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June 17, 2013

Jean-Francois Duval’s Cicada Photos from Connecticut

Jean-Francois Duval of Victoriaville, Québec wrote me back on April 15th looking for advice for where and when to observe the 2013 Brood II emergence. Where is easier than when. I recommended a park in Connecticut (closest state to Victoriaville, Québec) that is known to have Brood II cicadas. When was more difficult this year because of a cold and rainy spring; cold and rain delay emergences or make them difficult to appreaciate.

I’m happy to say Jean-Francois made it to Connecticut at the right time to see the cicadas. Here is a selection of his photos.

Click each image to see a larger version:

Exuvia on a tree in Connecticut by Jean-Francois Duval

Magicicada exuvia in Connecticut by Jean-Francois Duval

Magicicada septendecim in Connecticut by Jean-Francois Duval

Teneral Magicicada and exuvia in Connecticut by Jean-Francois Duval

Teneral Magicicada in Connecticut by Jean-Francois Duval

Adult Magicicada and cicada with failed ecdysis in Connecticut by Jean-Francois Duval

Cicada emergence holes in Connecticut by Jean-Francois Duval

June 8, 2013

Roy Troutman’s 2013 Brood II cicada photos

When Roy Troutman visited New Jersey last week he took a lot of great cicada photos. Here is a sample of the best.

Click these photos to see larger versions of the photos:

This first photo is particularly interesting, because you can see the Magicicada cassini in flight between their calls:

Magicicada cassini flying inbetween calling in Colonia NJ by Roy Troutman

Magicicada nymph:

Cicada Nymph by Roy Troutman

Magicicada undergoing ecdysis:

Magicicada undergoing ecdysis by Roy Troutman

M. septendecim:

M septendecim by Roy Troutman 2

Teneral Magicicada:

Teneral Magicada by Roy Troutman

Mustard-colored eyes:

Mustard eyed Magicicada septendecim by Roy Troutman

Magicicada with exuvia:

Magicicada with Exuvia by Roy Troutman

Magicicada mating:

Magicicada mating by Roy Troutman

Magicicada exuvia and corpses:

Magicicada corpses and exuvia by Roy Troutman

Magicicada staring at you:

Magicicada staring at you by Roy Troutman

Magicicada mating:

Magicicada septendecim mating by Roy Troutman

View all of Roy Troutman’s 2013 Brood II photos.

Brood II Magicicada photos from Montclair, NJ

Enjoy these photos of Brood II Magicicada from Montclair, NJ by Claudine Ohayon.

Click each image thumbnail for larger versions:

Adult Magicicada:

Magicicada in Montclair NJ by Claudine Ohayon

Mating Magicicada:

Mating Magicicada in Montclair NJ by Claudine Ohayon

Magicicada corpses and exuvia:

Magicicada exuvia and corpses in Montclair NJ by Claudine Ohayon

Teneral Magicicada (gray phase) near exuvia (shells):

Magicicada exuvia and adults in Montclair NJ by Claudine Ohayon

Emergence holes:

Magicicada exit holes in Montclair NJ by Claudine Ohayon

For more photos visit Your 2013 Brood II Cicada Photos gallery.

Brood II Magicicada photos from Scotch Plains, NJ

Enjoy these Brood II Magicicada photos from Scotch Plans, NJ from Judy Lanfredi.

Click each thumbnail image for larger versions.

Teneral Magicicada on a flower. Notice the cicada is gray in color, between the white and final black:

Teneral Magicicada on a flower in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi

Teneral Magicicada and exuvia (shell):

Teneral Magicicada and exuvia  in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi

Teneral Magicicada:

Teneral Magicicada in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi

Mating Magicicada septendecim:

Mating Magicicada septendecim in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi 2

Mating Magicicada septendecim:

Mating Magicicada septendecim in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi

Magicicada on an iris flower:

Magicicada on an iris flower in Scotch Plains by Judy Lanfredi

For more photos by Judy, visit Comments (1)

May 19, 2013

Tips for photographing adult Magicicadas for identification purposes

When photographing adult Magicicadas, particularly if you are interested in identifying their species and gender, it is important to photograph them from multiple angles: ventral (bottom) and lateral (left or right) particularly near the head. Please take photos of the dorsal (top), anterior (front), posterior (hind) and other angles, however ventral and left or right are the best sides to help identify the species.

We also encourage you to clean your fingernails and include an item which can be used to determine the size of the insect, like a ruler.

The ventral view allows us to determine the species and sex.

The following photo features a male (left) and female (right) Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus, 1758). Note the orange striped abdomen, characteristic of the M. septendecim. Also, as with other cicada species, note that the female’s abdomen comes to a point, and the male’s abdomen is thicker and ends with a “blocky-shaped” structure.
Magicicada septendecula male and female by Osamu Hikino

The following photo features a female (left) and male (right) Magicicada cassini (Fisher, 1851). Note the lack of distinct orange stripes on the abdomen, characteristic of the M. cassini. Their abdomens are nearly completely black. Also note that the female’s abdomen comes to a point, and the male’s abdomen is thicker and ends with a “blocky-shaped” structure.
Magicicada cassini male and female by Osamu Hikino

Both these images were taken by the same photographer (Osamu Hikino) and we can use the size of his finger tips (nice clean nails) to compare the size of these two species. The M. cassini is relatively much smaller than the M. septendecim, which is why M. cassini is also known as the “dwarf cicada”.

I don’t have a good photo of the third species, the Magicicada septendecula Alexander and Moore, 1962 [view a photo of M. septendecula on another website]. The M. septendecula is similar to the M. cassini in size (hence smaller than the M. septendecula), but it has orange stripes like the M. septendecim, which is why it is important to get a photo of the left or right side of the insect so we can see the color of the pronotal extension.

The pronotal extension is an extension of the pronotum that lies between the Magicicada’s eye and its wing (outlined in green in the photo below). M. septendecim have orange coloring in that area, which gives us a key way to visually distinguish them from M. septendecula.

Orange marking behind eye used to identify -decim Magicicadas.

If you want to learn more about diagnosing the species and gender of cicadas (all species, not just Magicicada sp.) using photographs, track down the document Overview of Cicada Morphology by Allen F. Sanborn of Barry University.

I don’t want to discourage you from taking amazing photos of cicadas in every position and angle possible using all your fancy macro lenses and whatnot. All cicada photos are awesome, but only a few angles help us identify the insect.

May 18, 2013

Brood II cicada photos from Iselin, NJ

My friend Nicole DiMaggio sent us these photos of adult Magicicadas taken in Iselin NJ. The emergence is just getting started in New Jersey, and will really kick off next Tuesday when the temps hit the 80s.

Click thumbnail images to see progressively larger versions of the images:

Adult Brood II cicada from Nicole DiMaggio in Iselin NJ

Adult Brood II cicada from Nicole DiMaggio in Iselin NJ

Photos of Brood II Magicicada cicadas from Westfield, NJ

Filed under: Brood II,Magicicada,Photos & Illustrations — Tags: — by @ 8:57 am

These photos of adult Magicicada cicadas were taken in Westfield, NJ by Jim Occi on May 16th.

Click thumbnail images to see progressively larger versions of the images:

Adult Brood II Magicicada septendecim from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi

Adult Brood II Magicicada septendecim from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi

Adult Brood II Magicicada septendecim from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi

Adult Brood II Magicicada septendecim from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi

Adult Brood II Magicicada from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi

Adult Brood II Magicicada from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi

Adult Brood II Magicicada from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi

Adult Brood II Magicicada from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi

This photo is particularly interesting as the cicadas’s wings were damaged during the ecdysis (moulting) process and its tymbal (the ribbed structure that makes the cicada’s sound) is clearly exposed:

Adult Brood II Magicicada with damaged wings and visible tymbal from Westfield NJ by Jim Occi

Brood II cicada photos from Front Royal, Va

Nature photographer Candice Trimble of Front Royal, Va, sent us these Brood II Magicicada photos.

Click thumbnail images to see progressively larger versions of the images:

An adult Magicicada septendecim (Linnaeus 1758):
Adult Magicicada septendecim from Front Royal, Va by Candice Trimble

Magicicada exuvia (shell):
Magicicada exuvia from Front Royal, VA by Candice Trimble.

Magicicada adult (probably an M. septendecim):
Adult Magicicada sp. from Front Royal, Va by Candice Trimble

Photos of a Brood II Magicicada from Madison, NC.

Filed under: Brood II,Magicicada,Photos & Illustrations — by @ 7:48 am

These photos of a Magicicada undergoing ecdysis (moulting) in Madison, NC are by photographer Heather James.

Click thumbnail images to see progressively larger versions of the images:


Molting cicada in Madison, NC by Heather James

The “white strings” connecting the teneral (soft) adult cicada to its exuvia (shell, skin) are the old lining of the cicada’s trachea (the tubes through which it breathed).


Molting cicada in Madison, NC by Heather James

March 9, 2010

Flickr Cicada Photos pool

Filed under: Photos & Illustrations — by @ 8:15 pm

If you’re on Flickr (the photo sharing site) and you have some cicada photos, add them to my cicada photos group pool.

Here’s a slide show of the images from the pool:

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