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August 31, 2016

An early start to Australia’s cicada season

Filed under: Australia,Cystosoma,Nathan Emery — Dan @ 5:56 am

Cicada researcher and photographer Nathan Emery found his first Bladder Cicada (Cystosoma saundersii) for the year. See this iNaturalist page. It is still winter there, so this is particular interesting.

A Bladder cicada looks like this (Cystosoma saundersii):

Bladder Cicada
Photo by David Emery.

Read more about this cicada on Dr. Pop’s website.

November 24, 2015

Cicada Fun with Google Trends

Filed under: Australia,Brood X,Japan,Periodical,United States — Dan @ 7:59 pm

This article was inspired by Serious Fun with Google Trends by Simon Leather.

Google Trends is a Google website that lets you see trends in the search terms over time. When people search for “cicada” it usually means cicadas have emerged in their area at the time they search.

The following graph shows when people searched for “cicada” over the past 10 years in the United States. The largest spike, in May of 2004, coincided with the emergence of Brood X.

2004-2015

You might think that periodical cicada emergences cause the largest spikes, but not always — and not just because periodical cicadas don’t emerge every year.

2004: Cicada searches spiked May 16-22, which was Brood X – Magicicadas.
2005: Jul 31-Aug 6 spike which was for Neotibicen Cicadas. No periodical cicadas.
2006: Aug 13-19, Neotibicen Cicadas. No periodical cicadas.
2007: May 20-26, Brood XIII – Magicicadas.
2008: Brood XIV Magicicadas emerged (spike Jun 8-14), but the largest spike was Jul 29-Aug 2, Neotibicen Cicadas.
2009: Aug 16-22, Neotibicen Cicadas.
2010: Aug 8-14, Neotibicen Cicadas.
2011: May 29-Jun 4, Brood XIX – Magicicadas.
2012: Jul 29-Aug 4, Neotibicen Cicadas.
2013: May 5-11, Brood II – Magicicadas.
2014: Brood XXII – Magicicadas had a relatively small spike May 25-31, compared with Aug 24-30 for Neotibicen Cicadas (late season due to cool weather). There was also a teeny bit of a spike around January of 2014 due to the “cicada 3301” meme/game.
2015: Brood XXIII & IV Magicicadas emerged (spike around Jun 7-13), but the largest spike was around Aug 9-15 for Neotibicen Cicadas.

Which cities had the most cicada searches over the past 10 years? Cincinnati, Omaha, Nashville, Baltimore, Washington, Chicago, Alexandria, St. Louis, Philadelphia, and Charlotte. Time for me to move to Cincinnati!

How about Australia? Cicada searches in Australia spike in December. The largest spike was in December of 2013, which was indeed a big year for cicada emergences in Australia.

The variation year after year suggests that there is a degree of periodicity to Australian cicadas. There is always a spike around December, but some years see bigger spikes than others. Just speculation (partially because the 2004 & 2005 data seems absent) but perhaps there is a 9 or 11 year proto-periocity happening.

In terms of cities, Sydney has had the most cicada searches:

How about Japan?! August is the best month for cicadas (セミ) in Japan.

Yokohama, Chiba & Saitama generates the most cicada searches:

November 21, 2015

Australian Cicada Names 🇦🇺

Filed under: Australia,David Emery — Tags: — Dan @ 1:01 am

It’s that time again: time for cicadas in Australia!

Australia has the best cicada names:

Cyclochila australasiae

Green Grocer

Green Grocer (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by Bron.

Green Grocer

rare green yellow Green Grocer
Photo by Kevin Lee. Yellow-Green Green Grocer with Mask.

Yellow Monday

Tom Katzoulopolopoulous (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by Tom Katzoulopolopoulous.


Blue Moon

Blue Moon (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by David Emery.

Masked Devil

Masked Devil cicada (Cyclochila australasiae)
Photo by David Emery.


Cherrynose or Whiskey Drinker (Macrotristria angularis)

Cherry Nose cicada (Macrotristria angularis)
Photo by David Emery.

Bagpipe Cicada (Lembeja paradoxa)

Lembeja paradoxa
Photo by David Emery.

Floury Baker (Abricta curvicosta)

Michelle Thompson's Floury Baker (Abricta curvicosta)
Photo by Michelle Thompson.

Golden Emperor (Anapsaltoda pulchra)

Anapsaltoda pulchra (Golden Emperor) from Herberton (Queensland) by David Emery.
Photo by David Emery.

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)

Double Drummer (Thopha saccata)
Photo by Kevin Lee.

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata)

Orange Drummer (Thopha colorata)
Photo by Jodi.

White Drummer (Arunta perulata)

White Drummer cicada (Arunta perulata)
Photo by David Emery.

Bladder Cicada (Cystosoma saundersii)

Cystosoma saundersii (bladder cicada)
Photo by David Emery.

Redeye cicada (Psaltoda moerens)

Redeye cicada (Psaltoda moerens)
Photo by David Emery.

Click images for larger versions.

More interesting names:

Use this amazing image by David Emery to identify some of the most well-known Australian cicada species:

Aussie cicadas 1 (3)

More resources:

September 25, 2015

The Great Cicada Blitz of Sydney Australia

Filed under: Australia,Nathan Emery — Dan @ 4:13 am

If you’re in the Sydney, Australia area and you see or hear a cicada this season, report it to the Great Cicada Blitz, an iNaturalist website set up by cicada researcher Nathan Emery. The purpose of this website is to map and identify the various cicada species in the Sydney area.

Cicada Blitz

January 20, 2015

Green Grocer Merch

Filed under: Australia,Cicada Mania,Cyclochila australasiae — Dan @ 6:23 am

Green Grocer

I felt bad about always using an illustration of North American cicadas, so I made a Green Grocer cicada for Australian fans.

Get this image on a shirt, mug or even a pillow case via CafePress (the mugs are the most affordable).

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