin). Elias and Annette found many exuvia and a live nymph. We were able to watch the nymph undergo ecdysis (leave its exuvia, and expand its adult body).

Here are some images of the cicadas we found last night (click the first two images to get to larger versions):

Tibicen auletes female Manchester NJ

Tibicen auletes female Manchester NJ ventral

Tibicen auletes nymph Manchester NJ

Some (blurry) video:

Dan and Elias netting a T. auletes exuvia. Photo by Annette DeGiovine-Oliveira:

Dan and Elias Lakewood New Jersey_7-29-13 by Annette DeGiovine-Oliveira

April 9, 2013

Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico

Download the PDF here:

We are excited to announce the availability of a document by Allen F. Sanborn and Polly K. Phillips titled Biogeography of the Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of North America, North of Mexico. This document features distribution maps for North American cicada species! This document is an excellent companion to The Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea: Cicadidae) of North America North of Mexico by Allen F. Sanborn and Maxine S. Heath (link to that book).

Abstract: We describe and illustrate the biogeography of the cicadas inhabiting continental North America, north of Mexico. Species distributions were determined through our collecting efforts as well as label data from more than 110 institutional collections. The status of subspecies is discussed with respect to their distributions. As we have shown over limited geographic areas, the distribution of individual species is related to the habitat in which they are found. We discuss the biogeography of the genera with respect to their phylogenetic relationships. California is the state with the greatest alpha diversity (89 species, 46.6% of taxa) and unique species (35 species, 18.3% of taxa). Texas, Arizona, Colorado and Utah are the states with the next greatest alpha diversity with Texas, Arizona and Utah being next for unique species diversity. Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island are the states with the least amount of cicada diversity. Diversity is greatest in states and areas where there is a diversity of plant communities and habitats within these communities. Mountainous terrain also coincides with increases in diversity. Several regions of the focus area require additional collection efforts to fill in the distributions of several species.
Keywords: cicada; distribution; Diceroprocta; Tibicen; Okanagana; Okanagodes; Cacama; Magicicada; Platypedia; Cicadetta

An example of a map from the document:

Example Map

January 15, 2013

Tibicen or Lyristes

Filed under: Lyristes,Tibicen — Dan @ 8:50 pm

A Tibicen by any other name would still sound as sweet…

I always wondered why Lyristes plebejus is also called Tibicen plebejus.

It seems that there is a dispute as to whether the genus Tibicen should actually be called Lyristes. A petition was made (back in the 1980s) to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, to change Tibicen to Lyristes. I learned this from the wonderful new book, The Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea: Cicadidae) of North America North of Mexico by Allen F. Sanborn and Maxine S. Heath (order it). I checked the ICZN website, and the petition appears to fallen off their docket of open cases. I also noticed that on European and Japanese websites, they use Lyristes.

I personally hope the genus name doesn’t change for North American species — I would have to make a lot of changes on this website. Going through the name change from Tibicen chloromera to Tibicen chloromerus to Tibicen tibcen, was bad enough.

The root of the word Tibicen is flute player, and the root of the word Lyristes is lyre — both referring to musical instruments. (Frankly I think most Tibicen sound like power tools — I don’t know Latin for Black & Decker).

BTW, this is a Lyristes plebejus (from Spain):

Freshly emerged male Tibicen/Lyristes plebejus

And this is a Lyristes flammatus (from Japan):

Tibicen flammatus

And some day, this might be a Lyristes auletes (from North Carolina):

Tibicen auletes

November 12, 2012

A large smashed Tibicen auletes

Filed under: Tibicen — Dan @ 9:57 pm

Even smashed, cicadas can be interesting. Found in Baltimore, MD.

Smashed Auletes

View the BIG version of the image to see the details.

It was a male Tibicen auletes. Thanks to Elias Bonaros for the ID.

August 13, 2012

A Tibicen tibicen (chloromera) singing

Filed under: Annual,Tibicen,Video — Tags: — Dan @ 7:41 am

The trees near where I work are chocked full of Tibicen tibicen cicadas (formerly known as T. chloromera, also known as Swamp cicadas).

Here is a short video featuring the call of a Tibicen tibicen that I recorded this morning:

Here’s a sound file of the cicada’s song…

August 12, 2012

Tibicen canicularis – Dog Star Rising

Filed under: Annual,Tibicen — Tags: , — Dan @ 9:34 am

Mid-August is approaching, and the “Dog Days” of summer are almost here. Sirius (the Dog Star) and the constellation Canis Major will soon begin to appear in the early morning sky. Now is also the time that Tibicen canicularis, the Dog Day Day cicada, is also making its presence known in the U.S.A.

This is a photo of a T. canicularis (Dog Day cicada) next to a T. davisi (Southern Dog Day cicada) by by Paul Krombholz:

T. canicularis looks quite different from T. davisi

T. canicularis has a green pronotal collar, green markings on its pronotum, and at least some, if not all, orange colors on its mesonotum (where the M is on the cicada’s back). T. canicularis sounds like (to me at least) a circular saw buzzing through a plank in wood in a neighbor’s garage.

Imagine that you are a farmer waking just before dawn and seeing the first signs of Sirius, the Dog Star, and then later in the day, hearing T. canicularis singing away in the trees surrounding your fields. Those two signs are signals that summer is reaching its peak, and harvest will start soon enough.

T. canicularis can be found in the following states and provinces: AR, CT, DC, IL, IN, IA, KS, ME, MB, MD, MA, MI, MN, MO, NE, NB, NH, NJ, NY, NC, ND, NS, OH, ON, PA, PE, QC, RI, SC, SD, TN, VT, VA, WV, WI.

Here is a screen capture of the computer app Stellarium, with Canis Major and Sirius rising above the horizon before dawn.

Sirius rising

If you’re interested in stars, check out Stellarium. It is free.

Visit the Songs of Insects site for a nice photo and sound file of the Dog Day cicada. Also by their book Songs of Insects – is is inexpensive and comes with a CD.

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